Emerging Modernisms, American and European Art, 1900–1950

Museum of Art Museum of Art

Exhibition: Emerging Modernisms, American and European Art, 1900–1950

Dates:

Location:

Shaw Ruddock Gallery
This overview of Bowdoin’s collection of artwork from the first half of the twentieth century addresses the development of new visual languages and new philosophical sensibilities as artists explore how to render the ineffable tangible.

Works

"Intelectuals" [sic], 1994, colored pencil, by Beatrice Wood, American.
"Proun 2B," 1921 lithograph by El Lissitzky, Russian, 1890–1941
"Monte Carlo Bond," 1924 (printed 1938), color offset lithograph by Marcel Duchamp, American, 1887–1968

About

The arrival and adoption of new technologies in the first half of the twentieth century brought enormous changes to Europe and the United States. Technological innovations transformed individuals and their relationship to others and the world at large. They included electricity, the telephone, the airplane, and the X-ray. These breakthroughs were accompanied by social revolutions and political conflicts. And they prompted artists to develop new strategies to describe a world in rapid transformation and to articulate both the wonder and trepidation attending to these changes. Artists explored new idioms for describing the visible—and previously invisible—world, which included the use of photography for fine art, an emphasis on color and form, and the emergence of pictorial abstraction.

 

Read the Object Labels