Seven Professors To Earn Tenure in 2007

Story posted February 16, 2007

Seven faculty members have been promoted to the rank of associate professor with tenure, effective July 1, 2007. The Board of Trustees voted on their promotion during their Feb. 8-10, 2007, meeting on campus.

Those faculty members are: Pamela M. Fletcher, assistant professor of art history; Guillermo Herrera, assistant professor of economics; John Lichter, assistant professor of biology and environmental studies; Stephen M. Majercik, assistant professor of computer science; Samuel P. Putnam, assistant professor of psychology; Jennifer Taback, assistant professor of mathematics; and Birgit Tautz, assistant professor of German.

Fletcher
Fletcher

Pamela M. Fletcher is a highly original scholar whose fields of inquiry range from Victorian to contemporary art. Her recent research centers on the art market in Victorian England. Currently, she is adapting GIS-based technology to help map the origins and evolution of the commercial art gallery in London. Fletcher has presented and published on a wide variety of topics, and is the author of the book "Narrating Modernity: The British Problem Picture, 1895-1914" (Ashgate 2003). She earned her A.B. from Bowdoin, and a M.A. and Ph.D in art history from Columbia University. A highly engaging teacher, Fletcher has taught on a wide range of subjects, with a particular emphasis on questions of modernism and gender. She has been on the Bowdoin faculty since 2001. Read about some of her research.

Herrera
Herrera

Guillermo "Ta" Herrera's studies span the areas of natural resource and environmental economics, with an emphasis on renewable natural resources. His recent research examines policies and methods for improving the way multi-species fisheries are managed, based, in part, on the spatial component of fish populations. Previously a senior research fellow at the Marine Policy Center of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, he was appointed adjunct scientist there for a four-year term beginning April 2006. He has published widely, including the journals Marine Resource Economics and American Journal of Agricultural Economics (forthcoming). Herrera earned his A.B. in Biology at Harvard, and a M.A. economics, M.S. Quantitative Ecology and Resource Management, and a Ph.D., economics, from the University of Washington. He is a highly multidisciplinary professor who has taught at Bowdoin since 2000. Read about some of his research.

Lichter
Lichter

John Lichter is an ecosystem ecologist whose wide-ranging fields of inquiry and inclusive research has made him a leading force in many of Bowdoin's environmental studies initiatives. He has mentored over 40 Bowdoin students in biological/ecological research, and frequently includes students in his own research and publications. Lichter's research has included the mechanisms of plant succession, and the effects of rising atmospheric CO2 on forest productivity. Since joining the faculty in 2000, he has been a leading researcher in a long-term, multidisciplinary study of the ecology and environmental history of Merrymeeting Bay. Lichter has published widely in scientific journals, including a 2000 paper in Nature, named one of the most influential papers in environmental science by Essential Science Indicators. Lichter earned his Ph.D. in ecology from the University of Minnesota. Read about some of his research.

Majercik
Majercik

Stephen M. Majercik is an expert in artificial intelligence, whose research areas are among the most challenging in computer science today: stochastic satisfiability and planning, reasoning and learning in uncertain environments. He has presented and published widely, with papers appearing in journals including Artificial Intelligence Journal and Journal of Automated Reasoning. Majercik is a deeply committed academic mentor, guiding honors projects, student summer-research fellowships, and involvement in Bowdoin's cutting-edge robotics laboratory. He earned an A.B. in government from Harvard; a M.B.A. in finance and M.F.A. in theater administration from Yale; a masters in computer science from the University of Southern Maine; and a Ph.D. in computer science from Duke University. He joined the Bowdoin faculty in 2000. Read about some of his research.

Putnam
Putnam

Samuel P. Putnam is a widely recognized expert in the field of child development. He recently completed a pioneering 100-child study of toddler personality development. The research was conducted at the Bowdoin College Toddler Temperament Laboratory, which he established after joining the faculty in 2001. Widely published in professional journals, including Child Development and Developmental Psychology, Putnam's research also has been featured in the national media, including Time magazine. He frequently includes students in his research and has supervised over 30 independent study and honors projects. Putnam earned his B.S. in psychology from University of Iowa, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Human Development & Family Studies at Pennsylvania State University. Read about some of his research.

Taback
Taback.

Jennifer Taback is an expert in geometric group theory and topology. She has received multiple grants from the National Science Foundation in support of her research, and has included several Bowdoin students in her work. She is widely published in journals including Journal of Algebra, Geometriae Dedicata and the Transactions of the American Mathematical Society, and has presented at mathematics conferences and seminars internationally. Taback earned her B.A in mathematics at Yale University, and her M.A. and Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Chicago. She joined the Bowdoin faculty in 2002. Read about a recent talk she gave.

Tautz
Tautz

Birgit Tautz brings wide-reaching intellectual inquiry to both her research and teaching. An expert on 18th century German culture and romanticism, her recent research also includes explorations of race, ethnic and cultural differences as reflected in literature and film. Tautz has published in both the leading U.S. and German professional journals and she is author of the book, "Reading and Seeing Ethnic Differences in the Enlightenment: From China to Africa," (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007). Tautz earned her Diplom Germanistik from the University of Leipzig, M.A. in German from the University of Wisconsin, and Ph.D. in German from the University of Minnesota. She joined the Bowdoin faculty in 2002. Read about some of her research.

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