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International

Spring 2011 International Perspectives Courses

Bowdoin students are required to take one full credit course in International Perspectives.  International Perspectives courses assist students in gaining a critical understanding of the world outside the United States, both contemporary and historical.  

The list below is comprised of International Perspectives courses being offered in the current semester.   It does not include all of Bowdoin's international offerings - only the courses that satisfy the International Perspectives curricular requirement.

AFRICANA STUDIES

136.  Black Musics in Latin America and the Caribbean
Michael Quintero
An introduction to various Afro-Latin American and Afro-Caribbean musical forms and some of the issues and debates that surround them. Students examine case studies from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries. Some central themes include similarities and differences in black identity across the Americas, the relative importance of African retentions and New World innovations in the formation of these musical forms, the nature of cultural mixture with indigenous and European forms, the role of music in black religion, and musical dialogues between differently located black populations in the Americas.

209.  Introduction to the Study and Criticism of Francophone Literature
Hanetha Vete-Congolo
Introduces students to the literary tradition of the contemporary Francophone world. Focuses on major authors and literary movements in historical and cultural context. Conducted in French.

222.  Politics and Societies in Africa
Ericka Albaugh
Surveys societies and politics in sub-Saharan Africa, seeking to understand the sources of current conditions and the prospects for political stability and economic growth. Looks briefly at pre-colonial society and colonial influence on state-construction in Africa, and concentrates on three broad phases in Africa's contemporary political development: (1) independence and consolidation of authoritarian rule; (2) economic decline and challenges to authoritarianism; (3) democratization and civil conflict. Presumes no prior knowledge of the region.

264.  Conquest, Colonialism, and Independence: Africa since 1880
Olufemi Vaughan
Focuses on conquest, colonialism, and its legacies in sub-Saharan Africa; the violent process of colonial pacification, examined from European and African perspectives; the different ways of consolidating colonial rule and African resistance to colonial rule, from Maji Maji to Mau Mau; and African nationalism and independence, as experienced by Africa's nationalist leaders, from Kwame Nkrumah to Jomo Kenyatta, and their critics. Concludes with the limits of independence, mass disenchantment, the rise of the predatory post-colonial state, genocide in the Great Lakes, and the wars of Central Africa.

269.  After Apartheid: Southern African History and Historiography
David Gordon
Seminar.Investigates the diverse representations and uses of the past in South Africa. Begins with the difficulties in developing a critical and conciliatory version of the past in post-apartheid South Africa during and after the much-discussed Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Then turns to diverse historical episodes and sites of memory from the Great Trek to the inauguration of Nelson Mandela to explore issues of identity and memory from the perspectives of South Africa's various peoples.

273.  African Art: Masks and Masquerades
Olubukola Gbadegesin
Masquerades are a major element of West African visual culture. They combine dramatic costumes with improvised bodily performance to create dynamic and interactive events that are rooted in religious belief systems, rites of passage, ancestor veneration, politics, and other sociocultural concerns. Surveys the masking traditions of several ethnic groups in West Africa, paying special attention to the forms and functions of the masquerades. Students learn about the processes through which these performances are executed by the maskers and experienced by audiences. Looks briefly at how these masquerades have been channeled in contemporary African music, theatrical plays, and films.

ANTHROPOLOGY

204.  Globalization and Identity in the Himalayas
Jan Brunson
Using contemporary ethnographies, traces the ways notions of identity-including global, national, ethnic, caste, and individual-have changed among groups in the Himalayas in response to recent political, economic, and historical circumstances. Focuses on the influence of culture on identity formation and the deployment of identity in a political fashion in the Himalayan region. Topics include Hindu caste and gender hierarchies, constructions of ethnicity, Tibetans and tourists, Sherpas and mountaineers, development ideologies, and consumerism.

