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Academic Life
Faculty Profile: Biologist, Genetics Education Advocate and Ferocious Drummer Jack Bateman

Biology professor Jack Bateman is the latest faculty member to be profiled in our series on professors. In these Q&As, faculty members answer our questions about their careers, research and little known facts about themselves.

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Student Life
Scott Mitchell ’15 Receives $10,000 Davis Grant

Scott Mitchell ’15 has received a $10,000 Davis Project for Peace Grant to continue building and distributing his low-cost standers that help children with cerebral palsy gain strength and interact with people around them.

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Featured Events

Rick Hess: "Reauthorizing 'No Child Left Behind': Challenges and Opportunities"

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March 27, 201512:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Hubbard Hall, The Pickering Room (213)

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) authorized federal spending on programs to support K-12 schooling. The act provided federal resources for states to level the playing field between schools in wealthy and poor districts. Its 2002 reauthorization, which became known as No Child Left Behind, mandated that all students hit arbitrary scores on standardized tests instead of ensuring equal opportunities. Rick Hess will discuss reforms being considered for another reauthorization, and examine the opportunities and challenges inherent to the process. 

Hess is a resident scholar and the director of educational policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington, D.C. He is a prolific author on a variety of issues related to K-12 and higher education, including books and edited volumes on educational policy implementation, leadership, school reform, No Child Left Behind, the Common Core, and the impact of education research. His most recent book is The Cage-Busting Teacher (Harvard Education Press, 2015).

Hess serves as executive editor of Education Next, as lead faculty member for the Rice Education Entrepreneurship Program, and on the review board for the Broad Prize for Public Charter Schools. A former high school social studies teacher, he has taught at a variety of institutions, including the University of Virginia, the University of Pennsylvania, and Georgetown University. He holds an MA and PhD in government and an MEd in teaching and curriculum, all from Harvard University.

His talk is sponsored by the Department of Government and Legal Studies with support from the Department of Education and the John C. Donovan Lecture Fund.

Free and open to the public.

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Justice for Palestine Week, Film Screening and Conversation with Director Yasmine Perni - 'The Stones Cry Out'

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March 28, 20152:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

In 1948, tens of thousands of Palestinian villagers were driven from their homes in the fertile hills and valleys of the Galilee in what was officially dubbed 'Operation Broom,' intended to literally sweep them away to make room for settlers in the newly created state of Israel. After the Galilee came the expropriation of the West Bank in 1967; Bethlehem, the birthplace of Christ, is now hemmed in by a wall, cut off from Jerusalem, and robbed of much of its agricultural land.

The Stones Cry Out examines the fact that while media coverage of the conflict in Palestine frames the struggle as one between Muslims and Jews, Palestine was the birthplace of Christianity, Palestinians
are both Muslims and Christians, and Palestinian Christians have played a critical role in their land's history and the struggle to maintain its identity.
Director Yasmine Perni moved from her native Italy to the Middle East when she was thirteen years old, living in Sudan, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Jordan and Jerusalem. A graduate of the University of London's School of Oriental and African Studies, she has worked as a journalist, photographer, television producer and mother, and speaks Italian, English, Swedish and Arabic.

Perni went into documentary filmmaking inspired by the Christians of Palestine, whose story of perseverance and pride has been largely obscured by the headlines. It was her first experience at producing and writing a documentary, and she conducted extensive research, combed through official Palestinian. Israel and United Nations film archives, and traveled the length and breadth of historic Palestine. 

This event is scheduled as part of Justice for Palestine Week, March 27 through April 1, 2015.

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Panel Discussion with Professor Doris Santoro: "Elevating the Status of Teaching"

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March 30, 20157:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

The Education Department invites students, educators, and the public to join us for a panel discussion to discuss what can be done to raise the status of the teaching profession. The event will be moderated by Professor Doris A. Santoro, associate professor of Education. Invited guest panelists include: 

Emmanuel Caulk, Superintendent, Portland Schools 


Paul Hambleton
Deputy Executive Director, Maine Education Association 

Maria Libby P'17 
Assistant Superintendent, MSAD 28/Five Town CSD (Camden) 

Jen Lunt
Teacher, Portland High School 

Meredith Nadeau '91
Superintendent, Cape Elizabeth Schools 

Betsy Webb 
Superintendent, Bangor Schools 

Professor Santoro received her doctor of education degree from Columbia University, Teachers College Program in Philosophy and Education, New York. Her philosophical inquiry is centered around the experiences of teachers and analyzed through the lens of John Dewey's work and feminist theories. She investigates the moral, ethical, and political implications of pedagogical stances such as social justice education and student-centered teaching. Her current work examines the moral and ethical reasons experienced teachers give for leaving high-poverty schools. 

