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Examination of a Whale

While one group of Coastal Studies students was deploying research gear from an 88-foot schooner, others were having their own unusual field trip experience in the far reaches of the Gulf of Maine: necropsying a humpback whale.

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Featured Events

Joe Goodkin: "Folk-Opera of the Odyssey"

Joe Goodkin: "Folk-Opera of the Odyssey"

October 23, 20144:30 PM – 6:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

Joe Goodkin will perform his original 30-minute Odyssey, written for solo acoustic guitar and voice. The piece is comprised of 24 short songs performed as an uninterrupted cycle.

Joe is a professional musician from Chicago and the lead song writer and singer for Paper Arrows. He was a classics major at the University of Wisconsin.

His performance of his acoustic Odyssey and accompanying talk are wonderful; the style of the music and performance are also very engaging and contemporary. For more information visit joesodyssey.com.

Open to the public and free. Sponsored by the Jasper Jacob Stahl Lectureship Fund and the Classics Department.

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Helena Goscilo, "Seeing Red: Soviet Women in Graphic Form"

Helena Goscilo, "Seeing Red: Soviet Women in Graphic Form"

October 23, 20147:00 PM – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Helena Goscilo is Professor of Slavic and East European Languages and Cultures at The Ohio State University. Her areas of expertise include Russian culture, esp. 20th and 21st century; visual culture, especially art, graphics, and film; film adaptation; gender; Russian folklore; the Russian novel; Bakhtin; Romanticism; representations of war; and Russian capitals (Petersburg and Moscow).

Lecture topic: The Soviet poster, which addressed the broad masses, was a genre ideally suited to the state's imperative of molding Soviet identity and everyday values while propagating the political ideology that fueled them. Goscilo examines the genre's convergence with official dicta in its assignment of gender roles, focusing primarily on the Soviet era. She takes into account the relationship between women's functions and achievements as urged or claimed by posters, on the one hand, and their everyday reality, on the other.

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The Alfred E Golz Memorial Lecture: "Democracy at the Roots: Understanding Haiti's Political Culture" - Streamed LIVE

The Alfred E Golz Memorial Lecture: "Democracy at the Roots: Understanding Haiti's Political Culture" - Streamed LIVE

October 23, 20147:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Laurent Dubois is the Marcello Lotti Professor of Romance Studies and History at Duke University. He is the author of several books on the history and culture of the French Caribbean and Atlantic World, including Avengers of the New World: The Story of the Haitian Revolution (2004), A Colony of Citizens: Revolution and Slave Emancipation in the French Caribbean, 1787-1804 (2004), and his latest work, Haiti: The Aftershocks of History (2012). He also has an interest in the relationship between sports and politics. In 2010 he published Soccer Empire: The World Cup and the Future of France. He is currently preparing a book manuscript on the history of the banjo, for which he has received several awards, including a Mellon New Directions Fellowship, and fellowships from the National Humanities Center and the Guggenheim Foundation. Professor Dubois also served as head historical consultant for a PBS documentary on the Haitian Revolution, which premiered in 2009.

Professor Dubois's upcoming Golz lecture, "Democracy at the Roots: Understanding Haiti's Political Culture," explores three intertwined legacies of the Haitian Revolution on political thought and practice in the country: the largely hostile reaction to it outside the country, the formation of new political institutions and structures, and -- most importantly -- the creation of a new set of cultural, social, and economic structures that Jean Casimir has called the “counter-plantation” system. He identifies both the main currents and critical counter-currents within each of these legacies, calling attention to the aspects of the latter legacies that seem to him to be the most valuable and worth comprehending and nourishing in constructing new Haitian futures.

This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin's Live Webcasts page.

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Exploring with Drosophila: Lessons Learned on a Journey through the Fly Genome

Exploring with Drosophila:  Lessons Learned on a Journey through the Fly Genome

October 24, 201412:30 PM – 3:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

2014 President's Science Symposium. Key note speaker. Sarah Elgin, Department of Biology, Washington University, St. Louis

The years since 1953 have been an exciting time, as genetics has embraced first molecular biology and then genomics approaches. In this talk I will reflect on my own journey, and the broader lessons learned from a career studying chromatin structure and epigenetic mechanisms. During this time the puzzle posed by our very large eukaryotic genomes has been resolved by the recognition that our genomes are largely made up of transposable elements (TEs) and their remnants, bits of DNA derived from invading viruses and the like. Thus packaging up the DNA, which is done by generating a protein-DNA complex called chromatin, is necessary not only to fit all of the DNA into the nucleus, but also to maintain most of the genome in a silent state.

Our work in flies identified one of the key proteins used in silencing, Heterochromatin Protein 1 (HP1), which is conserved from yeast to humans. Chromatin-based regulatory mechanisms now referred to as "epigenetics" are dependent on the underlying DNA organization, including the distribution of those TEs. Our good ideas that have helped to resolve this puzzle have always come from putting together inputs from multiple sources. Good communication, both among scientists and with the larger community, is essential for our continuing efforts to understand how life works.

