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Featured Events

Joachim Homann, Gallery Conversation: "Night Vision"

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October 13, 201512:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

What attracted American artists to the dark? Curator Joachim Homann discusses nocturnal paintings as catalysts for modernist experiments, focusing on works on view by Georgia O'Keeffe, Marsden Hartley, Joseph Cornell, and Louise Nevelson.This is the first major museum survey dedicated to scenes of the night in American art from 1860 to 1960 - an era not yet illuminated by electricity to the beginning of the Space Age.

 Night Vision: Nocturnes in American Art, 1860-1960 brings together ninety works in a range of media - including paintings, prints, drawings, and photographs -created by such leading American artists as Ansel Adams, Winslow Homer, Edward Hopper, Lee Krasner, Georgia O'Keeffe, Albert Ryder, John Sloan, Alfred Stieglitz, and Andrew Wyeth, among others.

Free and open to the public.

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Allen Hockley: "Woodblock Illustrated Histories of Meiji-era Japan"

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October 14, 20154:30 PM – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

The threat westernization posed to indigenous cultural practices during the middle decades of the Meiji era (1868-1912) sparked a resurgence of traditional values that rippled through government policies, social institutions, and cultural production. Historians have invested considerable effort to understand the causes, manifestations, and legacies of these developments. Art historians have been attentive to popular artists' engagement with social and cultural developments of the Meiji era. But apart from Sino- and Russo-Japanese war imagery, the role of popular visual culture in the formation and dissemination of Meiji-era nativist and nationalist discourses has not yet received serious consideration. This lecture addresses these lapses by focusing on a large and varied corpus of woodblock prints and illustrated books that engage nationalist ideologies by attempting to visualize key moments in Japan's 2500-year history.

Allen Hockley, associate professor of Art History and Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at Dartmouth College, is a specialist in Japanese art. He received his B.A. from the University of Victoria, M.A. from the University of British Columbia, and his Ph.D. from the University of Toronto.

This lecture is sponsored by The Bylthe Bickel Edwards Fund, Art History and Asian Studies Departments and The Bowdoin College Museum of Art.

Image: Adachi Gink: Empress Regent Jing Subjugates Korea, from Illustrated Historical Synopsis of Japan, 1888

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Members' Preview Evening: 'Earth Matters: Land as Material and Metaphor in the Arts in Africa'

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October 14, 20155:00 PM – 6:30 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Museum members and their guests are invited to a reception and preview tour of the exhibition Earth Matters: Land as Material and Metaphor in the Arts in Africa, which opens on Thursday, October 15, 2015.

RSVPs are requested but not required. You may RSVP here or send a message to

photo:  Sahel, (detail) 2001, by Iba Ndiaye. Private collection.

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Robert Morrison: "An Economy of Knowledge in the 16th Century Mediterranean"

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October 15, 20157:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

The Bowdoin Medieval and Early Modern Studies Colloquium Science Before Science lecture series presents Professor of Religion Robert Morrison.

Morrison came to Bowdoin College in August, 2008. His courses lie within the academic study of both Islam and Judaism, but also address comparative topics. His research has focused on the role of science in Islamic and Jewish texts, as well as in the history of Islamic science. He has contributed the chapters on Islamic astronomy to the New Cambridge History of Islam and the Cambridge History of Science.

Morrison received his A.M. and A.B. from Harvard University and his M.Phil. and Ph.D. from Columbia University. He was previously a faculty member at Whitman College (in Walla Walla, WA) from 2001 to 2008.

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Sonja Klocke: "Welcome to the 'German Wonderland'?: German Unification and the Effects 25 Years Later"

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October 15, 20157:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Sills Hall, Room 117

As part of the German Embassy initiative 25 Years German Unity, Sonja Klocke will discuss the East German experience of unification with a particular focus on gender. This talk will be the first of several events organized by the German Department this academic year featuring contemporary German voices in Europe.

Klocke is assistant professor of German at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She researches twentieth to twenty-first century culture: the legacy of East Germany, women's writing, transnational literature, and gender theory.

This event is free and open to the public.

For more information, contact Jill S. Smith (

Sponsored by The German Embassy Initiative 25 Years German Unityand the Department of German.

