Fall 2014 Courses

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CHEM 1058. Drug Discovery.
The process of drug discovery of medicinal compounds has evolved over millennia, from the shaman’s use of medicinal herbs to the highly evolved techniques of rational design and high-throughput screening used by today’s pharmaceutical industry. Examines past and present approaches to drug discovery, with an emphasis on the natural world as a source of drugs, historical examples of drug discovery, and the experiments undertaken to validate a drug. Encourages students to take initial steps to identify novel therapeutics and to directly compare conventional versus herbal remedies in integrated laboratory exercises. Assumes no background in science. Not open to students who have credit for a chemistry course numbered 1000 (100) or higher.
CHEM 1101A. Introductory Chemistry I.
The first course in a two-semester introductory college chemistry sequence. Introduction to the states of matter and their properties, stoichiometry and the mole unit, properties of gases, thermochemistry, atomic structure, and periodic properties of the elements. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week. To ensure proper placement, students must take the chemistry placement examination and must be recommended for placement in Chemistry 1101 {101}. Students continuing in chemistry will take Chemistry 1102 {102}, not Chemistry 1109 {109102}, as their next chemistry course.
CHEM 1101B. Introductory Chemistry I.
The first course in a two-semester introductory college chemistry sequence. Introduction to the states of matter and their properties, stoichiometry and the mole unit, properties of gases, thermochemistry, atomic structure, and periodic properties of the elements. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week. To ensure proper placement, students must take the chemistry placement examination and must be recommended for placement in Chemistry 1101 {101}. Students continuing in chemistry will take Chemistry 1102 {102}, not Chemistry 1109 {109102}, as their next chemistry course.
CHEM 1109A. General Chemistry.
A one-semester introductory chemistry course. Introduction to models of atomic structure, chemical bonding, and intermolecular forces; characterization of chemical systems at equilibrium and spontaneous processes; the rates of chemical reactions; and special topics. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week. Students who have taken Chemistry 1102 (102) may not take Chemistry 1109 (109) for credit. To ensure proper placement, students must take the chemistry placement examination and must be recommended for placement in Chemistry 1109 (109).
CHEM 1109B. General Chemistry.
A one-semester introductory chemistry course. Introduction to models of atomic structure, chemical bonding, and intermolecular forces; characterization of chemical systems at equilibrium and spontaneous processes; the rates of chemical reactions; and special topics. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week. Students who have taken Chemistry 1102 (102) may not take Chemistry 1109 (109) for credit. To ensure proper placement, students must take the chemistry placement examination and must be recommended for placement in Chemistry 1109 (109).
CHEM 2100. Chemical Analysis.
Methods of separating and quantifying inorganic and organic compounds using volumetric, spectrophotometric, electrometric, and chromatographic techniques are covered. Chemical equilibria and the statistical analysis of data are addressed. Lectures and four hours of laboratory work per week.
CHEM 2250A. Organic Chemistry I.
Introduction to the chemistry of the compounds of carbon. Describes bonding, conformations, and stereochemistry of small organic molecules. Reactions of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, and alcohols are discussed. Kinetic and thermodynamic data are used to formulate reaction mechanisms. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week.
CHEM 2250B. Organic Chemistry I.
Introduction to the chemistry of the compounds of carbon. Describes bonding, conformations, and stereochemistry of small organic molecules. Reactions of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, and alcohols are discussed. Kinetic and thermodynamic data are used to formulate reaction mechanisms. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week.
CHEM 2250C. Organic Chemistry I.
Introduction to the chemistry of the compounds of carbon. Describes bonding, conformations, and stereochemistry of small organic molecules. Reactions of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, and alcohols are discussed. Kinetic and thermodynamic data are used to formulate reaction mechanisms. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week.
CHEM 2310. Fundamentals of Biochemistry.
This course focuses on the fundamentals of biochemistry. Topics include the influence of water on biomolecules; how structure dictates function; properties of the major classes of biomolecules (proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids); enzyme mechanisms, kinetics, and regulation; metabolic transformations; energetics and metabolic control. Emphasis will be on how the physical and chemical properties of the universe impact living systems. This course does NOT satisfy a requirement for the biochemistry major and it is not open to students who have credit for Chemistry 2320 {232}. Students who intend to enroll in Chemistry 2320 {232} should not register for Chemistry 2310 {231}.
CHEM 2510. Chemical Thermodynamics and Kinetics.
Thermodynamics and its application to chemical changes and equilibria that occur in the gaseous, solid, and liquid states. The behavior of systems at equilibrium and chemical kinetics are related to molecular properties by means of statistical mechanics and the laws of thermodynamics. Lectures and four hours of laboratory work per week. Mathematics 1800 {181} is recommended.
CHEM 3060. Transformation of Organic Chemicals in the Environment.
Human activities result in the intentional or inadvertent release of organic chemicals into the natural environment. Interconnected physical, chemical, and biological processes influence the environmental fate of chemicals and the extent human and ecosystem exposure. Focuses on the thermodynamics and kinetics of chemical transformations in the natural environment via nucleophilic, redox, photolytic, and biological (microbial) reactions.
CHEM 3520. Methods in Computational Chemistry.
Modern computational tools have deepened our understanding of nearly all aspects of chemistry. This course will introduce a wide array of computational methods to solve problems ranging from atomic and molecular structure to experimental data analysis. Students will work with commercial and open-source tools such as Matlab, R, GAMESS, Gaussian, and LabView.