Open to the public free of charge.  For more information, please contact the Education Department at 207.725.3465. 

Note: This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin's Live Webcasts page.

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Film Screening: 'Secundaria' with Filmmaker Mary Jane Doherty

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March 30, 20157:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Cleaveland 151

Boston University film professor Mary Jane Doherty traveledto Cuba multiple times over a period of years to complete what the Boston Globecalled a “lucid, watchful portrait of young ballet dancers desperately tryingto plié their way out of poverty and into the Ballet Nacional."

Doherty’sdocumentary Secundaria follows one high school class on itsjourney through Cuba’s world famous National Ballet School.  The teenagedancers love to dance…but many of them must dance as the only way to improve the lives of their impoverished families. 

As we follow Doherty’s primary subjects—middle-classGabriela, poor Mayara, poorer Moises— Secundaria reveals itself through cinematicstorytelling (and without a script, staging, or interviews) as being less aboutcompeting in dance and more about battling into adulthood.

Post-screening discussion with the filmmaker.

Free and open to the public - no tickets required.

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Craig Steven Wilder, Russwurm Lecture: 'Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America's Universities'

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March 31, 20156:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Craig Steven Wilder, professor of history at MIT and a leading historian of race in America, will deliver the annual John Brown Russwurm Lecture in the Main Lounge of Moulton Union. A reception in the Russwurm House Library will precede the lecture at 5:00pm. Both events are free and open to the public. 

Professor Wilder will examine the contrasting figures of "the matriculating Indian" and "the uneducable Negro" to explore the limits on access to higher education in the second half of the 18th century. Looking closely at the experiences of two friends, the Reverend Samson Occom - a member of the Mohegan nation who became a Presbyterian minister, and poet Phillis Wheatley - the first African-American woman to be published, Professor Wilder will demonstrate how illusory were even the modest hopes of education held by Native and enslaved Americans. Though hailed by well-wishers as possessors of exceptional talents, Occum and Wheatley could find no institutional structures that would support them in intellectual, literary, or religious pursuits. 

This lecture stems from Wilder's important and widely reviewed new study, Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America's Universities, where he argues that many of America's revered colleges and universities were soaked in the sweat, the tears, and sometimes the blood of people of color.

Professor Wilder is a senior fellow at the Bard Prison Initiative, where he has served as a guest lecturer, commencement speaker, academic advisor, and visiting professor. For more than a decade, this innovative program has given hundreds of men and women the opportunity to acquire a college education during their incarcerations in the New York State prison system. 

He has advised and appeared in numerous historical documentaries, including the celebrated Ken Burns, Sarah Burns, and David McMahon film, The Central Park Five; Kelly Anderson's highly praised exploration of gentrification, My Brooklyn; the History Channel's F.D.R.: A Presidency Revealed; and Ric Burn's award-winning PBS series, New York: A Documentary History

Named after the first African-American graduate of Bowdoin College (class of 1826), the John Brown Russwurm lecture series explores "the legacy and status of Black Americans". Notable speakers include Robert Levine, Lani Guinier, Carl Stokes, Vernon Jordan, Shirley Chisholm, Bayard Rustin, Benjamin Hooks, and Julian Bond, among others.


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Film Screening and Panel Discussion: 'Nostalgia for the Light'

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March 31, 20157:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Inthis enthralling and award-winning documentary, Chilean master directorPatricio Guzmantravels10,000 feet above sea level to the driest place on earth, the Atacama Desert,where atop the mountains astronomers from all over the world gather to observethe stars. The sky is so translucent that it allows them to see right to theboundaries of the universe.

But theAtacama is also a place where the harsh heat of the sun keeps human remainsintact: Pre-Columbian mummies; nineteenth-century explorers andminers; and political prisoners, disappeared by the Chileanarmy after the military coup of September 1973. While astronomers examine the most distant and oldest galaxies, women at the foot ofthe mountains search, even after twenty-five years, for the remains of theirloved ones, whose bodies were dumped here, to reclaim their families' histories.

Melding the celestial questof the astronomers and the earthly one of the women, Nostalgia for the Light isa moving and deeply personal odyssey.