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Student A Cappella Showcase

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October 15, 20158:00 PM – 9:30 PM
Memorial Hall, Pickard Theater

As part of Inaugural celebrations, Bowdoin a cappella groups will perform to kick off events. Join us for a night of song featuring:

Ursus Verses

For more information, go to

For those who cannot attend in-person, the concert will be streamed live at

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Inaugural Symposium: "The Power of the Liberal Arts"

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October 16, 20152:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Memorial Hall, Pickard Theater

KEYNOTE: Hanna Holborn Gray, Harry Pratt Judson Distinguished Service Professor Emerita of History and president emerita, University of Chicago

Panel 1: Yes, It Still Matters: Why and How We Teach the Liberal Arts 

Moderated by Jennifer Scanlon, William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of the Humanities in Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies and interim dean for academic affairs, Bowdoin.
William Adams, chairman, National Endowment for the Humanities, and president emeritus, Colby College; Camille Charles, Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Term Professor in the Social Sciences; University of Pennsylvania; Adam Weinberg '87, president of Denison University;
Mary Lou Zeeman, R. Wells Johnson Professor of Mathematics, Bowdoin

Panel 2: (begins at approximately 3:45) Making a Living and Making a Life: The Liberal Arts in Commerce and Citizenship

Moderated by Andy Serwer '81, journalist and editor-in-chief of Yahoo Finance.
Kenneth I. Chenault '73, H'83, CEO and chairman, American Express;
Ruthie Davis '84, president and designer of Ruthie Davis;
Shelley Hearne '83, visiting professor, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; George J. Mitchell '54, H'96, former US Senate Majority Leader

For those who cannot attend, the symposium will be streamed live at

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Inaugural Concert: GUSTER!

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October 16, 20158:30 PM – 10:00 PM
Morrell Gym, Gymnasium

For admission: Students must present a Bowdoin ID at the door. Tickets are required for all others and are limited to the Bowdoin community, including family members of faculty and staff. Tickets can be picked up at the Office of Events and Summer Programs starting Monday, October 5. Alumni can pick up tickets starting Thursday afternoon, October 15, in the Homecoming and Inauguration Welcome Center in Moulton Union. Space is limited. Doors open at 8:00 p.m.

Guster's songs remain packed with hummable choruses and dense lyrical detail amid the muscular guitar riffs, clanging percussion, and deceptively dark lyrics. It is a renewed band with a bolstered purpose, a band on their own vector. The new album Evermotion introduces you to a Guster that is free, not calculated, seasoned but loose, confident in re-shaping their legacy. Since forming at Tufts in 1992, Guster has become one of the leading indie/alternative bands, releasing seven critically acclaimed albums in twenty years, starting with Parachute in 1995. Evermotion (to be released on their own Ocho Mule label through Nettwerk Records) is the follow-up to 2010's Easy Wonderful, which earned the band its highest-ever chart debut on the Billboard 200 at #22, while reaching #2 on both the SoundScan Alternative and iTunes charts.

For more information on the band go to

For more information on all inaugural weekend festivities visit:

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Inauguration: Installation Ceremony for Clayton S. Rose, Fifteenth President of Bowdoin College

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October 17, 201510:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Farley Field House, Infield

Clayton S. Rose was elected Bowdoin's fifteenth president by unanimous vote of the Bowdoin College Board of Trustees in January 2015, following an eight-month international search. Presidential inaugurations are rare--this is only the fifteenth in the College's 221-year history. In addition to the installation ceremony itself and luncheon, the weekend includes a variety of events celebrating this milestone. All members of the Bowdoin community are invited. For more information on the inaugural festivities, go to 
*Installation ceremony and luncheon registration required.
(Please plan to arrive by 10:15 a.m.)
For those who cannot attend in-person, the event will be streamed live at

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Leah Wright Rigueur: "Between Ben Carson and Barack Obama: Black Politics in 2016"

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October 19, 20156:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Leah Wright Rigueur's first book, The Loneliness of the Black Republican: Pragmatic Politics and the Pursuit of Power (Princeton University Press, 2015) covers more than four decades of American political and social history, and examines the ideas and actions of black Republican activists, officials and politicians, from the era of the New Deal to Ronald Reagan's presidential ascent in 1980. Her work ultimately provides a new understanding of the interaction between African Americans and the Republican Party, and the seemingly incongruous intersection of civil rights and American conservatism. Her book takes a long approach to American history and not only tells an important story about race and the Republican Party, but also expands our understanding of the evolution in opinions and behaviors of everyday African Americans that supported or rejected the GOP on a local, state, and national level, between 1936 and present day. 