257.  Anthropology and the Environment
Jonathan Padwe
Explores anthropological approaches to the natural world and applies anthropological forms of investigation to environmental issues. Topics include indigenous peoples' environmental management practices, common property resource management, deforestation, conflicts over natural resources, and the cultural politics of conservation. Covers a series of approaches, from ecological anthropology and human/cultural ecology to political economy, political ecology, and the politics of representation within environmental struggles. Focuses on environmental issues in Asia, Africa, and Latin America, with specific case studies drawn from India and South America's Amazon Basin providing a comparative perspective.

ARCHAEOLOGY

202.  Augustan Rome
Barbara Boyd
Upon his ascent to power after a century of war, Rome's first princeps, Augustus, launched a program of cultural reformation and restoration that was to have a profound and enduring effect upon every aspect of life in the empire, from fashions in entertainment, decoration, and art, to religious and political habits and customs. Using the city of Rome as its primary text, investigates how the Augustan "renovation" of Rome is manifested first and foremost in the monuments associated with the ruler: the Mausoleum of Augustus, theater of Marcellus, temple of Apollo on the Palatine, Altar of Augustan Peace, and Forum of Augustus, as well as many others. Understanding of the material remains themselves is supplemented by historical and literary texts dating to Augustus's reign, as well as by a consideration of contemporary research and controversies in the field.

ART HISTORY

130.  Introduction to the Arts of Ancient Mexico and Peru
Susan Wegner
A chronological survey of the arts created by major cultures of ancient Mexico and Peru. Mesoamerican cultures studied include the Olmec, Teotihuacan, the Maya, and the Aztec up through the arrival of the Europeans. South American cultures such as Chavin, Naca, and Inca are examined. Painting, sculpture, and architecture are considered in the context of religion and society. Readings in translation include Mayan myth and chronicles of the conquest.

273.  African Art: Masks and Masquerades
Olubukola Gbadegesin
Masquerades are a major element of West African visual culture. They combine dramatic costumes with improvised bodily performance to create dynamic and interactive events that are rooted in religious belief systems, rites of passage, ancestor veneration, politics, and other sociocultural concerns. Surveys the masking traditions of several ethnic groups in West Africa, paying special attention to the forms and functions of the masquerades. Students learn about the processes through which these performances are executed by the maskers and experienced by audiences. Looks briefly at how these masquerades have been channeled in contemporary African music, theatrical plays, and films.

ASIAN STUDIES

204.  Globalization and Identity in the Himalayas
Jan Brunson
Using contemporary ethnographies, traces the ways notions of identity-including global, national, ethnic, caste, and individual-have changed among groups in the Himalayas in response to recent political, economic, and historical circumstances. Focuses on the influence of culture on identity formation and the deployment of identity in a political fashion in the Himalayan region. Topics include Hindu caste and gender hierarchies, constructions of ethnicity, Tibetans and tourists, Sherpas and mountaineers, development ideologies, and consumerism.

212.  Writing China from Afar
Belinda Kong
The telling of a nation's history is often the concern not only of historical writings but also literary ones. Examines contemporary diaspora literature on three shaping moments of twentieth-century China: the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937-45), the Cultural Revolution (1966-76), and the 1989 Tiananmen democracy movement and massacre. Focuses on authors born and raised in China but since dispersed into various Western locales, particularly the United States, England, and France. Critical issues include the role of the Chinese diaspora in the historiography of World War II, particularly the Nanjing Massacre; the functions and hazards of Chinese exilic literature, such as the genre of Cultural Revolution memoirs, in Western markets today; and more generally, the relationship between history, literature, and the cultural politics of diasporic representations of origin. Authors may include Shan Sa, Dai Sijie, Hong Ying, Yan Geling, Zheng Yi, Yiyun Li, Gao Xingjian, Ha Jin, Annie Wang, and Ma Jian. (Formerly English 283.)

226.  Religion and Political Violence in South Asia
Sunil Goonasekera
Religion is a universal phenomenon that touches, if not dominates, daily life and is a force that can compel people to be both perpetrators and victims of violence. Sociological and anthropological studies point to social, political, economic, cultural, legal, and psychological facts that propel individuals and groups to use violence and justify its use by bringing violence into a religious context. Seeks to understand the relationship between religion and violence and the causes and effects of that relationship. Specifically addresses these issues in South Asian cultural systems.

