Doris Santoro

Associate Professor of Education and Chair of Education Department

Teaching this semester

EDUC 2272. Urban Education and Community

The perspective of this course views urban schools and communities as sites of promise and innovation as well as sites for social and political struggle. Examines the significance of community involvement in urban public schools, their communities and educational policy and practice. Investigates the ways urban communities supplement educational opportunities for their youth. Topics may include "grow your own" teacher initiatives, parent trigger laws, and culturally-sustaining educational programming.

EDUC 3303. Student Teaching Practicum

Required of all students who seek secondary public school certification, this final course in the student teaching sequence requires that students work full time in a local secondary school from early January to late April. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. Education 3304 must be taken concurrently. Students must complete an application and interview. Students with the following are eligible for this course: Education 2203, 3301 , and 3302; junior or senior standing; a cumulative 3.0 grade point average; a 3.0 grade point average in Education 3301 and 3302; and eight courses in a subject area that enables them to be certified by the State of Maine (English: eight courses in English; world language: eight courses in the language; life science: six courses in biology and two additional courses in biology, biochemistry, or neuroscience; mathematics: eight courses in mathematics; physical science: six courses in chemistry, earth and oceanographic science, or physics, and one course in each of the other departments listed; or social studies: six courses in history (at least two must be non-United States history) and one course each in two of the following departments: anthropology, economics, government, psychology, or sociology).

EDUC 3304. Bowdoin Teacher Scholars Seminar

Taken concurrently with Education 3303, Student Teaching Practicum. Considers theoretical and practical issues related to effective classroom instruction. Students with the following are eligible for this course: Education 2203, 3301, and 3302; junior or senior standing; a cumulative 3.0 grade point average; a 3.0 grade point average in Education 3301 and 3302; and eight courses in a subject area that enables them to be certified by the State of Maine (English: eight courses in English; world language: eight courses in the language; life science: six courses in biology and two additional courses in biology, biochemistry, or neuroscience; mathematics: eight courses in mathematics; physical science: six courses in chemistry, earth and oceanographic science, or physics, and one course in each of the other departments listed; or social studies: six courses in history (at least two must be non-United States history) and one course each in two of the following departments: anthropology, economics, government, psychology, or sociology).

Teaching next semester

EDUC 2203. Educating All Students

An examination of the economic, social, political, and pedagogical implications of universal education in American classrooms. Focuses on the right of every student, including students with physical and/or learning differences, and those who have been identified as gifted, to an equitable education. Requires a minimum of twenty-four hours of observation in a local secondary school.

EDUC 2221. Democracy’s Citadel: Education and Citizenship in America

Examines the relationship between education, citizenship, and democracy in America. Questions explored include: What does public mean and how necessary is a public to democracy? Is there something democratic about how Americans choose to govern their schools? What does citizenship mean? Is education a public good with a collective economic and civic benefit, a private good with benefits to individuals whose future earnings depend on the quality of their education, or some combination of the two? What type of curriculum is most important for civic education and how should it be taught? What policies are necessary to prevent economic inequality from undermining education’s role in fostering democratic citizenship? To what extent are the concepts of education for democracy and democratic education related?

EDUC 3301. Teaching and Learning

Teaching and Learning A study of what takes place in classrooms: the methods and purposes of teachers, the response of students, and the organizational context. Readings and discussions help inform students’ direct observations and written accounts of local classrooms. Peer teaching is an integral part of the course experience. Requires a minimum of thirty-six hours of observation in a local secondary school. Education 3302 must be taken concurrently with this course. In order to qualify for this course students must have Education 1101 and 2203; junior or senior standing; a concentration in a core secondary school subject area (English: four courses in English; foreign language: four courses in the language; life science: four courses in biology; mathematics: four courses in mathematics; physical science: three courses in chemistry, earth and oceanographic science, or physics and one course in one of the other departments listed; or social studies: three courses in history and one course in anthropology, economics, government, psychology, or sociology); and permission of the instructor.