Wright Rigueur is an assistant professor of public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. An historian by training, she received her B.A. in history from Dartmouth College and her M.A. and Ph.D. in history from Princeton University. Before joining the Kennedy School faculty, she was a professor at Wesleyan University in Connecticut. 

Her research interests include twentieth-century United States political and social history, and modern African American history. Her work emphasizes race, civil rights, political ideology, the American two-party system, and the presidency. At the Kennedy School, she teaches courses on race, riot, and backlash in the U.S., and the Civil Rights Movement, race, and policy in modern America.

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David Hecht, Book Release and Discussion: "Storytelling and Science: Rewriting Oppenheimer in the Nuclear Age"

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October 20, 20154:30 PM – 6:30 PM
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

No single figure embodies Cold War science more than the renowned physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer. Although other scientists may have been more influential in establishing the institutions and policies of the nuclear age, none has loomed larger in the popular imagination than the "father of the atomic bomb." Americans have been drawn to the story of the Manhattan Project he helped lead and riveted by the McCarthy-era politics that caught him in its crosshairs. Journalists and politicians, writers and artists have told Oppenheimer's story in many different ways since he first gained notoriety in 1945. 

In Storytelling and Science: Rewriting Oppenheimer in the Nuclear Age (May 2015 by University of Massachusetts Press), David K. Hecht examines why they did so, and what they hoped to achieve through their stories.

Moderated by Matthew Klingle, associate professor of history and environmental studies. 

Hecht is assistant professor of history, is a historian of science, focusing on the modern United States. His particular interest is in public images of science, and he has published on the phenomenon of "scientific celebrities." Hecht received his BA in history from Brandeis University and his PhD in the history of science from Yale University. Other scholarly interests include the history of energy, as well as the role that popular rhetoric about science plays in reinforcing (and sometimes challenging) the status quo. In 2011 he was awarded the Sydney B. Karofsky prize, Bowdoin's annual teaching prize for junior faculty.

For more information, contact Rebecca Banks at

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Maria Ruvoldt: "Michelangelo in Mid-Life"

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October 21, 20154:30 PM – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Maria Ruvoldt, associate professor of art history at Fordham University and well-known scholar of the art of Michelangelo, is the author of The Italian Renaissance Imagery of Inspiration: Metaphors of Sex, Sleep, and Dreams (2004). As a 2014-2015 Fellow at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, she has conducted research on Michelangelo's highly-finished gift drawings and subsequent copies in other media. 

Sponsored by the Bowdoin College Lectures and Concerts General Fund, Departments of Art History, Romance Languages and Literatures, and Mediterranean Studies. 

Photo: cover from Maria Ruvoldt's book, The Italian Renaissance Imagery of Inspiration: Metaphors of Sex, Sleep, and Dreams, Cambridge University Press, 2004.

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Michael Rozyne '78: "Sustainable Food - Healthy, Green, Fair, Affordable: Can We Have It All and Scale It Up?"

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October 21, 20157:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Michael Rozyne, Bowdoin class of 1978, will share his story and experience growing two social venture food businesses - Equal Exchange and Red Tomato.

He will describe the current local and sustainable food movement in the U.S., the issues, challenges, and obstacles that must be overcome to scale up this movement, and how innovation, technology, and collaboration might come into play.

Michael is executive director of Red Tomato, a non-profit business connecting farmers to consumers, relying on wholesale distribution to deliver farm products to local grocery stores. Previously Rozyne co-founded Equal Exchange, a cooperative business that trades food in a way that empowers both farmers and consumers.

Note: This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin's Live Webcasts page. After the event, the talk will posted on


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Michael Mansour: "It's What's on the Inside That Counts: Intracellular Control of Fungal Pathogens by Macrophages"

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October 22, 20154:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

The fungal cell wall is composed of nearly pure carbohydrate recognized by a number of carbohydrate-recognition receptors on phagocytes such as macrophages, neutrophils and dendritic cells. Michael Mansour?s lab investigates the influence of fungal cell wall carbohydrates to the development of host immune responses with a two-fold focus:

First is the role of fungal carbohydrate recognition to the phagosomal protein repertoire and adaptive immunity. Following recognition, fungal pathogens are phagocytosed into newly formed organelles called phagosomes. The lab found that surface receptor recognition of fungal carbohydrates determines the recruited phagosome protein repertoire in macrophages including antigen-presentation machinery. In addition, researchers are exploring the role of fungal carbohydrates to other immune cell responses including neutrophils. 