233.  South Asian Popular Culture
Dhiraj Murthy
Examines transnational South Asian popular culture (encompassing Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, and Sri Lanka), as a medium to understand larger sociological themes, including diaspora, "homeland," globalization, identity, class, gender, and exoticization. Music, film, and fashion are the prime cultural modes explored. Largely structured around specific "South Asian" cultural products-such as Bhangra, Asian electronic music, and Bollywood-and their circulation between the subcontinent and South Asian diasporic communities (particularly in Britain).

246.  The Fantastic and Demonic in Japanese Literature
Vyjayanthi Selinger
From possessing spirits and serpentine creatures to hungry ghosts and spectral visions, Japanese literary history is alive with supernatural beings. The focus of study ranges from the earliest times to modernity, examining these motifs in both historical and theoretical contexts. Readings pose the following broad questions: How do representations of the supernatural function in both creation myths of the ancient past and the rational narratives of the modern nation? What is the relationship between liminal beings and a society's notion of purity? How may we understand the uncanny return of dead spirits in medieval Japanese drama? How does the construction of demonic female sexuality vary between medieval and modern Japan? Draws on various genres of representation, from legends and novels to drama, paintings, and cinema. Students develop an appreciation of the hold that creatures from the "other" side maintain over our cultural and social imagination.

275.  The Making of Modern China: 1550 to Present
Lawrence Zhang
An overview of the changes and transformations in China beginning from the commercial revolution in the sixteenth century and ending at the second commercial revolution in the present day. Topics include political and intellectual changes, the increasing exchange between China and the Western world, challenges from and responses to imperialism, as well as social and cultural transformations, with a thematic emphasis on the changing definition of "China" and its place in the world. Discussions and assignments based on primary source materials.

284.  The Emergence of Modern Japan
Thomas Conlan
What constitutes a modern state? How durable are cultures and civilizations? Examines the patterns of culture in a state that managed to expel European missionaries in the seventeenth century, and came to embrace all things Western as being "civilized" in the mid-nineteenth century. Compares the unique and vibrant culture of Tokugawa Japan with the rapid program of late-nineteenth-century industrialization, which resulted in imperialism, international wars and, ultimately, the postwar recovery.

CLASSICS

102.  Introduction to Ancient Greek Culture
Jennifer Kosak
Introduces students to the study of the literature and culture of ancient Greece. Examines different Greek responses to issues such as religion and the role of gods in human existence, heroism, the natural world, the individual and society, and competition. Considers forms of Greek rationalism, the flourishing of various literary and artistic media, Greek experimentation with different political systems, and concepts of Hellenism and barbarism. Investigates not only what we do and do not know about ancient Greece, but also the types of evidence and methodologies with which we construct this knowledge. Evidence is drawn primarily from the works of authors such as Homer, Sappho, Herodotus, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Thucydides, Aristophanes, Plato, and Hippocrates, but attention is also given to documentary and artistic sources. All readings are done in translation.

202.  Augustan Rome
Barbara Boyd
Upon his ascent to power after a century of war, Rome's first princeps, Augustus, launched a program of cultural reformation and restoration that was to have a profound and enduring effect upon every aspect of life in the empire, from fashions in entertainment, decoration, and art, to religious and political habits and customs. Using the city of Rome as its primary text, investigates how the Augustan "renovation" of Rome is manifested first and foremost in the monuments associated with the ruler: the Mausoleum of Augustus, theater of Marcellus, temple of Apollo on the Palatine, Altar of Augustan Peace, and Forum of Augustus, as well as many others. Understanding of the material remains themselves is supplemented by historical and literary texts dating to Augustus's reign, as well as by a consideration of contemporary research and controversies in the field.