Followed by a panel discussion with Allen Wells, Roger Howell, Jr. professor of history;Sarah Childress, visiting assistant professor of cinema studies; and SarahMontross, Andrew W. Mellon post-doctoral curatorial fellow.

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition, Past Futures: Science Fiction, Space Travel, and Postwar Art of the Americas.

RSVPs are requested but not required. You may RSVP at: https://nostalgiaforthelight.eventbrite.comor contact Christine Piontek at artmuseumevents@bowdoin.edu.

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Ellen Muehlberger: "Learning to Die: Early Christian Preaching About the Experience of Death"

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April 1, 20154:30 PM – 6:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Ellen Muehlberger considers an array of hellfire-and-horrible death preachers' texts in order to examine the ways in which early Christians constructed their discourse about dying. Dr. Muehlberger will map ways in which preachers sought to educate their audiences about the experience of death with distinctly Christian language and imagery while also demonstrating that Christians were habituated to late ancient and classical ways of thinking about teaching and learning.


Muehlberger is assistant professor of Christianity in Late Antiquity and a Charles A. Ryskamp Research Fellow at the University of Michigan. Her work is focused on the history of Christianity in the time period known as 'late antiquity,' roughly 300 C.E. to 700 C.E., concentrating on the rhetorical and historiographical methods Christians adopted as Christian culture shifted from being in the minority to being dominant in the later Roman Empire. 

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McKeen Center Community Read and Book Talk: "Ebony and Ivy"

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April 1, 20157:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

In his work Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America's Universities, Craig Steven Wilder argues that many of America's revered colleges and universities were soaked in the sweat, the tears, and sometimes the blood of people of color. 

Professor Tess Chakkalakal (Africana Studies and English) will moderate a discussion with Wilder, presenter of the annual John Brown Russwurm Lecture, before an audience in Kresge Auditorium, Visual Arts Center. 

Questions emailed from those live-streaming the conversation will be fielded during the chat. 

Please email questions to bookchat@bowdoin.edu

Note: This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin's Live Webcasts page.

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Lisa Yaszek: "Afrofuturism as Global Science Fiction?"

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April 1, 20157:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Lisa Yaszek explores the global aspects and movement of science fiction over the past two centuries through the focusing lens of Afrofuturism. As a mode of aesthetic practice characterized by the use of science fictional tropes and narrative technique to investigate the necessary relations of science, technology, and race, Afrofuturism has been deployed by artists across media to recover lost African and Afrodiasporic histories and to imagine rich, racially-diverse worlds of tomorrow that oppose the white-washed futures implicit in much first-world scientific and economic rhetoric. 

Yaszek begins her talk with a brief overview of Afrofuturism and its
relation to genre science fiction. She then considers the evolution of
Afrofuturism from its roots in nineteenth-century African-American utopian and military fiction to its integration with mid-twentieth- century Western science fiction and its current spread across the Atlantic seaboard and Africa itself. Taken together, the stories, films, and comics produced by black men and women over the past 200 years demonstrates both the global nature of race relations in the modern era and the centrality of science and technology to the production of these relations.

Lisa Yaszek is a professor of science fiction studies a the School of Literature, Media and Communication at Georgia Tech, where she also serves as the director of the SciFi@Tech. She is the past president of the Science Fiction Research Association, and her research interests include science fiction, cultural history, critical race and gender studies, and science and technical studies. Her books include Galactic Suburbia: Recovering Women's Science Fiction, (Ohio State University Press, 2008), and she co-edited the Configurations special double issue on science fiction author Kim Stanley Robinson (Winter-Spring 2012), among other publications. She is currently completing an anthology on women's work in the early science fiction community and serving as associate producer for the science fiction film Rite of Passage.

This event is open to the public and is free of charge.

For more information, contact Arielle Saiber (asaiber@bowdoin.edu).

Sponsored by the Departments of Romance Languages, English and Africana Studies and the Cinema Studies Program.

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Newell Lewey and Vera Francis on Passamaquoddy Tribe Initiatives: "Past, Present, and Building Dialogue"

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April 1, 20157:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Cram Alumni House, Barn (Torrey Barn)

The Passamaquoddy Tribe has engaged in two initiatives to strengthen their community and restore the ecosystem on which their culture was founded. The first is the Maine-Wabanaki State Child Welfare Truth and Reconciliation Commission, the goal of which is to begin to heal from the pain inflicted on members of the Tribe who as children were forcibly removed from their homes and, in many cases, subsequently abused. The second is an effort to rebuild the natural resource base on which the Tribe depended for thousands of years. The Passamaquoddy Tribal Council has recently set a goal of achieving fifty percent food sovereignty by 2018.

