Location: Bowdoin / Economics / Courses

Economics

Spring 2014

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ECON 1101A. Principles of Microeconomics.
Rachel Connelly.

An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. The theory of demand, supply, cost, and market structure is developed and then applied to problems in antitrust policy, environmental quality, energy, education, health, the role of the corporation in society, income distribution, and poverty. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both Economics 1101 (101) and 1102 (102).

ECON 1101B. Principles of Microeconomics.
Guillermo Herrera.

An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. The theory of demand, supply, cost, and market structure is developed and then applied to problems in antitrust policy, environmental quality, energy, education, health, the role of the corporation in society, income distribution, and poverty. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both Economics 1101 (101) and 1102 (102).

ECON 1101C. Principles of Microeconomics.
Zorina Khan.

An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. The theory of demand, supply, cost, and market structure is developed and then applied to problems in antitrust policy, environmental quality, energy, education, health, the role of the corporation in society, income distribution, and poverty. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both Economics 1101 (101) and 1102 (102).

ECON 1102A. Principles of Macroeconomics.
Jonathan Goldstein.

An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on determinants of the level of national income, prices, and employment. Current problems of inflation and unemployment are explored with the aid of such analysis, and alternative views of the effectiveness of fiscal, monetary, and other governmental policies are analyzed. Attention is given to the sources and consequences of economic growth and to the nature and significance of international linkages through goods and capital markets.

ECON 1102B. Principles of Macroeconomics.
Jonathan Goldstein.

An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on determinants of the level of national income, prices, and employment. Current problems of inflation and unemployment are explored with the aid of such analysis, and alternative views of the effectiveness of fiscal, monetary, and other governmental policies are analyzed. Attention is given to the sources and consequences of economic growth and to the nature and significance of international linkages through goods and capital markets.

ECON 1102C. Principles of Macroeconomics.
Yao Tang.

An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on determinants of the level of national income, prices, and employment. Current problems of inflation and unemployment are explored with the aid of such analysis, and alternative views of the effectiveness of fiscal, monetary, and other governmental policies are analyzed. Attention is given to the sources and consequences of economic growth and to the nature and significance of international linkages through goods and capital markets.

ECON 1102D. Principles of Macroeconomics.
Gregory DeCoster.

An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on determinants of the level of national income, prices, and employment. Current problems of inflation and unemployment are explored with the aid of such analysis, and alternative views of the effectiveness of fiscal, monetary, and other governmental policies are analyzed. Attention is given to the sources and consequences of economic growth and to the nature and significance of international linkages through goods and capital markets.

ECON 2228. Natural Resource Economics and Policy.
Guillermo Herrera.

A study of the economic issues surrounding the existence and use of renewable natural resources (e.g., forestry/land use, fisheries, water, ecosystems, and the effectiveness of antibiotics) and exhaustible resources (such as minerals, fossil fuels, and old growth forest). A basic framework is first developed for determining economically efficient use of resources over time, then extended to consider objectives other than efficiency, as well as the distinguishing biological, ecological, physical, political, and social attributes of each resource. Uncertainty, common property, and various regulatory instruments are discussed, as well as alternatives to government intervention and/or privatization.

ECON 2323. The Economics of Information.
Daniel Stone.

Many standard economic models assume perfect and complete information. The economics of information explores how economic phenomena can be better understood by relaxing this assumption. Topics include decision-making under risk, adverse selection, moral hazard, information processing/belief updating, communication, the efficient market hypothesis, firm competition and reputation, advertising and media. Develops and uses selected tools from probability theory and game theory.

ECON 2555. Microeconomics.
Rachel Connelly.

An intermediate-level study of contemporary microeconomic theory. Analysis of the theory of resource allocation and distribution, with major emphasis on systems of markets and prices as a social mechanism for making resource allocation decisions. Topics include the theory of individual choice and demand, the theory of the firm, market equilibrium under competition and monopoly, general equilibrium theory, and welfare economics.

ECON 2556. Macroeconomics.
Yun Kim.

An intermediate-level study of contemporary national income, employment, and inflation theory. Consumption, investment, government receipts, government expenditures, money, and interest rates are examined for their determinants, interrelationships, and role in determining the level of aggregate economic activity. Policy implications are drawn from the analysis.

ECON 2557A. Economic Statistics.
Deborah DeGraff.

An introduction to the data and statistical methods used in economics. A review of the systems that generate economic data and the accuracy of such data is followed by an examination of the statistical methods used in testing the hypotheses of economic theory, both micro- and macro-. Probability, random variables and their distributions, methods of estimating parameters, hypothesis testing, regression, and correlation are covered. The application of multiple regression to economic problems is stressed. Students who have taken Mathematics 2606 (265})are encouraged to take Economics 3516 (316) instead of this course.

ECON 2557B. Economic Statistics.
Deborah DeGraff.

An introduction to the data and statistical methods used in economics. A review of the systems that generate economic data and the accuracy of such data is followed by an examination of the statistical methods used in testing the hypotheses of economic theory, both micro- and macro-. Probability, random variables and their distributions, methods of estimating parameters, hypothesis testing, regression, and correlation are covered. The application of multiple regression to economic problems is stressed. Students who have taken Mathematics 2606 (265})are encouraged to take Economics 3516 (316) instead of this course.

ECON 3302. Topics in Finance.
Bing Chen.

A continuation of Economics 2301 (260) taught using the tools of standard Intermediate Microeconomics.

ECON 3525. Economic Growth.
Yao Tang.

Seminar. Vast differences in nations’ long-run growth experience significantly affect the degree of inequality and overall welfare of the global population. Offers both theoretical and empirical analyses of macro determinants of economic growth. Explores the role of such key factors as the accumulation of physical capital and human capital, productivity and technology, natural resources, openness to trade and capital flow, institutions, culture, and geography.

ECON 3533. Behavioral Economics.
Daniel Stone.

Seminar. Standard economics (i.e., neoclassical economics) assumes that individuals are self-interested, rational actors, who optimize well-defined, stable objective functions. Behavioral economics is the study of systematic departures from these assumptions, and the implications for economic outcomes. Topics include errors in information-processing and belief formation, behavioral choice under uncertainty (loss aversion, reference dependence), time inconsistent behavior (self-control problems), and social preferences (altruism, fairness and reciprocity).

ECON 3540. Law and Economics.
Zorina Khan.

Seminar. Law and economics is one of the most rapidly growing areas in the social sciences. The field applies the concepts and empirical methods of economics to further our understanding of the legal system. Explores the economic analysis of law and legal institutions, including the economics of torts, contracts, property, crime, courts, and dispute resolution. Also focuses on topics in law and economics such as antitrust and regulation, corporations, the family, labor markets, product liability, and intellectual property. Students are introduced to online sources of information in law, and are required to apply economic reasoning to analyze landmark lawsuits in each of these areas. Not open to students who have credit for Economics 3541 (341).