Second is the prediction of fungal infection. Mansour and his team are investigating human responses to fungal carbohydrates as a prognostic indicator for IFI. The ability to "risk stratify" patients into low or high susceptibility for fungal infection will allow personalized clinical management, therefore limiting the use of unnecessary diagnostics and anti-fungal drug side-effects. 

Michael Mansour, M.D. - Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital

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Frederick Davis: "Banned: A History of Pesticides and the Science of Toxicology"

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October 22, 20157:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

Frederick Rowe Davis is an environmental historian and historian of science at Florida State University. His most recent book, Banned: A History of Pesticides and the Science of Toxicology, was published last year by Yale University Press.

Sponsored by the Lectures & Concerts Committee, and the Departments of History, Government, Environmental Studies, and Chemistry.

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Cecily Hilsdale: "Revisiting the Mediterranean: Medieval Art through the Thalassic Optic"

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October 22, 20157:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Study of the Mediterranean has recently assumed a central position within the discipline of history, where the emphasis on the liquid continent and corrupting sea has been described as "the new thalassology." In this talk, Professor Hilsdale will explore the implications of the emergence and recent turn to the Mediterranean as an analytic frame from the art historical point of view, and will consider if and how the Mediterranean can serve as an explanatory model, heuristic tool, or even a critical term for the diverse visual cultures - European, Islamic, and Byzantine - of the medieval Mediterranean.

Dr. Hilsdale is Associate Professor of Art History and Communications Studies at McGill University.

This event is free and open to the public.

Sponsors: The Mellon Initiative in Mediterranean Studies, and the departments of Classics, Art History, Romance Languages and Literatures, and History

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Studies in Beauty Initiative: "Beauty and Ethics Symposium"

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October 23, 20152:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Cram Alumni House, Barn (Torrey Barn)

This faculty seminar follows the Studies in Beauty Initiative course cluster: The Ethics of Image; Aesthetics in Africa and Europe; Gender, Sexuality and Race in Classical Music; and Into the Wild: Untamed Nature in German-Speaking Culture. Intended to foster further discussions on the topic of beauty among Bowdoin faculty and beyond, two panel discussions with prominent scholars of diverse disciplines will explore the interactions between aesthetics and ethics in various contexts, cultures and eras.

Panelists include: 
Jean-Godefroy Bidima, Yvonne Arnoult Chair in Francophone Studies, Tulane University 
Dana E. Byrd, assistant professor of art history, Bowdoin College 
Sarah Conly, associate professor of philosophy, Bowdoin College  
Alexandre Dauge-Roth, associate professor of French and 
Francophone studies, Bates College 
Lydia Moland, associate professor of philosophy, Colby College  
Lawrence Simon, associate professor of philosophy and environmental studies, Bowdoin College

Open to the public and free of charge. Reception to follow.

For more information go to

Sponsored by the Andrew Mellon Foundation, The Departments of Romance Languages and Literatures, Sociology and Anthropology, and the Africana Studies, Latin American Studies and Cinema Studies Programs.

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Theater Performance: Crimes of the Heart, by Beth Henley October 22, 23, 24

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October 23, 20157:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Memorial Hall, Pickard Theater

  • Oct 22-24, 2015
  • Time: 7:30 pm
  • Location: Pickard Theater, Memorial Hall
  • Tickets: $3 general public; $1 with Bowdoin ID
A tragic comedy explores the tensions between the three Magrath sisters, Meg, Babe, and Lenny, who reunite at Old Granddaddy's home in Hazlehurst, Mississippi. Babe has just shot her abusive husband. The three sisters were raised in a dysfunctional family with a penchant for ugly predicaments.Earlier resentments come steaming back to life, as the sisters are forced to deal with past relationships and events, while coping with Babe's current crisis. Each must face the consequences of her own crimes of the heart.

Masque and Gown's presentation, directed by Axis Fuksman-Kumpa '17, brings Beth Henley's masterpiece to the Bowdoin audience.