Newell Lewey and Vera Francis, members of the Passamaquoddy Tribal Council at Pleasant Point in Eastport, ME will provide the Bowdoin and Brunswick communities an opportunity to gain understanding of the tribes struggle to recover from hundreds of years of discrimination, disenfranchisement and loss of self-determination.

Co-sponsored by Multicultural Student Programs and the Environmental Studies Program with funding support from the Concerts and Lectures Committee.

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Justice for Palestine Week, Film Screening: 'Budrus'

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April 1, 20158:30 PM – 10:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Nearly seven years ago, in the middle of the bloody battle
between Palestinians and Israelis known as the second intifada, an extraordinary set of events occurred in a poor West Bank village. Israel was building a security barrier, a mix of fencing and wall, to block terrorists. But the route was swallowing up large tracts of Palestinian land and was impossibly disruptive in places, including in the village of Budrus. Scores of ancient olive trees that provided a living were uprooted, and the villagers were going to be cut off from their farmlands.

The people of Budrus fought back, but not with arms. Led by a father-daughter team, they unified feuding political factions, brought Palestinian women from inside their homes to stand up to bulldozers and armed troops, and invited Israeli activists to join the protest. After ten months of relentless and disciplined work, the Israeli military rerouted the barrier around their lands. 

The documentary film Budrus highlights the non-violent resistance in the Palestinian village. Producer Ronit Avni stated that the film was made in response to questions concerning the existence of Palestinian non-violence movements and explores what it looks like when such a movement emerges.

This event is scheduled as part of Justice for Palestine Week, March 27 through April 1, 2015.

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David Collings, Community Lecture: "The Human Significance of Climate Change"

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April 2, 201512:30 PM – 1:30 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Nearly everything we do is premised on the assumption that the world we know will endure into the future and provide a sustaining context for our activities. But today the future of a viable biosphere, and thus the purpose of our activities, is put into question. A disappearing future leads to a broken present and a strange incoherence in the feel of everyday life.We thus face the unprecedented challenge of salvaging a basis for our lives today. 

That basis may be found in our ability to assume an infinite responsibility for ecological disaster. By owning disaster and accepting our small place within the inhuman forces of the biosphere, we may discover how to live with responsibility and serenity whatever may come.
Join David Collings for a discussion of his new book, Stolen Future, Broken Present: The Human Significance of Climate Change, in which he argues that we are virtually out of time to prevent severe, irreversible climate change - with a devastating effect on how we think about the future.  

David Collings teaches courses in British Romanticism, critical theory, sexuality and gender, and environmental studies. He is the author of Wordsworthian Errancies: The Poetics of Cultural Dismemberment (1994) and Monstrous Society: Reciprocity, Discipline, and the Political Uncanny, c. 1780-1848 (2009), among others.

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Members' Event: "Curators' Perspectives: Bowdoin's Historic Collection in New Installations"

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April 2, 20157:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Museum members are invited to join Laura Sprague, consulting curator, decorative arts; Andrea Rosen, curatorial assistant; and Joachim Homann, curator, for a discussion and tour of the new installations of art from the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries. Find out how James Bowdoin's legacy continues to shape the Museum.

RSVPs are requested but not required. You may RSVP here: https://curatorsperspectives.eventbrite.com or email artmuseumevents@bowdoin.edu.

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Noliwe Rooks: "Because What is Beautiful is Good: Erasing Race and Selling Feminism in the Dove Campaign for Real Beauty"

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April 6, 20157:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

This talk explores the role that Black women played at the beginning and the end of the first international Dove brand "real beauty" campaign and how and why that campaign used feminism as an advertising tool.

Noliwe Rooks is currently an Associate Professor in Africana Studies and Feminist, Gender, Sexuality Studies at Cornell University where she is also the Director of Graduate Studies in Africana Studies. She is an interdisciplinary scholar whose work explores the racial implications of beauty, fashion and adornment as well as the way race and gender both impact and are impacted by popular culture, social history and political life in the United States.