ENGLISH

273.  Writing China from Afar
Belinda Kong
The telling of a nation's history is often the concern not only of historical writings but also literary ones. Examines contemporary diaspora literature on three shaping moments of twentieth-century China: the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937-45), the Cultural Revolution (1966-76), and the 1989 Tiananmen democracy movement and massacre. Focuses on authors born and raised in China but since dispersed into various Western locales, particularly the United States, England, and France. Critical issues include the role of the Chinese diaspora in the historiography of World War II, particularly the Nanjing Massacre; the functions and hazards of Chinese exilic literature, such as the genre of Cultural Revolution memoirs, in Western markets today; and more generally, the relationship between history, literature, and the cultural politics of diasporic representations of origin. Authors may include Shan Sa, Dai Sijie, Hong Ying, Yan Geling, Zheng Yi, Yiyun Li, Gao Xingjian, Ha Jin, Annie Wang, and Ma Jian. (Formerly English 283.)

285.  Global Fiction and "The Great Game"
Hilary Thompson
Examines recent Anglophone global fiction's return to the "Great Game" metaphor-originally referring to Britain and Russia's 1813-1907 imperial rivalry over central Asia-now revived in contemporary works that, playing off of past genres of espionage and adventure, figure global politics as a competitive game and imagine its space as a playing field. Considers the effects of colonialism, globalization, and 9/11 on this literature as well as, conversely, this literature's influence on our perceptions of global politics. Authors may include Rushdie, Ghosh, Norbu, Aslam, Khan, and Shamsie.

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

257.  Anthropology and the Environment
Jonathan Padwe
Explores anthropological approaches to the natural world and applies anthropological forms of investigation to environmental issues. Topics include indigenous peoples' environmental management practices, common property resource management, deforestation, conflicts over natural resources, and the cultural politics of conservation. Covers a series of approaches, from ecological anthropology and human/cultural ecology to political economy, political ecology, and the politics of representation within environmental struggles. Focuses on environmental issues in Asia, Africa, and Latin America, with specific case studies drawn from India and South America's Amazon Basin providing a comparative perspective.

FILM STUDIES

315.  New Waves in the New World: Latin American Cinema
Sarah Childress
Focuses on two "new waves" of film in Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, and Mexico: 1960-1970 and 2000-2010. Explores the works of Glauber Rocha, Tomas Gutierrez Alea, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, Lucrecia Martel, and others to examine how their films function as cultural, historical, political, and economic products that characterize distinct sensibilities and points of view. Also looks at the place of these films within the contexts of film history and world cinema. Attendance at weekly evening screenings is required.

FRENCH

208.  Contemporary France through the Media
Charlotte Daniels
An introduction to contemporary France through newspapers, magazines, television, music, and film. Emphasis is on enhancing communicative proficiency in French and increasing cultural understanding prior to study abroad in France or another Francophone country. Conducted in French.

208.  Contemporary France through the Media
Annelle Curulla
An introduction to contemporary France through newspapers, magazines, television, music, and film. Emphasis is on enhancing communicative proficiency in French and increasing cultural understanding prior to study abroad in France or another Francophone country. Conducted in French.

210.  Introduction to the Study and Criticism of Modern French Literature
Karen Lindo
Introduces students to the literary tradition of the French-speaking world from 1789 to the present. Focus on major authors and literary movements in historical and cultural context. Conducted in French.

211.  Introduction to the Study and Criticism of Francophone Literature
Hanetha Vete-Congolo
Introduces students to the literary tradition of the contemporary Francophone world. Focuses on major authors and literary movements in historical and cultural context. Conducted in French.

GENDER AND WOMEN'S STUDIES

211.  Muslim Women, Islam, and Feminism
Samaa Abdurraqib
Interrogates commonly held beliefs about how Islam regards Muslim women. A broad range of Muslim women, some who identify as feminist, others who do not, consider Islam crucial to their gendered identity. There are also feminist women who were born Muslim, some of whom continue to practice Islam, others who do not, who consider Islam as oppressing their gendered identity. Whatever their positions, it is crucial that these women discuss their relationships, as women, to Islam. In this current historical and cultural moment, critics and proponents of Islam often speak on behalf of Muslim women, while Muslim women remain silent. Readings include novels and poetry by Mohja Kahf, memoirs by Leila Ahmed and Fatima Mernissi, and a wide variety of other articles and texts written by Muslim women about their religious practices, their feminist practices, and how these practices affect their lives and perspectives.