EDUC 3302. Curriculum Development

A study of the knowledge taught in schools; its selection and the rationale by which one course of study rather than another is included; its adaptation for different disciplines and for different categories of students; its cognitive and social purposes; the organization and integration of its various components. Education 3301 must be taken concurrently with this course. In order to qualify for this course, students must have Education 1101 and 2203; junior or senior standing; and a concentration in a core secondary school subject area (English: four courses in English; foreign language: four courses in the language; life science: four courses in biology; mathematics: four courses in mathematics; physical science: three courses in chemistry, earth and oceanographic science, or physics and one course in one of the other departments listed; or social studies: three courses in history and one course in anthropology, economics, government, psychology, or sociology).

Professor Santoro is a philosopher of education who conducts empirical research. She studies the moral and ethical sources of teacher dissatisfaction and resistance. Her #teachertweets project examines the moral claims teachers make about their work on Twitter. She is a teacher educator for pre-service and experienced practitioners, and examines how norms and values are communicated in professional communities. ​

Education

  • Ed.D., Columbia University, Teachers College Program in Philosophy and Education; New York, NY, 2005
  • B.A. Major: English, University of Rochester ; Rochester, NY, 1994

Publications

Santoro, D. A. (under contract). Re-moralizing Teaching in Demoralizing Times. Harvard Education Press

Santoro, D. A. (2017). Cassandra in the Classroom: Teaching and Moral Violence. Studies in Philosophy and Education: Volume 36 Issue 1 pp 49-60. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11217-016-9544-1

Santoro, D. A. (2016). “Something funny” about Conserving Humanity and Teaching: Lessons from the Blues. Philosophy of Education 2015, E. Duarte, ed., pp. 135-138. http://ojs.ed.uiuc.edu/index.php/pes/article/view/4476/1457

Santoro, D. A. (2016). Teachers’ Expressions of Craft Conscience: Upholding the Integrity of a Profession. Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13540602.2016.1228627

Santoro, D. A. (2016). “We’re Not Going To Do That Because It’s Not Right”: Using Pedagogical Responsibility To Reframe the Doublespeak of Fidelity. Educational Theory 66, no. 1-2 (pp. 263-277).

Santoro, D. A. (2016). Protect Teacher Integrity. Dilemmas of Educational Ethics: Cases and Commentaries, M. Levinson & J. Fay, eds. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press. (pp. 137-142).

Santoro, D. A. (2016). Review of Michelle S. Moses, Living with Moral Disagreement: The Enduring Controversy about Affirmative Action. Education Review.

Santoro, D. A. (2016). Review of Claudia W. Ruitenberg, Unlocking the World: Education in an Ethic of Hospitality. Studies in Philosophy and Education. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11217-016-9533-4

Santoro, D. A. (2015). Review of Geraldine J. Clifford, Those Good Gertrudes: A Social History of Women Teachers in America. Teachers College Record. http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 17950.

Santoro, D. A. & Rocha, S. D. (2015). The Beautiful Risk of Teaching: Review of Gert Biesta, The Beautiful Risk of Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34, no. 4 (pp. 413–418).​

Santoro, D. A. (2015). Philosophizing About Teacher Dissatisfaction: A Multidisciplinary Hermeneutic Approach. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34, no. 2 (pp. 171-180).

Wilson, T. S. & Santoro, D. A. (2015). Philosophy Pursued through Empirical Research: Introduction to the Special Issue. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34, no. 2 (pp. 115-124).

Santoro, D. A. & Wilson, T. S., eds. (2015). Philosophical Enquiry through Empirical Research. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34, no. 2. 

Santoro, D. A. (2013). “I Was Becoming Increasingly Uneasy about the Profession and What Was Being Asked of Me”: Preserving Integrity in Teaching. Curriculum Inquiry, 43, no. 5 (pp. 563-587).

Santoro, D. A. & Dorn, C. (2012). “A Vital, Free, Independent and Lay Republic”: John Dewey and the Role of Education in Establishing the Turkish State. Teaching America to the World: Education and Foreign Relations since 1870, R. Garlitz & L. Jarvinen, eds., New York: Palgrave Macmillan (pp. 93-110).

Santoro, D. A. (2011). Good Teaching in Difficult Times: Demoralization in the Pursuit of Good Work. American Journal of Education 188, no. 1 (pp. 1-23).

Santoro, D. A. with Morehouse, L. (2011). Teaching’s Conscientious Objectors: Principled Leavers of High-Poverty Schools. Teachers College Record 113, no. 12 (pp. 2671-2705).