Rooks is the author of three books. The first, Hair Raising: Beauty, Culture and African American Women (1996, Rutgers University Press) won both the 1997 Choice Award for Outstanding Academic Book, and the Public Library Associations 1997 award for Outstanding University Press Book. Her second book, Ladies Pages: African American Women's Magazines and the Culture that Made Them (Rutgers University Press) was published in 2004. Her most recent book, White Money/Black Power: African American Studies and the Crises of Race in Higher Education was published in 2006 with Beacon Press.

She has two forthcoming edited collections: "Black Fashion: Gender. Art. Politics" a special issue of NKA: Journal of Contemporary Art, Duke University Press, Fall 2015, No. 37 and Women and Magazines in the 21st Century: Race, Writing and New Media (Under Consideration). Her current book project is about the politics of race and economics of K-12 education in the United States and tentatively titled, Apartheid in America and Why it Matters That We Have Reached the Beginning of the End of Public Education.

Open to the public free of charge.

For more information, contact Hanetha Vete-Congolo at mvete@bowdoin.edu.

Sponsored by the Andrew Mellon Foundation (Mellon Humanities Initiative).

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Stacy Vandeveer: "Climate Politics Are Everywhere! Hope and Change in Transnational, National, and Local Spaces"

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April 6, 20157:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

The world of climate politics is increasingly no longer confined to the activities of national governments and international negotiations. Critical to this transformation of the politics of climate change has been the emergence of new forms of transnational governance that cut across traditional state-based jurisdictions and operate across public and private divides. 

In this presentation, Stacy Vandeveer will examine the world of climate change governance and the implications for the field of global environmental politics. He is currently professor of political science and chair of the department of political science at the University of New Hampshire. His teaching and research interests include international environmental policymaking and its domestic impacts, comparative environmental politics, connections between environmental and security issues, the roles of expertise in policy making and the global politics of consumption and environmental and humanitarian degradation. 

In addition to authoring and co-authoring over seventy articles, book chapters, working papers and reports, he co-edited six books: Comparative Environmental Politics (MIT Press 2012); The Global Environment: Institutions, Law and Policy (CQ Press 2010); Changing Climates in North American Politics (MIT Press 2009); Transatlantic Environment and Energy Politics (Ashgate 2009); EU Enlargement and the Environment (Routledge 2005); and Saving the Seas (1997). He co-edits the journal Global Environmental Politics (MIT Press).

This event is free and open to the public.

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Brendan Nyhan: "Why do Journalists Fact-Check? The Role of Demand- and Supply-side Factors"

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April 7, 20154:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

Politicians in the United States are coming under increasing scrutiny from fact-checkers like PolitiFact, Factcheck.org, and the Washington Post Fact Checker, who examine the accuracy of public statements that are often reported without challenge by traditional news organizations. However, we know little about the effects of this practice, especially on public officials. One possibility is that fact checking might help to deter the dissemination of misinformation, especially for candidates and legislators at lower levels of government who receive relatively little scrutiny and are sensitive to potential threats to re-election. 

In his presentation, Brendan Nyhan explores new data on the spread of fact-checking and estimates the influence of changes in practice by professional peers, audience demand, and journalistic values on its prevalence in political journalism. 
Nyhan is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Government at Dartmouth College. His research focuses on political scandal and misperceptions about politics and health care.

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Namiko Kunimoto: "Artist Nakamura Hiroshi and the Politics of Embodiment"

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April 7, 20154:30 PM – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

After Japan surrendered in 1945, ending World War II, Allied forces led by the United States occupied the nation, bringing drastic changes. Japan was disarmed, its empire dissolved, its form of government changed to a democracy, and its economy and education system reorganized and rebuilt. By the 1950s, a former enemy became a Western ally, and parts of American culture became part of the Japanese landscape. This was not, however, an era of unadulterated “influence” from the West, nor a simple abandonment of domestic politics for a new devotion to transnationalism. This was a time that was ambivalent and uncertain, challenging and rousing. To be an avant-garde artist in this context meant that one aimed for lofty ideals: to restructure one’s own sense of place in the world, through art and for art. 

Artist Nakamura Hiroshi's work in this period was influenced by the American military occupation of the Japanese town of Sagawa, and the conflicts between the townspeople and soldiers. His paintings came to represent the genre of Reportage Painting, in which young artists expressed Socialist concerns through their art in a style combining Social Realism and Surrealism. 