243.  Russia's "Others": Siberia and Central Asia through Film and Literature
Jane Knox-Voina
Films, music, short stories, folklore, and art are analyzed for the construction of national identity of Asian peoples from the Caucasus to the Siberian Bering Straits-Russia and the Former Central Asia (the "stans" and Mongolia). Themes: Multicultural conflicts along the Silk Road, the transit zone linking West to East. Changing roles of Asian women as cornerstone for nations. Survival and role of indigenous peoples in solving cultural, economic, and geopolitical issues facing the twenty-first century. Arrival of "outsiders": from early traders and Siberian settlers to exiled convicts; from early conquerors to despotic Bolshevik rulers, from Genghis Khan to Stalin. Impact of Soviet collectivization, industrialization, and modernism on traditional beliefs, the environment, subsistence indigenous cultures, and Eastern spiritualities (Islam, shamanism). Questions how film and literature both tell and shape the story of "nations." Films include S. Bodrov's Prisoner of the Mountains (Caucasus) and Mongol; V. Pudovskin's Storm Over Asia, A. Kurosawa's Dersu Uzala, N. Mikhalkov's Close to Eden, A. Konchalovsky's Siberiade, G. Omarova's Schizo. Note: May be counted towards a minor in film studies.

GERMAN

308.  Introduction to German Literature and Culture
Jill Smith
Designed to be an introduction to the critical reading of texts by genre (e.g., prose fiction and nonfiction, lyric poetry, drama, opera, film) in the context of German intellectual, political, and social history. Focuses on various themes and periods. Develops students' sensitivity to generic structures and introduces terminology for describing and analyzing texts in historical and cross-cultural contexts. Weekly individual sessions with the Teaching Fellow from the Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitat-Mainz.

396.  Vienna, 1890-1914
Steven Cerf
An examination of representative shorter literary works (i.e., Novellen, dramas, poetry, essays, etc.) of such diverse, psychologically oriented authors as Schnitzler, Freud, Hofmannsthal, Trakl, Kraus, and Musil in historical and cultural contexts. Three basic areas explored: (1) how and why turn-of-the-century Vienna became the home of modern psychiatry; (2) the myriad ways in which imaginative writers creatively interacted with leading composers, visual artists, and philosophers of the era; (3) the extent to which such cinematic directors as Ophüls, Reed, and Schlondorff were able to capture Viennese intellectual and creative vibrancy for the screen.

397.  Global Germany?
Jill Smith
The fall of the Berlin Wall and the concomitant end of the Cold War ushered in what many cultural critics call "the era of globalization." An exploration of how contemporary German culture (1990-present) grapples with both the possibilities and uncertainties presented by globalization. Examines a myriad of cultural texts-films, audio plays, dramas, short fiction, novels, photographs, Web sites-as well as mass events (i.e., the Love Parade, the 2006 World Cup) within their political, social, and economic contexts to show how Germany's troubled past continues to affect the role it plays on the global stage and how its changing demographics-increased urbanization and ethnic diversity-have altered its cultural and literary landscape. Critically considers issues such as migration, terrorism and genocide, sex tourism, the formation of the European Union and the supposed decline of the nation-state. Frequent short writings, participation in debates, and a final research project based upon a relevant topic of individual interest are required.

GOVERNMENT

222.  Politics and Societies in Africa
Ericka Albaugh
Surveys societies and politics in sub-Saharan Africa, seeking to understand the sources of current conditions and the prospects for political stability and economic growth. Looks briefly at pre-colonial society and colonial influence on state-construction in Africa, and concentrates on three broad phases in Africa's contemporary political development: (1) independence and consolidation of authoritarian rule; (2) economic decline and challenges to authoritarianism; (3) democratization and civil conflict. Presumes no prior knowledge of the region.

