Spring 2015

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ECON 1101A. Principles of Microeconomics.
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. The theory of demand, supply, cost, and market structure is developed and then applied to problems in antitrust policy, environmental quality, energy, education, health, the role of the corporation in society, income distribution, and poverty. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both Economics 1101 (101) and 1102 (102). For proper placement students should fill out the economics placement request form and must be recommended for placement in Economics 1101. Not open to students who have taken Economics 1050.
ECON 1101B. Principles of Microeconomics.
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. The theory of demand, supply, cost, and market structure is developed and then applied to problems in antitrust policy, environmental quality, energy, education, health, the role of the corporation in society, income distribution, and poverty. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both Economics 1101 (101) and 1102 (102). For proper placement students should fill out the economics placement request form and must be recommended for placement in Economics 1101. Not open to students who have taken Economics 1050.
ECON 1101C. Principles of Microeconomics.
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. The theory of demand, supply, cost, and market structure is developed and then applied to problems in antitrust policy, environmental quality, energy, education, health, the role of the corporation in society, income distribution, and poverty. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both Economics 1101 (101) and 1102 (102). For proper placement students should fill out the economics placement request form and must be recommended for placement in Economics 1101. Not open to students who have taken Economics 1050.
ECON 1102A. Principles of Macroeconomics.
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on determinants of the level of national income, prices, and employment. Current problems of inflation and unemployment are explored with the aid of such analysis, and alternative views of the effectiveness of fiscal, monetary, and other governmental policies are analyzed. Attention is given to the sources and consequences of economic growth and to the nature and significance of international linkages through goods and capital markets.
ECON 1102B. Principles of Macroeconomics.
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on determinants of the level of national income, prices, and employment. Current problems of inflation and unemployment are explored with the aid of such analysis, and alternative views of the effectiveness of fiscal, monetary, and other governmental policies are analyzed. Attention is given to the sources and consequences of economic growth and to the nature and significance of international linkages through goods and capital markets.
ECON 1102C. Principles of Macroeconomics.
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on determinants of the level of national income, prices, and employment. Current problems of inflation and unemployment are explored with the aid of such analysis, and alternative views of the effectiveness of fiscal, monetary, and other governmental policies are analyzed. Attention is given to the sources and consequences of economic growth and to the nature and significance of international linkages through goods and capital markets.
ECON 1102D. Principles of Macroeconomics.
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on determinants of the level of national income, prices, and employment. Current problems of inflation and unemployment are explored with the aid of such analysis, and alternative views of the effectiveness of fiscal, monetary, and other governmental policies are analyzed. Attention is given to the sources and consequences of economic growth and to the nature and significance of international linkages through goods and capital markets.
ECON 1201A. Financial Accounting.
Accounting provides information to policy-makers, regulators, decision-makers and investors to facilitate the allocation of resources in society. Develops skills necessary to evaluate an enterprise’s financial position and activities through three primary goals: 1) understanding the concepts and measurements underlying financial statements, 2) developing the skills necessary to analyze financial statements, and 3) understanding the choices enterprises make in reporting the results of their activities. Taught in a blended format involving regular online instruction by faculty from the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth with on-campus instruction and facilitation by a Bowdoin faculty member.
ECON 1201B. Financial Accounting.
Accounting provides information to policy-makers, regulators, decision-makers and investors to facilitate the allocation of resources in society. Develops skills necessary to evaluate an enterprise’s financial position and activities through three primary goals: 1) understanding the concepts and measurements underlying financial statements, 2) developing the skills necessary to analyze financial statements, and 3) understanding the choices enterprises make in reporting the results of their activities. Taught in a blended format involving regular online instruction by faculty from the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth with on-campus instruction and facilitation by a Bowdoin faculty member.
ECON 2212. Labor and Human Resource Economics.
A study of labor market supply and demand, with special emphasis on human resource policies, human capital formation, and wage inequality.
ECON 2228. Natural Resource Economics and Policy.
A study of the economic issues surrounding the existence and use of renewable natural resources (e.g., forestry/land use, fisheries, water, ecosystems, and the effectiveness of antibiotics) and exhaustible resources (such as minerals, fossil fuels, and old growth forest). A basic framework is first developed for determining economically efficient use of resources over time, then extended to consider objectives other than efficiency, as well as the distinguishing biological, ecological, physical, political, and social attributes of each resource. Uncertainty, common property, and various regulatory instruments are discussed, as well as alternatives to government intervention and/or privatization.
ECON 2239. Topics on Asian Economies.