Dr. Namiko Kunimoto, assistant professor of art history at Ohio State University, is a specialist in modern and contemporary Japanese art, with research interests in gender, urbanization, photography, performance art, transnationalism, and nation formation. She will examine how Nakamura Hiroshi used representation to interrogate the inter-relationship of artistic status, politics, and selfhood. 

Sponsored by The Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund and the Departments of Art History and Asian Studies.


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Zaheer Ali: "From Malcolm Little to El Hajj Malik Shabazz: A Journey of Faith"

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April 7, 20155:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

Most discussions of Malcolm X's life tend to emphasize his politics and downplay the role of religion in his life. Or, if they do address his religion, these examinations often see Islam as something that Malcolm truly embraces only after leaving the Nation of Islam and making his hajj (pilgrimage) to Mecca. This talk examines the ways that religion in general, and Islam in particular, figured very early in Malcolm's life, and provided a passport for his growing internationalist politics.

Zaheer Ali is a PhD candidate in history at Columbia University. Under the direction of the late Manning Marable, he served as one of the project managers and a senior researcher of the Malcolm X Project (MXP), a multi-year research initiative on the life and legacy of Malcolm X.

Free and open to the public.

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Akram Belkaid: "The Arab Spring Four Years After: A Failure or the Beginning of a Transition?"

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April 8, 20157:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

In 2011, several Arab peoples rose up against their dictatorial or authoritarian regimes. From Tunisia to Bahrain via Egypt, Yemen or Syria, the same slogans mobilized the masses: freedom and dignity but also bread and employment. "The people want the fall of the regime" was the now famous slogan adopted by protesters committed to ending decades of deprivation of their most basic rights, among them "the right to rights." This shock wave brought down regimes or forced leaders to leave power (Tunisia, Egypt). It obliged many others to open their purse strings to buy social peace (The Gulf monarchies, Algeria). Four years after this unexpected dislocation, the debate is far from over regarding the real and structural outcome of the so-called "Arab Spring." After a quick reminder of the events of 2011, this presentation addresses the following points:

- Should the Arab Spring be considered a failure in light of the dramatic situation experienced by countries like Syria, Libya or Yemen? Or, would it be more appropriate to see it as a long-term transition?

- What are the prospects for the two countries where the Arab Spring began? Tunisia is an exception with its democratic, but fragile, experiment while Egypt has returned to authoritarianism and violence.

- Is the rise of ISIS a consequence of the Arab Spring? How will the Arab world face the extremist threat in the coming years in a context of a rising terrorism and a weakening of states?

Akram Belkaid, born in Algeria, is a journalist and a writer. He lives in France and works for Le Monde Diplomatique, a monthly magazine specialized in geostrategic issues. He is also a columnist with Le Quotidien d'Oran in Algeria and he has published several books about the Arab world, among them: Being Arab Today (Etre arabe aujourd'hui, carnetsnord, Paris, 2011) and Back to Algeria (Retours en Algerie, carnetsnord, Paris, 2013).

This event is free and open to the public.

Sponsored by the Departments of Romance Languages, Government and Legal Studies, and Religion.

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Chris Potholm: "A Closer View of Bowdoin's Civil War Monument"

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April 9, 20155:30 PM – 6:45 PM
Memorial Hall, Drake Lobby (102)

The construction of Memorial Hall generated more meetings, minutes, votes, and printed material than that of any of Bowdoin's other nineteenth-century buildings. The post-Civil War decades were financially difficult, yet despite fiscal stress there was a widespread urge in New England to build Civil War memorials, and in the seventeen years from its conception to its dedication, it was the only building project on the campus. Dedicated in 1882, it remains a reminder of those who had served during the Civil War.Chris Potholm, DeAlva Standwood Alexander Professor of Government, offers remarks on Bowdoin's Memorial Hall, built to honor Bowdoin alumni who had fought to preserve the Union.

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Aviva Briefel, Bowdoin Friends Book Lecture: "Sherlocked: Desire and Detection"

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April 9, 20157:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Aviva Briefel explores the cultural obsession with Sherlock Holmes that started in 1886 with the publication of A Study in Scarlet and extends well into the present day. Focusing on Arthur Conan Doyle's The Sign of Four (1890), A Scandal in Bohemia (1891), and the adaptations of these texts found in the BBC series Sherlock (2010- ), Briefel will discuss this obsession in relation to depictions of romantic (and not so romantic) desire found in the stories themselves.

Aviva Briefel is professor of English and cinema studies. She has published several papers about horror films and was commentator on Bravo's 100 Scariest Movie Moments and Even Scarier Movie Moments.