225.  The Politics of the European Union
Laura Henry
Explores the historical foundations, scope, and consequences of European political and economic integration since 1951. Examines how the European Union's supranational political institutions, law, and policies have developed and how they affect the domestic politics of member states. Considers challenges faced by the European Union: enlargement to include Eastern European members, the loss of national sovereignty and the "democratic deficit," the creation of a European identity, and the development of a coordinated foreign policy.

GREEK

204.  Homer
Jennifer Kosak
An introduction to the poetry of Homer. Focuses both on reading and on interpreting Homeric epic.

HISTORY

125.  Entering Modernity: European Jewry
Susan Tananbaum
Explores Jewish life through the lenses of history, religion, and ethnicity and examines the processes by which governments and sections of the Jewish community attempted to incorporate Jews and Judaism into European society. Surveys social and economic transformations of Jews, cultural challenges of modernity, varieties of modern Jewish religious expression, political ideologies, the Holocaust, establishment of Israel, and American Jewry through primary and secondary sources, lectures, films, and class discussions.

264.  Conquest, Colonialism, and Independence: Africa since 1880
Olufemi Vaughan
Focuses on conquest, colonialism, and its legacies in sub-Saharan Africa; the violent process of colonial pacification, examined from European and African perspectives; the different ways of consolidating colonial rule and African resistance to colonial rule, from Maji Maji to Mau Mau; and African nationalism and independence, as experienced by Africa's nationalist leaders, from Kwame Nkrumah to Jomo Kenyatta, and their critics. Concludes with the limits of independence, mass disenchantment, the rise of the predatory post-colonial state, genocide in the Great Lakes, and the wars of Central Africa.

266.  History of Mexico
Allen Wells
A survey of Mexican history from pre-Columbian times to the present. Topics include the evolving character of indigenous societies, the nature of the Encounter, the colonial legacy, the chaotic nineteenth century, the Mexican Revolution, and United States-Mexican relations. Contemporary problems are also addressed.

269.  After Apartheid: Southern African History and Historiography
David Gordon
Seminar.Investigates the diverse representations and uses of the past in South Africa. Begins with the difficulties in developing a critical and conciliatory version of the past in post-apartheid South Africa during and after the much-discussed Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Then turns to diverse historical episodes and sites of memory from the Great Trek to the inauguration of Nelson Mandela to explore issues of identity and memory from the perspectives of South Africa's various peoples.

275.  The Making of Modern China: 1550 to Present
Lawrence Zhang
An overview of the changes and transformations in China beginning from the commercial revolution in the sixteenth century and ending at the second commercial revolution in the present day. Topics include political and intellectual changes, the increasing exchange between China and the Western world, challenges from and responses to imperialism, as well as social and cultural transformations, with a thematic emphasis on the changing definition of "China" and its place in the world. Discussions and assignments based on primary source materials.

284.  The Emergence of Modern Japan
Thomas Conlan
What constitutes a modern state? How durable are cultures and civilizations? Examines the patterns of culture in a state that managed to expel European missionaries in the seventeenth century, and came to embrace all things Western as being "civilized" in the mid-nineteenth century. Compares the unique and vibrant culture of Tokugawa Japan with the rapid program of late-nineteenth-century industrialization, which resulted in imperialism, international wars and, ultimately, the postwar recovery.

288.  The Cold War
David Hecht
Examines the history of the Cold War. Primarily considers United States politics and culture of the era, focusing on issues such as the atomic bomb, the arms race, McCarthyism, civil rights, 1960s student protests, the Vietnam War, and the myriad ways in which all aspects of American culture-from film to literature to science to religion-were affected by the Cold War. Uses films-both current and from the era-to explore changing notions of Cold War history and the contemporary political and ideological implications of those ideas.

