Helen Frankenthaler and Jo Sandman: Without Limits

Museum of Art Museum of Art

Exhibition: Helen Frankenthaler and Jo Sandman: Without Limits

Dates:

Location:

Shaw Ruddock Gallery
Helen Frankenthaler (1928–2011) and Jo Sandman (b. 1931) reveal new modes of conceptualizing art in the 1960s and printmaking’s role in that revolution.

Selected Works

an abstract image in shades of corals, with a few green highlights

Passeggiata Romana, 1973, Edition 24/32, sugar-lift etching and aquatint on paper, by Helen Frankenthaler, American, 1928-2011. Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, Maine, Gift of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, 2019.28.3 © 2022 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / 2RC Editrice, Rome. Photography by Tim Pyle, Blue Light Studio

An abstract image, with horizontal brushstokes, in shades of brown, orange, yellows, and grays

Deep Sun, 1983, Artist Proof 7/16, color etching, soft-ground etching, aquatint, spitbite aquatint, drypoint, engraving, and mezzotint by Helen Frankenthaler, American, 1928-2011. Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, Maine, Gift of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, 2019.28.6 © 2022 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / Tyler Graphics Ltd., Bedford Village, NY. Photography by Tim Pyle, Blue Light Studio.

an abstract image in oranges and corals with green highlights

Sanguine Mood, 1971, Edition 17/75 Pochoir and screenprint on paper, by Helen Frankenthaler, American, 1928-2011. Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, Maine, Gift of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, 2019.28.2.9 © 2022 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / Women's Board Commission, San Francisco Museum of Art (SFMOMA). Photography by Tim Pyle, Blue Light Studio

An abstract image in shades of dark turquoise with strokes of brown

Guadalupe, 1989, Edition 8/74, Mixografia on paper, by Helen Frankenthaler, American 1928-2011. Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, Maine, Gift of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, 2019.28.7 © 2022 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / Mixografia, Los Angeles. Photography by Tim Pyle, Blue Light Studio

a vertical image of a coarse fabric with carefully folded lines

Untitled [Folded Drawing], ca. 1970–1971, folded fabric drawing, white duck, by Jo Sandman, American, born 1931. Gift of the Artist. Bowdoin College Museum of Art, 2020.36.9. © Jo Sandman/Sandman Legacy Project. Photography by Luc Demers

A dark horizontal, rectangular image, with many smaller rectangles in patterns going in opposite directiouns

Untitled [from Removals], 1976, collage, interior insulation foil, by Jo Sandman, American, born 1931. Gift of the Artist. Bowdoin College Museum of Art, 2020.36.1. © Jo Sandman/Sandman Legacy Project. Photography by Luc Demers

An off-center rectangle made of cloth with paint splatters

Untitled [from Tarpaulin Series], 1981, collage, found painter’s dropcloth mounted on museum board, by Jo Sandman, American, born 1931. Gift of the Artist. 2020.36.2. © Jo Sandman/Sandman Legacy Project. Photography by Luc Demers.

an installation view of a piece made with a  gathering of copper wire and nails with a white pedestal at the bottom, a

Compressed Drawing, 1982, cooper wire, painted wooden pedestal, nails, by Jo Sandman, American, born 1931. Gift of the Artist. Bowdoin College Museum of Art, 2020.36.3. © Jo Sandman/Sandman Legacy Project. Photography by Luc Demers

 

About

Born three years apart, Helen Frankenthaler (1928–2011) and Jo Sandman (b. 1931) matured absorbing the lessons of Abstract Expressionism. In the early 1960s both artists expanded beyond their painting practices (though never abandoned them) to explore new modes of expression. Frankenthaler began a robust five-decade engagement with printmaking, consistently exploring new media and processes. Jo Sandman moved toward minimalism, simultaneously experimenting with new materials and techniques. Although working independently of one another, the artists, as a pair, point toward new modes of conceptualizing art practice and the important role of printmaking in that revolution.

 

For all their support of this exhibition and related educational initiatives, we express our gratitude to the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation for its gift made as part of its “Frankenthaler Prints Initiative” for university-affiliated Museums and to the Riley P. Brewster ’77 Fund for the Bowdoin College Museum of Art.