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Jessica Lefevre and the Arctic Marine Mammal Coalition: "Modern Ecological, Political, and Social Change in the Alaskan Arctic"

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April 9, 20157:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Have you ever wondered what it is like to watch major portions of the coast on which you depend destroyed by massive storms, discover that waters from which you make a living are becoming an international shipping route, and observe that the marine mammals on which you depend are suddenly acting strangely? 

Jessica Lefevre is an attorney who specializes in natural resources issues and serves as counsel and advisor to Alaskan indigenous groups. She will be joined by seven Yup'ik and Inupiat hunters and leaders representing the Arctic Marine Mammal Coalition. These Alaskan maritime hunting groups are on the front lines of climate change and globalization. They will discuss what it is like to live through rapid social, economic, and legal transition and how they are responding to challenges to their environment and way of life. 

Sponsored by the Oak Foundation, Wildlife Conservation Society, and Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum and Arctic StudiesPhoto of Inupiat hunters by Bill Hess.

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Ambassador Thomas Pickering '53, H'84: "Civil War to Civility: Bowdoin's Sons and Ending Strife-Then and Now"

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April 9, 20157:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Memorial Hall, Pickard Theater

Ambassador Thomas Pickering holds the personal rank of career ambassador, the highest in the United States Foreign Service. Over five decades, he served as the United States ambassador to the Russian Federation, India, Israel, El Salvador, Nigeria and the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. In 2005, Ambassador Pickering became the fourteenth recipient of the Bowdoin Prize, the College's highest honor. In his presentation, "Civil War to Civility: Bowdoin's Sons and Ending Strife-Then and Now", he will speak about the peace reached on April 9, 1865 as part of the College's commemoration of the end of the Civil War.

Open to the public, free of charge.  

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Brian Mello: "The End of the Liberalized Autocracy in the Middle East and North Africa"

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April 13, 20157:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Prior to the events of the Arab Spring, it was believed that controlled liberalization and the emergence of hybrid authoritarian regimes—what scholar Daniel Brumberg termed liberalized autocracies—contributed to authoritarian stability in the Middle East and North Africa.  

In this talk, Brian Mello challenges these assumptions by identifying a set of causal mechanisms that emerged within liberalized autocracies that help to explain why the wave of protest in the Arab Spring began in and contributed to regime change primarily in such hybrid regimes. He concludes by examining what this wave of contentious politics might mean for the future of liberalized autocracy and democracy in the region.

Brian Mello is Associate Professor of Political Science at Muhlenberg College. He is author of Evaluating Social Movement Impacts: Comparative Lessons from the Labor Movement in Turkey(2013, Bloomsbury Academic). 


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Anne Sarah Rubin: "Through the Heart of Dixie: Sherman's March and American Memory"

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April 16, 20154:30 PM – 6:00 PM
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

Sherman's March, cutting a path through Georgia and the Carolinas, is among the most symbolically potent events of the Civil War. In this presentation, Anne Sarah Rubin uncovers and unpacks stories and myths about the March from a wide variety of sources, including African Americans, women, Union soldiers, Confederates, and even Sherman himself. Drawing her evidence from an array of media, including travel accounts, memoirs, literature, films, and newspapers, Rubin uses the competing and contradictory stories as a lens into the way that American thinking about the Civil War has changed over time.

Anne Sarah Rubin is associate professor of history at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

Part of the Enhancing the Humanities at Bowdoin Civil War Era Cluster.

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Bowdoin's Annual Spring Dance Concert: Student Performances to Surprise and Delight

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April 16, 20158:00 PM – 9:30 PM
Memorial Hall, Pickard Theater

Bowdoin's Spring Dance Concert features students of all levels, in dances composed by faculty, guest artists, and returning alumni. Alternately raucous and tender, musical and austere, this annual event never fails to surprise and delight.

Open to the public, free of charge. 

FREE TICKETS. Tickets available at the Smith Union information desk beginning March 30 (207-725-3375). Tickets will also be available at the door. Patrons should plan to be seated by 7:45 pm.

Pickard Theater is located in Memorial Hall, on the corner of Bath Road and Maine Street.

