Location: Bowdoin / Suzanne B. Lovett

Psychology

Suzanne Lovett

Associate Professor of Psychology

Contact Information

slovett@bowdoin.edu
207-725-3153
Psychology

Kanbar Hall - 225


Teaching this semester

PSYC 1101. Introduction to Psychology

Suzanne Lovett
A general introduction to the major concerns of contemporary psychology, including physiological psychology, perception, learning, cognition, language, development, personality, intelligence, and abnormal and social behavior. Recommended for first- and second-year students. Juniors and seniors should enroll in the spring semester.

PSYC 2520. Data Analysis

Suzanne Lovett
An introduction to the use of descriptive and inferential statistics and design in behavioral research. Weekly laboratory work in computerized data analysis. Required of majors no later than the junior year, and preferably by the sophomore year.



lovett

Education

  • A.B. Bowdoin College
  • Ph.D. Stanford University

Professor Lovett specializes in cognitive development. She teaches courses in child development, language development, and statistics. Her research interests are children's conception of probability and randomness and their ability to distinguish between the mental processes of comprehension and memory.




Pillow, B.H. & Lovett, S.B. (1998). "He forgot": Young children's use of cognitive explanations for another person's mistakes. Merrill-Palmer Quarterly.
Full Text

Lovett, S.B. & Pillow, B.H. (1996). Development of the ability to distinguish between comprehension and memory: Evidence from goal-state evaluation tasks. Journal of Educational Psychology, 88, 596-562.

Lovett, S.B. & Pillow, B.H. (1995). Development of the ability to distinguish between comprehension and memory: Evidence from strategy-selection tasks. Journal of Educational Psychology, 87, 523-526.

Lovett, S.B. & Flavell, J.H. (1990). Understanding and remembering: Children's knowledge about the differential effects of strategy and task variables on comprehension and memorization, Child Development, 61, 1842-1858.