Smith Union Information Desk (207-725-3375) beginning Oct 1, and immediately before the show at the Memorial Hall box office. Tickets are $3 for the general public, and $1 with a Bowdoin ID.

Performance is sponsored  by the Student Activities Fund and donors to the Masque and Gown Fund.

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Studies in Beauty Initiative - Film Screening: 'In the Eye of the Spiral'

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October 28, 20157:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

The poignant and magnificent documentary In the Eye of the Spiral explores Haitian arts and the Haitian people's highly developed productivity and creativity. Recipient of the 2014 Big Apple Film Festival (BAFF) Award for Best Feature Documentary, the film is narrated by British singer and activist, Annie Lennox, and supported by Brian Eno, who has licensed his music for the soundtrack. It was co-directed by Raynald Leconte and Eve Blouin.

In their capacity to render an irreducible and authentic vision of the inner and human Self, the arts in the Caribbean have always been a means of predilection to transcend tragedies, be the latter historical or climatic. A country enduring numerous plights, Haiti is the true embodiment of this philosophical disposition. In the Eye of the Spiral pays tribute to the imposing Haitian ingenuity beautifully and introducing the world to Spiralism, one of the contemporary intellectual, literary and artistic currents for the island. 

Spiralism appeared in the sixties, led by Franktienne, a monumental Haitian writer, painter, and UNESCO Artist for Peace who was short-listed for the 2009 Nobel Prize in Literature. It is partly inspired by the theory of chaos and Engel's concept of the spiral and expresses a powerful sense of aesthetics and ethics that, through a complex and infinitely moving process, produces unpredictable, confounding, and staggering non-linear, multidimensional, multilayered, regenerative and dense arts.

Haitian-born director Raynald Leconte has lived in Senegal, Morocco, and Gambia. A serial entrepreneur, Leconte has over twenty years of experience in media and technology. His most recent project, the Haitian Cultural Foundation HCF, has attracted considerable interest since its inception in January 2010 and has served as a venue for presenting Haitian artists to the international art community. His next project, In the Eye of the Spiral 2, will showcase the culture and art of Cuba. 

Born in Africa, Eve Blouin is co-director and writer on the film. She is also a broadcaster, documentary producer, art collector, property developer and designer, and musician. She produced the movies and documentaries When Fish Fly in 1992, Whitepaddy in 1996, as well as Kid Creole and my Coconuts, a 2009 documentary featuring the story of the famous 80s-90s band of the same name. 

This event is free and open to the public, and is part of the "Studies in Beauty" activity on campus during the month of October.

Sponsored by the Andrew Mellon Foundation (Dean's Office), the Departments of Romance Languages and Literatures and Sociology and Antropology, and the Latin American Studies, Africana Studies and Cinema Studies Programs.

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Ken I. Kersch: "Who's Afraid of the Living Constitution? Mid-Century Liberalism's Rejoinder to the Modern American Right"

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November 2, 20157:30 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Since the 1980s "Reagan Revolution," the call for the restoration of "The Founders' Constitution" - originalism - has played a major role in rallying the modern American Right. Recently, however, conservatives have re-fashioned an originalist outlook formerly emphasizing judicial restraint to accommodate an activist agenda in cases involving gun rights, religious liberty, free speech protections for campaign expenditures, and the (would-be) invalidation of the Affordable Care Act. The traditional liberal rejoinder to originalism, "living constitutionalism," however, was fashioned to answer the old originalism, not this new, currently more vital, version.

Ken I. Kersch, Tallman Scholar in Government, will argue that liberals seeking a more powerful and persuasive constitutional philosophy to counter the new conservatism should re-group by re-visiting the largely forgotten political visions of seminal Cold War liberals like John Dewey and Reinhold Niebuhr. Doing so offers today's liberals the most promising way forward in forging a revitalized living constitutionalism to to answer the modern conservative challenge.

Free and open to the public.

Sponsored by the Tallman Lecture Fund.

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Jacob Dlamini, The Alfed E. Golz Memorial Lecture: "Collaboration in Apartheid South Africa"

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November 3, 20157:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

The struggle against apartheid was understood often as a morality tale, with blacks on one side and whites on the other.  The truth, however, was far messier.  