A study of the similarities and differences in growth experience and the level of economic output per person in Asian countries. Explores possible causes of differences in economic paths, with a focus on several important economies, including China and Japan. Also discusses the relationship between the Asian economies and the United States economy.
ECON 2303. Financial Crises.
Presents a historical and theoretical overview of financial crises. Covers models of exchange-rate crises, sovereign debt crises, and banking crises. A particular focus on the financial crisis of 2007-09, with close readings of contemporary accounts on the origins and propagation mechanisms linking this crisis to the “Great Recession.”
ECON 2555A. Microeconomics.
An intermediate-level study of contemporary microeconomic theory. Analysis of the theory of resource allocation and distribution, with major emphasis on systems of markets and prices as a social mechanism for making resource allocation decisions. Topics include the theory of individual choice and demand, the theory of the firm, market equilibrium under competition and monopoly, general equilibrium theory, and welfare economics.
ECON 2555B. Microeconomics.
An intermediate-level study of contemporary microeconomic theory. Analysis of the theory of resource allocation and distribution, with major emphasis on systems of markets and prices as a social mechanism for making resource allocation decisions. Topics include the theory of individual choice and demand, the theory of the firm, market equilibrium under competition and monopoly, general equilibrium theory, and welfare economics.
ECON 2556A. Macroeconomics.
An intermediate-level study of contemporary national income, employment, and inflation theory. Consumption, investment, government receipts, government expenditures, money, and interest rates are examined for their determinants, interrelationships, and role in determining the level of aggregate economic activity. Policy implications are drawn from the analysis.
ECON 2556B. Macroeconomics.
An intermediate-level study of contemporary national income, employment, and inflation theory. Consumption, investment, government receipts, government expenditures, money, and interest rates are examined for their determinants, interrelationships, and role in determining the level of aggregate economic activity. Policy implications are drawn from the analysis.
ECON 2557A. Economic Statistics.
An introduction to the data and statistical methods used in economics. A review of the systems that generate economic data and the accuracy of such data is followed by an examination of the statistical methods used in testing the hypotheses of economic theory, both micro- and macro-. Probability, random variables and their distributions, methods of estimating parameters, hypothesis testing, regression, and correlation are covered. The application of multiple regression to economic problems is stressed. Students who have taken Mathematics 2606 {265} are encouraged to take Economics 3516 {316} instead of this course.
ECON 2557B. Economic Statistics.
An introduction to the data and statistical methods used in economics. A review of the systems that generate economic data and the accuracy of such data is followed by an examination of the statistical methods used in testing the hypotheses of economic theory, both micro- and macro-. Probability, random variables and their distributions, methods of estimating parameters, hypothesis testing, regression, and correlation are covered. The application of multiple regression to economic problems is stressed. Students who have taken Mathematics 2606 {265} are encouraged to take Economics 3516 {316} instead of this course.
ECON 3302. Topics in Finance.
Provides hands-on practice of financial theory using financial modeling. Addresses real-life financial problems using Excel and VBA. Topics include arbitrage pricing theory, capital asset pricing model, portfolio selection, fixed income securities, and option pricing. Builds on materials covered in Economics 2301 {260}.
ECON 3350. Mathematical Economics.
A survey of some of the mathematical techniques used to conduct economic analyses. Topics include utility maximization under uncertainty; solving constrained optimization problems with mathematical programming; optimal control theory; solving complex equations and systems of equations with numerical methods; dynamic programming; and general equilibrium analysis. Students learn to solve problems with MATLAB and other similar programming and statistical software.
ECON 3533. Behavioral Economics.
Seminar. Standard economics (i.e., neoclassical economics) assumes that individuals are self-interested, rational actors, who optimize well-defined, stable objective functions. Behavioral economics is the study of systematic departures from these assumptions, and the implications for economic outcomes. Topics include errors in information-processing and belief formation, behavioral choice under uncertainty (loss aversion, reference dependence), time inconsistent behavior (self-control problems), and social preferences (altruism, fairness, and reciprocity).
ECON 3557. Unconventional Monetary Policy.
Seminar. Considers traditional and unconventional monetary policies to stabilize the economy. First analyzes traditional issues in monetary economics, with particular attention to the effects of inflation and taxation on saving, investment, and output. Then examines the role of unconventional policies, such as the expansion of the Federal Reserve's balance sheet during the “Great Recession.” The results of such recent monetary policies are put in the context of three other "Great" data points: The Great Depression, Great Inflation, and the Great Moderation.