Dorn, C. & Santoro, D. A. (2011). Political Goals and Social Ideals: Dewey, Democracy, and the Emergence of the Turkish Republic. Education and Culture 27, no. 2 (pp. 3-27).

Santoro, D. A. (2011). Review of Sharon Todd, Toward an Imperfect Education: Facing humanity, Rethinking Cosmopolitanism. Studies in Philosophy and Education 30, no.3 (pp. 303-310)

Santoro, D. (2010). Teaching to Save the World: Avoiding Circles of Certainty in Social Justice Pedagogy. Philosophy of Education 2009. Urbana, IL: Philosophy of Education Society (pp. 241-249).

Santoro, D. (2009). To Form a More Perfect Union: Citizenship and the Marriage of Sophie and Emile. Philosophy of Education 2008, Ronald D. Glass, ed. Urbana, IL: Philosophy of Education Society (pp. 365-367).

Santoro Gómez, D. (2008). Women’s Proper Place and Student-Centered Pedagogy. Studies in Philosophy and Education 27, no. 5 (pp. 313-333).

Santoro Gómez, D. (2006). The Need to Develop Independent Intelligence: The Roles and Responsibilities of Teacher Educators.  Teacher Education & Practice 19, no. 4 (pp. 483-501). Special Issue: Teacher Education Today: What Would Dewey Say?

Mackler, S. & Santoro, D. (2003). Thinking what we cannot see: Performance, education, and the value of the invisible. In Scott Fletcher (Ed.), Philosophy of Education (pp. 114-121). Urbana, IL: Philosophy of Education Society. (Authorship was shared equally.)

Santoro, Doris. "Tribes: Teaching Multicultural Myths & Legends." http://www.esubjects.com. (Curriculum for mainstream and learning-disabled inclusion classrooms.)

Recent Presentations

Santoro, D. A. (under contract). Re-moralizing Teaching in Demoralizing Times. Harvard Education Press

Santoro, D. A. (2016). Cassandra in the Classroom: Teaching and Moral Violence. Studies in Philosophy and Education. http://rdcu.be/mgFH

Santoro, D. A. (2016). “Something funny” about Conserving Humanity and Teaching: Lessons from the Blues. Philosophy of Education 2015, E. Duarte, ed., pp. 135-138. http://ojs.ed.uiuc.edu/index.php/pes/article/view/4476/1457

Santoro, D. A. (2016). Teachers’ Expressions of Craft Conscience: Upholding the Integrity of a Profession. Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13540602.2016.1228627

Santoro, D. A. (2016). “We’re Not Going To Do That Because It’s Not Right”: Using Pedagogical Responsibility To Reframe the Doublespeak of Fidelity. Educational Theory 66, no. 1-2 (pp. 263-277).

Santoro, D. A. (2016). Protect Teacher Integrity. Dilemmas of Educational Ethics: Cases and Commentaries, M. Levinson & J. Fay, eds. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press. (pp. 137-142).

Santoro, D. A. (2016). Review of Michelle S. Moses, Living with Moral Disagreement: The Enduring Controversy about Affirmative Action. Education Review.

Santoro, D. A. (2016). Review of Claudia W. Ruitenberg, Unlocking the World: Education in an Ethic of Hospitality. Studies in Philosophy and Education. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11217-016-9533-4

Santoro, D. A. (2015). Review of Geraldine J. Clifford, Those Good Gertrudes: A Social History of Women Teachers in America. Teachers College Record. http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 17950.

Santoro, D. A. & Rocha, S. D. (2015). The Beautiful Risk of Teaching: Review of Gert Biesta, The Beautiful Risk of Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34, no. 4 (pp. 413–418).​

Santoro, D. A. (2015). Philosophizing About Teacher Dissatisfaction: A Multidisciplinary Hermeneutic Approach. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34, no. 2 (pp. 171-180).

Wilson, T. S. & Santoro, D. A. (2015). Philosophy Pursued through Empirical Research: Introduction to the Special Issue. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34, no. 2 (pp. 115-124).

Santoro, D. A. & Wilson, T. S., eds. (2015). Philosophical Enquiry through Empirical Research. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34, no. 2. 

