Spring 2014 Courses

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CHEM 1059. Chemistry of Consumer Goods.
Yi Jin Gorske.
Natural and synthetic “chemicals” make up virtually everything we purchase and consume from breakfast cereals to soaps, shampoo bottles, and over-the-counter medications. Examines the chemical components of food, drugs, soaps, plastics, and other consumer goods we encounter daily. Explores scientific resources that can be used to obtain information on product components, safety, and regulations. Also considers topics related to some of the current safety concerns raised by chemicals found in common household items through case studies and research projects. Assumes no background in science. Not open to students who have credit for a chemistry course numbered 1100 (100) or higher.
CHEM 1102A. Introductory Chemistry II.
Michael Danahy.
The second course in a two-semester introductory college chemistry sequence. Introduction to chemical bonding and intermolecular forces; characterization of chemical systems at equilibrium and spontaneous processes; the rates of chemical reactions; and special topics. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week. Students who have taken Chemistry 1109 (109) may not take Chemistry 1102 (102) for credit.
CHEM 1102B. Introductory Chemistry II.
Elizabeth Stemmler.
The second course in a two-semester introductory college chemistry sequence. Introduction to chemical bonding and intermolecular forces; characterization of chemical systems at equilibrium and spontaneous processes; the rates of chemical reactions; and special topics. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week. Students who have taken Chemistry 1109 (109) may not take Chemistry 1102 (102) for credit.
CHEM 1105. Perspectives in Environmental Science.
David Griffith and John Lichter.
Functioning of the earth system is defined by the complex and fascinating interaction of processes within and between four principal spheres: land, air, water, and life. Leverages key principles of environmental chemistry and ecology to unravel the intricate connectedness of natural phenomena and ecosystem function. Fundamental biological and chemical concepts are used to understand the science behind the environmental dilemmas facing societies as a consequence of human activities. Laboratory sessions consist of local field trips, laboratory experiments, group research, case study exercises, and discussions of current and classic scientific literature.
CHEM 1109A. General Chemistry.
Soren Eustis.
A one-semester introductory chemistry course. Introduction to models of atomic structure, chemical bonding, and intermolecular forces; characterization of chemical systems at equilibrium and spontaneous processes; the rates of chemical reactions; and special topics. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week. Students who have taken Chemistry 1102 (102) may not take Chemistry 1109 (109) for credit. To ensure proper placement, students must take the chemistry placement examination and must be recommended for placement in Chemistry 1109 (109).
CHEM 1109B. General Chemistry.
Daniel Steffenson.
A one-semester introductory chemistry course. Introduction to models of atomic structure, chemical bonding, and intermolecular forces; characterization of chemical systems at equilibrium and spontaneous processes; the rates of chemical reactions; and special topics. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week. Students who have taken Chemistry 1102 (102) may not take Chemistry 1109 (109) for credit. To ensure proper placement, students must take the chemistry placement examination and must be recommended for placement in Chemistry 1109 (109).
CHEM 2050. Environmental Chemistry.
David Griffith.
Focuses on two key processes that influence human and wildlife exposure to potentially harmful substances—chemical speciation and transformation. Equilibrium principles as applied to acid-base, complexation, precipitation, and dissolution reactions are used to explore organic and inorganic compound speciation in natural and polluted waters; quantitative approaches are emphasized. Weekly laboratory sections are concerned with the detection and quantification of organic and inorganic compounds in air, water, and soils/sediments.
CHEM 2260A. Organic Chemistry II.
Richard Broene.
Continuation of the study of the compounds of carbon. Highlights the reactions of aromatic, carbonyl-containing, and amine functional groups. Mechanistic reasoning provides a basis for understanding these reactions. Skills for designing logical synthetic approaches to complex organic molecules are developed. Chemistry 2250 (225) and 2260 (226) cover the material of the usual course in organic chemistry and form a foundation for further work in organic chemistry and biochemistry. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week.
CHEM 2260B. Organic Chemistry II.
Yi Jin Gorske.
Continuation of the study of the compounds of carbon. Highlights the reactions of aromatic, carbonyl-containing, and amine functional groups. Mechanistic reasoning provides a basis for understanding these reactions. Skills for designing logical synthetic approaches to complex organic molecules are developed. Chemistry 2250 (225) and 2260 (226) cover the material of the usual course in organic chemistry and form a foundation for further work in organic chemistry and biochemistry. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week.
CHEM 2320. Biochemistry.
Danielle Dube.
Focuses on the chemistry of living organisms. Topics include structure, conformation, and properties of the major classes of biomolecules (proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids); enzyme mechanisms, kinetics, and regulation; metabolic transformations; energetics and metabolic control. Lectures and four hours of laboratory work per week. This course satisfies a requirement for the biochemistry major.
CHEM 2400. Inorganic Chemistry.
Michael Danahy.
An introduction to the chemistry of the elements with a focus on chemical bonding, periodic properties, and coordination compounds. Topics in solid state, bioinorganic, and environmental inorganic chemistry also are included. Provides a foundation for further work in chemistry and biochemistry. Lectures and four hours of laboratory work per week.
CHEM 2520. Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy.
Soren Eustis.
Development and principles of quantum chemistry with applications to atomic structure, chemical bonding, chemical reactivity, and molecular spectroscopy. Lectures and four hours of laboratory work per week. Mathematics1800 (181) is recommended. Note: Chemistry 2510 (251) is not a prerequisite for Chemistry 2520 (252).
CHEM 3100. Instrumental Analysis.
Elizabeth Stemmler.
Theoretical and practical aspects of instrumental techniques, including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry are covered, in conjunction with advanced chromatographic methods. Applications of instrumental techniques to the analysis of biological and environmental samples are covered. Lectures and two hours of laboratory work per week.
CHEM 3310. Chemical Biology.
Danielle Dube.
The power of organic synthesis has had a tremendous impact on our understanding of biological systems. Examines case studies in which synthetically derived small molecules have been used as tools to tease out answers to questions of biological significance. Topics include synthetic strategies that have been used to make derivatives of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids) and the experimental breakthroughs these molecules have enabled (e.g., polymerase-chain reaction, DNA sequencing, microarray technology). Emphasis on current literature, experimental design, and critical review of manuscripts.