Jacob Dlamini, winner of the prestigious Alan Paton award for notable works of South African non-fiction and assistant professor of history at Princeton University, explores the role of collaboration in apartheid and specifically examines the role of black collaborators, raising questions about how we might historicize and understand other conflicts from around the world.

Sponsored by the Alfred E. Golz Memorial Lecture.
FMI please contact the Department of History at

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Visiting Writers Series: A Reading by Richard Russo

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November 4, 20157:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Richard Russo will read from a selection of his works.

Russo's first novel, Mohawk, was published in 1986 while he was teaching at Southern Illinois University Carbondale. His 2001 novel, Empire Falls received the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. In addition, Russo has published six other novels and a short story collection. He has also written a number of screenplays, including co-writing the 1998 film Twilight with director Robert Benton, the teleplay for the HBO adaptation of Empire Falls, the screenplay for the 2005 film Ice Harvest, and the screenplay for the 2005 Niall Johnson film Keeping Mum.

Russo has a BA, an MFA, and PhD from the University of Arizona, and has taught at Colby College in Maine.

Sponsored by the English Department Visiting Writers Series.
This is a non-ticketed event, free and open to the public.

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Carrie Wu: "The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Spread of the Invasive Reed Phragmites Australis in Virginia's Chesapeake Bay Watershed"

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November 5, 20154:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Carrie investigates the mechanisms of adaptive differentiation and speciation. She is interested in how plants respond to their local environments, and the role those adaptations play in diversification at the genomic, population, and species levels. While evidence for local adaptation in plants is abundant, much less is known about the particular traits and genes that confer this specialization to specific environments.

Her research uses the wildflower genera Ipomopsis and Mimulus to examine how environmental variation influences phenotypic and genetic variation among natural plant populations. She combines observations of natural populations and experimental manipulations in the field and greenhouse with tools from quantitative genetics and physiological ecology.
Her research projects take her to field sites in the northern Cascades in Washington, down through the Southern California foothills, and eastward to the Colorado Rockies. Together, these studies provide insight into how environmental stresses, adaptation to these conditions, and evolutionary change are intertwined, using tractable, ecologically relevant systems.

Carrie Wu is an Assistant Professor of Biology, in the Department of Biology, at the University of Richmond, VA. 

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Namiko Kunimoto: "Nakamura Hiroshi and the Politics of Embodiment"

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November 11, 20154:30 PM – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Dr. Namiko Kunimoto, assistant professor of art history at the Ohio State University will deliver a public lecture on the modern Japanese artist Nakamura Hiroshi (b. 1932).  A significant artist active in the 1950s, Nakamura was part of the "reportage" movement and created works that critiqued the US military presence in Japan. Dr. Kunimoto will be discussing these paintings as well as Nakamura Hiroshi's later turn to Surrealism within the context of postwar Japanese politics. 

Sponsored by the Departments of Art History and Asian Studies.

Image: Taken from "Sunagawa No. 5" by Hiroshi Nakamura, 1955, Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo.

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Screening with Filmmaker Shawn Batey: 'The Changing Face of Harlem'

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November 11, 20157:30 PM – 10:30 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Cleaveland 151

Though recognized internationally as "the Black Mecca," the historic neighborhood of Harlem was overlooked for decades. Recently, Harlem has matured into a prosperous locale for commercial and corporate interests, and with an influx of new investment has come a younger, more professional, and affluent class of residents.

The Changing Face of Harlem examines the revitalization of Harlem as told through the deeply personal stories of its residents, small business owners, politicians, developers, and clergy. Shot over a period of ten years, the film takes a critical look at Harlem's history, early development, its present transformation, and the current concerns for cultural preservation.  

Shawn Batey is an award-winning producer, filmmaker, and writer of documentary films and videos. Her films include Hair-Tage, a cultural documentary on dreadlocks, Through My Eyes, an interpretation of September 11th from the perspective of Latino and African-American Youth, 60+, a musical documentary of an all-female senior citizen band, Making the World Feel Better-The P.S. 230 Mural Project, and Tree Fever, a quirky look at Christmas tree sellers in Upper Manhattan.

Batey was chosen to participate in the 2006 Working Films Residency at Mass Moca, elected as a Mellon Learning Associate at Bates College where she directed a workshop in film development and pre-production, and is the 2007 recipient of Roy Dean New York City Film Grant.

