In Light of Rome: Early Photography in the Capital of the Art World, 1842–1871

Museum of Art Museum of Art

Exhibition: In Light of Rome: Early Photography in the Capital of the Art World, 1842–1871

Dates:

Location:

Halford Gallery, Bernard and Barbro Osher Gallery
“In Light of Rome” comprehensively explores the contribution made by the cosmopolitan art center to the early history of photography and traces the medium’s rise there that forever changed the way we perceive the Eternal City.

Selected Works

An old photograph showing water in the foreground, with a town in the background

Isola San Bartholomeo, 1842, quarter-plate daguerreotype, by Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey

an old photograph of a  temple/building with columns

Temple of Antoninus and Faustina, Rome, May 1846, salt print from a calotype negative, by Rev. Calvert Richard Jones, Welsh, 1802–1877

A sepia photograph with steps leading to an obelisk, a wall on the left, and a domed building in the background

The Forum with the Column of Phocas, the Arch of Septimius Severus, and the Church of Santi Luca e Martina, 1849, salt print by Frédéric Flachéron , French, 1813–1883

A sepia photograph with a road leading to an large architectural arcch

The Arch of Titus with Figure, ca. 1850, salt print from a glass negative, by Eugéne Constant, French, dates unknown

A sepia photograpy of a tall palm tree

A Palm Tree near the Basilica of San Pietro in Vincoli, ca. 1850–1852, salt print, attributed to Pierre Antoine de Bermond de Vaulx, French, 1821–1900

A sepia photograph showing statues in front of a building

The Basilica of Santa Maria in Ara Coeli seen from the Capitoline, ca. 1852–1855, coated salted paper print from a paper negative, by Firmin-Eugène Le Dien (French, 1817–1865) and Gustav Le Gray (French, 1820–1884)

a sepia photograpph of a city on a hill, with a basilica in the distance

The Basilica of St. Peter’s and the Spina di Borgo Seen from Castel St. Angelo, ca. 1855, salt print, by James Anderson, British, 1813–1877

a sepia photograph of a large white, multi-storied building with many windows with a river at the foundation

Palazzo Altoviti on the Tiber, ca. 1851–57, albumen print, Robert Macpherson, Scottish, 1814–1872

a sepia photograph of ancient ruins before a dramatic sky

The Roman Forum seen from the Capitoline Hill with Moonlight Effect, ca. 1867, albumen silver print from glass negative, Gioacchino Altobelli , Italian, 1814–after 1878

About

In Light of Rome... comprehensively explores, for the first time in the United States, the contribution made by the cosmopolitan art center to the early history of photography and traces the medium’s rise there from a fledgling science to a dynamic form of artistic expression that forever changed the way we perceive the Eternal City. The exhibition ranges from 1842 to 1871, from the earliest pioneers—the French daguerreotypist Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey and the Welsh calotypist Calvert Richard Jones—to the work of the Roman School of Photography and its successors, among them James Anderson and Robert Macpherson of Britain; Frédéric Flachéron, Firmin Eugène Le Dien, and Gustave Le Gray of France; and Giacomo Caneva, Adriano de Bonis, and Pietro Dovizielli of Italy. Featuring 112 works, many never before seen publicly, by nearly fifty transnational photographers, this presentation and its accompanying catalogue will expand our understanding of Rome’s place in the evolution of early photography, and the pivotal role it played in the refinement and technical development of the nascent medium in the nineteenth century.