ITALIAN

208.  Introduction to Contemporary Italy: Dalla Marcia alla Vespa
Davida Gavioli
In the recent past, Italy has experienced violent political, economic, and cultural changes. In short succession, it experienced Fascist dictatorship, the Second World War, the Holocaust, and Civil War, a passage from Monarchy to Republic, a transformation from a peasant existence to an industrialized society, giving rise to a revolution in cinema, fashion, and transportation. How did all this happen? Who were the people behind these events? What effect did they have on everyday life? Answers these questions, exploring the history and the culture of Italy from Fascism to contemporary Italy, passing through the economic boom, the "Years of Lead," and the Mafia. Students have the opportunity to "relive" the events of the twentieth century, assuming the identity of real-life men and women. Along with historical and cultural information, students read newspaper articles, letters, excerpts from novels and short stories from authors such as Calvino, Levi, Ginzburg, and others, and see films by directors like Scola, Taviani, De Sica, and Giordana.

LATIN

204.  Studies in Latin Literature
Michael Nerdahl
An introduction to different genres and themes in Latin literature. The subject matter and authors covered may change from year to year (e.g., selections from Virgil's Aeneid and Livy's History, or from Lucretius, Ovid, and Cicero), but attention is always given to the historical and literary context of the authors read. While the primary focus is on reading Latin texts, some readings from Latin literature in translation are also assigned. Equivalent of Latin 203 or three to four years of high school Latin is required.

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES

130.  Introduction to the Arts of Ancient Mexico and Peru
Susan Wegner
A chronological survey of the arts created by major cultures of ancient Mexico and Peru. Mesoamerican cultures studied include the Olmec, Teotihuacan, the Maya, and the Aztec up through the arrival of the Europeans. South American cultures such as Chavin, Naca, and Inca are examined. Painting, sculpture, and architecture are considered in the context of religion and society. Readings in translation include Mayan myth and chronicles of the conquest.

136.  Black Musics in Latin America and the Caribbean
Michael Quintero
An introduction to various Afro-Latin American and Afro-Caribbean musical forms and some of the issues and debates that surround them. Students examine case studies from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries. Some central themes include similarities and differences in black identity across the Americas, the relative importance of African retentions and New World innovations in the formation of these musical forms, the nature of cultural mixture with indigenous and European forms, the role of music in black religion, and musical dialogues between differently located black populations in the Americas.

209.  Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater
Gustavo Faveron-Patriau
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish.

209.  Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater
John Turner
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish.

210.  Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative
Janice Jaffe
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.

210.  Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative
Esmeralda Ulloa
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.

213.  Introduction to the Study and Criticism of Francophone Literature
Hanetha Vete-Congolo
Introduces students to the literary tradition of the contemporary Francophone world. Focuses on major authors and literary movements in historical and cultural context. Conducted in French.

266.  History of Mexico
Allen Wells
A survey of Mexican history from pre-Columbian times to the present. Topics include the evolving character of indigenous societies, the nature of the Encounter, the colonial legacy, the chaotic nineteenth century, the Mexican Revolution, and United States-Mexican relations. Contemporary problems are also addressed.

316.  New Waves in the New World: Latin American Cinema
Sarah Childress
Focuses on two "new waves" of film in Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, and Mexico: 1960-1970 and 2000-2010. Explores the works of Glauber Rocha, Tomas Gutierrez Alea, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, Lucrecia Martel, and others to examine how their films function as cultural, historical, political, and economic products that characterize distinct sensibilities and points of view. Also looks at the place of these films within the contexts of film history and world cinema. Attendance at weekly evening screenings is required.

MUSIC

136.  Black Musics in Latin America and the Caribbean
Michael Quintero
An introduction to various Afro-Latin American and Afro-Caribbean musical forms and some of the issues and debates that surround them. Students examine case studies from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries. Some central themes include similarities and differences in black identity across the Americas, the relative importance of African retentions and New World innovations in the formation of these musical forms, the nature of cultural mixture with indigenous and European forms, the role of music in black religion, and musical dialogues between differently located black populations in the Americas.

RELIGION

125.  Entering Modernity: European Jewry
Susan Tananbaum
Explores Jewish life through the lenses of history, religion, and ethnicity and examines the processes by which governments and sections of the Jewish community attempted to incorporate Jews and Judaism into European society. Surveys social and economic transformations of Jews, cultural challenges of modernity, varieties of modern Jewish religious expression, political ideologies, the Holocaust, establishment of Israel, and American Jewry through primary and secondary sources, lectures, films, and class discussions.