Sponsored by the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund, the Cinema Studies Program, the Africana Studies Program, and the Department of Romance Languages.

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Ari S. Friedlander: "Seeing Below the Surface: Using New Technology to Study the Underwater Behavior of Whales"

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November 12, 20154:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Ecologist Ari Friedlaender will discuss understanding the relationship between the foraging behavior of marine mammals and their prey. Working on a wide range of marine mammal species including baleen and toothed whales and dolphins across a range of geographic regions, Friedlaender has long-term ecological research projects ongoing in Alaska, California, Massachusetts, North Carolina, and Antarctica. He has helped in the development of tag technology and analytical and visualization tools to better understand the underwater movements and behaviors of marine mammals. For his dissertation research, he used geospatial tools to quantify how the distribution of cetaceans related to environmental variables in Antarctica. 

Friedlaender is associate professor at the Marine Mammal Institute at Oregon State University. At the MMI his research lab is focused on developing new telemetry applications to elucidate the underwater behavior of marine mammals. In Antarctica, he is part of the Long-Term Ecological Research program at Palmer Station to better understand the ecological roles of cetaceans in a rapidly changing environment. In Alaska and Massachusetts, his research focuses on variability in the foraging strategies of humpback whales in relation to changes in their prey. In California, he is part of the SoCal Behavioral Response Study to understand the impacts of anthropogenic sound on a variety of cetacean species. 

Along with this research, Friedlaender is an active member of the Society for Marine Mammalogy, acting as an associate editor for Marine Mammal Science and serving on the Conservation Committee. He is also a principal investigator in the Southern Ocean Research Partnership to conduct non-lethal research on cetaceans in the Southern Ocean.

Friedlaender received his B.S. in biology from Bates College, his M.Sc. in marine biology from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, and his Ph.D. in Ecology from Duke University. He was the National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Duke from 2006 to 2008.

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Andrew Bacevich, Santagata Lecture: "Washington Rules"

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November 16, 20157:30 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Andrew Bacevich is professor of international relations and history at Boston University; he previously taught at Johns Hopkins University and at West Point, where he graduated in 1969. Time magazine calls him "one of the most provocative - as in thought-provoking - national security writers out there today." Bacevich's bestseller, Washington Rules, is a critique of the country's military industrial complex.

Andrew Bacevich also holds a Ph.D. in American diplomatic history from Princeton. With the US Army, he served during the Vietnam War, and has held posts in Germany and the Persian Gulf; he retired, as a Colonel, in the early 1990s. Bacevich's books include The New American Militarism: How Americans Are Seduced by War, and American Empire: The Realities and Consequences of U. S. Diplomacy. Bacevich has also written for The Atlantic, Foreign Affairs, and The New York Times, and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Sponsored by the Kenneth V. Santagata Memorial Fund.

Free and open to the public.

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Concert: Pianist Jeremy Denk and Violinist Stefan Jackiw Perform the Ives Violin Sonatas

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November 18, 20157:30 PM – 9:00 PM
Studzinski Recital Hall, Kanbar Auditorium

Jeremy Denk is one of America's most foremost pianists, an artist the New York Times hails as someone "you want to hear no matter what he performs". Winner of the 2013 MacArthur 'Genius' Fellowship, the 2014 Avery Fisher Prize, and Musical America's 2014 Instrumentalist of the Year award, he has recently appeared as soloist with the Cleveland Orchestra, New York Philharmonic, Los Angeles Philharmonic, and the symphony orchestras of Boston, Chicago, San Francisco, and London.
Violinist Stefan Jackiw is recognized as one of his generation's most significant artists, captivating audiences with playing that combines poetry and purity with an impeccable technique. Hailed for playing what the Boston Globe called "uncommon musical substance" that is "striking for its intelligence and sensitivity," Jackiw has appeared as soloist with the Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, New York, Philadelphia, and San Francisco symphony orchestras, among others. His solo performance of Mendelssohn's Violin Concerto with the YouTube Symphony Orchestra at Australia's Sydney Opera House in March was seen live on YouTube by more than 30 million people worldwide.

The two will join together for an extraordinary evening of music to perform the Ives Sonatas, composed by Charles Ives. 

This event is FREE. Tickets are required.

Sponsored by the Office of Events and Summer Programs.
Underwritten by the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund.

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