Santoro, D. A. (2013). “I Was Becoming Increasingly Uneasy about the Profession and What Was Being Asked of Me”: Preserving Integrity in Teaching. Curriculum Inquiry, 43, no. 5 (pp. 563-587).

Santoro, D. A. & Dorn, C. (2012). “A Vital, Free, Independent and Lay Republic”: John Dewey and the Role of Education in Establishing the Turkish State. Teaching America to the World: Education and Foreign Relations since 1870, R. Garlitz & L. Jarvinen, eds., New York: Palgrave Macmillan (pp. 93-110).

Santoro, D. A. (2011). Good Teaching in Difficult Times: Demoralization in the Pursuit of Good Work. American Journal of Education 188, no. 1 (pp. 1-23).

Santoro, D. A. with Morehouse, L. (2011). Teaching’s Conscientious Objectors: Principled Leavers of High-Poverty Schools. Teachers College Record 113, no. 12 (pp. 2671-2705).

Dorn, C. & Santoro, D. A. (2011). Political Goals and Social Ideals: Dewey, Democracy, and the Emergence of the Turkish Republic. Education and Culture 27, no. 2 (pp. 3-27).

Santoro, D. A. (2011). Review of Sharon Todd, Toward an Imperfect Education: Facing humanity, Rethinking Cosmopolitanism. Studies in Philosophy and Education 30, no.3 (pp. 303-310)

Santoro, D. (2010). Teaching to Save the World: Avoiding Circles of Certainty in Social Justice Pedagogy. Philosophy of Education 2009. Urbana, IL: Philosophy of Education Society (pp. 241-249).

Santoro, D. (2009). To Form a More Perfect Union: Citizenship and the Marriage of Sophie and Emile. Philosophy of Education 2008, Ronald D. Glass, ed. Urbana, IL: Philosophy of Education Society (pp. 365-367).

Santoro Gómez, D. (2008). Women’s Proper Place and Student-Centered Pedagogy. Studies in Philosophy and Education 27, no. 5 (pp. 313-333).

Santoro Gómez, D. (2006). The Need to Develop Independent Intelligence: The Roles and Responsibilities of Teacher Educators.  Teacher Education & Practice 19, no. 4 (pp. 483-501). Special Issue: Teacher Education Today: What Would Dewey Say?

Mackler, S. & Santoro, D. (2003). Thinking what we cannot see: Performance, education, and the value of the invisible. In Scott Fletcher (Ed.), Philosophy of Education (pp. 114-121). Urbana, IL: Philosophy of Education Society. (Authorship was shared equally.)

Santoro, Doris. "Tribes: Teaching Multicultural Myths & Legends." http://www.esubjects.com. (Curriculum for mainstream and learning-disabled inclusion classrooms.)

Grants and Fellowships

  • 2016, 2007, 08: Fletcher Family Research Award, Bowdoin College , Brunswick, ME
  • 2016: Course Development Award, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, ME
  • 2016: Gibbons Summer Research Program, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, ME (Diego A. Guerrero ’18)
  • 2015-16: Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, ME
  • 2015: Faculty Research Award, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, ME (April & May)
  • 2014: Invited to become next editor-in-chief of Studies in Philosophy and Education (declined)
  • 2014: Invited Lecturer, Soka University, Tokyo, Japan (declined)
  • 2014: Gibbons Summer Research Program, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, ME(Roya Moussapour ’17)
  • 2014: Faculty Research Award, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, ME
  • 2011: FAME Faculty Fellowship, Maine Campus Compact, Lewiston, ME
  • 2010: Faculty Leave Fellowship, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, ME​
  • 2009: Faculty Leave Fellowship, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, ME.
  • 2007-11: Professional Service Funds to Support Activities as AERA Philosophical Studies of Education SIG Program Chair and President-Elect, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, ME.
  • 2007: Course Enrichment Funds: Education 203 and Education 245, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, ME.
  • 2003-04: William H. Kilpatrick Award in Philosophy and Education, Teachers College, NY.
  • 2002-03, 1998-09: Teachers College General Scholarship, Teachers College, NY.
  • 1999-2002: Spencer Research Training Grant, Youth Studies in New Times: Possible Selves in Multiple Worlds, Spencer Foundation, Chicago, IL.

Professional Affiliations