211.  Muslim Women, Islam, and Feminism
Samaa Abdurraqib
Interrogates commonly held beliefs about how Islam regards Muslim women. A broad range of Muslim women, some who identify as feminist, others who do not, consider Islam crucial to their gendered identity. There are also feminist women who were born Muslim, some of whom continue to practice Islam, others who do not, who consider Islam as oppressing their gendered identity. Whatever their positions, it is crucial that these women discuss their relationships, as women, to Islam. In this current historical and cultural moment, critics and proponents of Islam often speak on behalf of Muslim women, while Muslim women remain silent. Readings include novels and poetry by Mohja Kahf, memoirs by Leila Ahmed and Fatima Mernissi, and a wide variety of other articles and texts written by Muslim women about their religious practices, their feminist practices, and how these practices affect their lives and perspectives.

225.  Religion and Political Violence in South Asia
Sunil Goonasekera
Religion is a universal phenomenon that touches, if not dominates, daily life and is a force that can compel people to be both perpetrators and victims of violence. Sociological and anthropological studies point to social, political, economic, cultural, legal, and psychological facts that propel individuals and groups to use violence and justify its use by bringing violence into a religious context. Seeks to understand the relationship between religion and violence and the causes and effects of that relationship. Specifically addresses these issues in South Asian cultural systems.

RUSSIAN

251.  Russia's "Others": Siberia and Central Asia through Film and Literature
Jane Knox-Voina
Films, music, short stories, folklore, and art are analyzed for the construction of national identity of Asian peoples from the Caucasus to the Siberian Bering Straits-Russia and the Former Central Asia (the "stans" and Mongolia). Themes: Multicultural conflicts along the Silk Road, the transit zone linking West to East. Changing roles of Asian women as cornerstone for nations. Survival and role of indigenous peoples in solving cultural, economic, and geopolitical issues facing the twenty-first century. Arrival of "outsiders": from early traders and Siberian settlers to exiled convicts; from early conquerors to despotic Bolshevik rulers, from Genghis Khan to Stalin. Impact of Soviet collectivization, industrialization, and modernism on traditional beliefs, the environment, subsistence indigenous cultures, and Eastern spiritualities (Islam, shamanism). Questions how film and literature both tell and shape the story of "nations." Films include S. Bodrov's Prisoner of the Mountains (Caucasus) and Mongol; V. Pudovskin's Storm Over Asia, A. Kurosawa's Dersu Uzala, N. Mikhalkov's Close to Eden, A. Konchalovsky's Siberiade, G. Omarova's Schizo. Note: May be counted towards a minor in film studies.

SOCIOLOGY

224.  Global Health Matters
Susan Bell
Introduces students to international health, healing, and medicine from individual experiences in local contexts to global practices. Locates health and health care within particular cultural, social, historical, and political circumstances. How do these diverse forces shape the organization of healthcare providers and systems of health care delivery? How do these forces influence people's symptoms, health beliefs, utilization of healthcare, and interactions with healthcare providers? How are local practices of health and healthcare linked to large-scale social and economic structures? Topics include structural violence; global pharmaceuticals; the commodification of bodies, organ trafficking, and organ transplantation; pregnancy and reproduction.

236.  South Asian Popular Culture
Dhiraj Murthy
Examines transnational South Asian popular culture (encompassing Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, and Sri Lanka), as a medium to understand larger sociological themes, including diaspora, "homeland," globalization, identity, class, gender, and exoticization. Music, film, and fashion are the prime cultural modes explored. Largely structured around specific "South Asian" cultural products-such as Bhangra, Asian electronic music, and Bollywood-and their circulation between the subcontinent and South Asian diasporic communities (particularly in Britain).

SPANISH

209.  Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater
Gustavo Faveron-Patriau
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish.

209.  Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater
John Turner
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish.

210.  Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative
Janice Jaffe
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.

210.  Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative
Esmeralda Ulloa
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.