With generous support from: The Alice Cooper Morse Fund for the Performing Arts and the June Vail Fund for Dance

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Bowdoin's Annual Spring Dance Concert: Student Performances to Surprise and Delight

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April 17, 20158:00 PM – 9:30 PM
Memorial Hall, Pickard Theater

Bowdoin's Spring Dance Concert features students of all levels, in dances composed by faculty, guest artists, and returning alumni. Alternately raucous and tender, musical and austere, this annual event never fails to surprise and delight.

Open to the public, free of charge. 

FREE TICKETS. Tickets available at the Smith Union information desk beginning March 30 (207-725-3375). Tickets will also be available at the door. Patrons should plan to be seated by 7:45 pm.

Pickard Theater is located in Memorial Hall, on the corner of Bath Road and Maine Street.

With generous support from: The Alice Cooper Morse Fund for the Performing Arts and the June Vail Fund for Dance.

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Bowdoin's Annual Spring Dance Concert: Student Performances to Surprise and Delight

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April 18, 20158:00 PM – 9:30 PM
Memorial Hall, Pickard Theater

Bowdoin's Spring Dance Concert features students of all levels, in dances composed by faculty, guest artists, and returning alumni. Alternately raucous and tender, musical and austere, this annual event never fails to surprise and delight.

Open to the public, free of charge. 

FREE TICKETS. Tickets available at the Smith Union information desk beginning March 30 (207-725-3375). Tickets will also be available at the door. Patrons should plan to be seated by 7:45 pm.

Pickard Theater is located in Memorial Hall, on the corner of Bath Road and Maine Street.

With generous support from: The Alice Cooper Morse Fund for the Performing Arts and the June Vail Fund for Dance.

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Dorothea Rockburne, Santagata Lecture: "Materializing Mathematical Concepts into Visual Art"

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April 20, 20157:30 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

When Dorothea Rockburne first began making her paintings and works on paper in the 1950s, she never thought that her pieces would be viewed in an exhibition context, both because she was a woman, and because her mathematics-inspired paintings didn't fit neatly into Abstract Expressionism or subsequently Minimalism. Consequently, she believed she would never be able to show her work. Her assumptions, of course, proved to be false. 


Rockburne not only exhibited, but she did so widely. When the big museums and galleries first started showing female artists in the late 1960s, they were looking for formed work; she was there right at the beginning of the feminist art movement. Since then and throughout her artistic career, Rockburne has created shapes that reflect her profound understanding of mathematical theory. Learning from the legendary mathematician Max Dehn as a student at Black Mountain College, and nurtured by friendships with experimental artists such as Robert Rauschenberg and John Cage, she found compelling ways to apply the creativity of mathematics to painting. 

Rockburne was born in Canada and received her initial training in Montreal. She holds a doctorate of fine arts and is a long-time member of the New York art scene. A traveling retrospective, Dorothea Rockburne: In My Mind's Eye, was organized by the Parrish Museum, Southampton, New York in 2011. According to Frieze magazine, it "reaffirmed Rockburne's claim to a central position in the American avant-garde." When the Museum of Modern Art in New York dedicated an exhibition to her work in the winter of 2013-2014, a New York Times reviewer commented, "Ms. Rockburne's work can be as physical as it is heady, turning math into a kind of dance or a form of Process Art." 

Sponsored by the Kenneth V. Santagata Memorial Fund

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Cristina Malcolmson: 'Studies of Skin Color in the Early Royal Society'

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April 23, 20154:30 PM – 5:30 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

In her most recent book, Studies of Skin Color in the Early Royal Society: Boyle, Cavendish, Swift (Ashgate, 2013), Cristina Malcolmson demonstrates how unstable the idea of race remained in England at the end of the seventeenth century, and yet how extensively the intertwined institutions of government, colonialism, the slave trade, and science were collaborating to usher it into public view.

Arguing that the early Royal Society moved science toward racialization by giving skin color a new prominence as an object of experiment and observation, Malcolmson provides the first book-length examination of studies of skin color in the society. She also brings new light to the relationship between early modern literature, science, and the establishment of scientific racism in the nineteenth century.

Malcolmson, professor of English at Bates College, has also written The 'Empire of Man over the Inferior Creatures': British Women, Race, and Seventeenth-Century Science for The Palgrave History of British Women's Writing, and a collaborative article with Ruth Paley (first author) and Michael Hunter on 'Parliament and Slavery 1660-c.1700' which appeared in the journal Slavery and Abolition in 2010.

Sponsored by the English Department. For more information, contact department coordinator Laurie Holland at 207-725-3552 or lholland@bowdoin.edu.

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