Kresge Audiorium 12:30 p.m. followed by Student Presentations.  The Student Summer Poster Presentations: 3:00 - 5:00 Morrell Gymnasium.

This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin's Live Webcasts page.

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Prof. Sherry Roush, "Haunting Authors, Haunting Us: Writing What the Dead Speak"

Prof. Sherry Roush, "Haunting Authors, Haunting Us: Writing What the Dead Speak"

October 27, 20147:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Sherry Roush is associate professor of Italian at Penn State University.  She is author of Hermes' Lyre: Italian Poetic Self-Commentary from Dante to Tommaso Campanella (2002), co-editor of The Medieval Marriage Scene: Prudence, Passion and Policy (2005) and editor and translator of Campanella's Selected Philosophical Poems (2011). Her talk presents parts from her current book project investigating the rhetorical power harnessed by Renaissance authors who feign "speaking" with the spirits of the dead in ghost stories, dream visions, and journeys to the afterlife.  The book is forthcoming from the University of Toronto Press under the title Speaking Spirits: Ventriloquizing the Dead in Renaissance Italy.

This event, free and open to the public, is sponsored by the Departments of Romance Languages and English and by the Lectures and Concerts General Fund.

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Gallery Conversations: "Anatomy of a Renaissance Painting"

Gallery Conversations: "Anatomy of a Renaissance Painting"

October 28, 201412:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Nina Roth-Wells, '91, an independent painting conservator, and Andrea Rosen, Curatorial Assistant at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, discuss the creation and restoration of the 15th century Italian tempera on panel paintings in the Museum's installation of Renaissance art, Lovers and Saints: Art of the Italian Renaissance.

Free and open to the public.

Illustration: The Crucifixion (detail), ca. 1370 by Barnaba Modena.

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Sujata Moorti: "Mothers, Inc.: The Racial Politics of Transnational Surrogacy"

Sujata Moorti: "Mothers, Inc.: The Racial Politics of Transnational Surrogacy"

October 28, 20144:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

Mothers, Inc.: The Racial Politics of Transnational Surrogacy

Sujata Moorti is Professor of Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies at Middlebury College. She has published extensively on media representations of gender, sexuality and diasporic formations. She is currently completing a manuscript on iFeminism where she teases out the ways in which social media are altering understandings of feminism around the world. In this manuscript she explores the transnational circuits of activism and knowledge production that social media technologies engender, altering our conceptions of gender and agency. She is completing two other monographs on gendered violence. She is the author of Color of Rape: Gender, Race and Democratic Public Spheres (SUNY Press, 2002) and has co-edited Global Bollywood: The Travels of Hindi Song and Dance (University of Minnesota Press, 2008) and Local Violence, Global Media: Feminist Analyses of Gendered Representations (Peter Lang, 2009). She teaches courses on feminist cultural studies, diasporic media studies, and postcolonial theory.

Prof. Moorti will examine the visual culture that has emerged around the transnational surrogacy industry located in India. Moving beyond the ethical and moral dilemmas posed by the phenomenon this presentation centers on the rich and dense media culture that has emerged around this phenomenon: reproscape. An analysis of these images helps us understand how the different women involved in the surrogacy industry (e.g., surrogates, agents, egg donors, prospective parents and doctors) are each differently located in discourses of citizenship and equally implicated in transnational labor circuits. Informed by critical race theories and postcolonial feminist scholarship the presentation unpacks the racial politics of this industry.

Sponsored by: Sociology and Anthropology, Asian Studies, Gender and Women's Studies, and the Lectures and Concerts General Fund.

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Threatened and Endangered: Flora and Fauna of Maine: Artist's Books by Rebecca Goodale - Streamed LIVE

Threatened and Endangered: Flora and Fauna of Maine: Artist's Books by Rebecca Goodale - Streamed LIVE

October 28, 20147:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Book artist Rebecca Goodale will present an illustrated talk about her multi-year project to create artist's books documenting all of the plants and animals on Maine's "Threatened and Endangered Species" lists.
The talk is presented in conjunction with an exhibition of Goodale's work, on display in Hawthorne-Longfellow Library, and a related library exhibition, "Envisioning Extinctions," curated by Prof. Susan Wegner (Art History). A reception in the library will follow the talk.

This lecture is sponsored by the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund, the Association of Bowdoin Friends, and the Bowdoin College Library.

Note: This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin's Live Webcasts page.

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Arielle Saiber: "Dante's Fire-Breathing Rainbow"

Arielle Saiber: "Dante's Fire-Breathing Rainbow"

October 29, 20147:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

This lecture examines Dante's description of the three giri ("rounds") of the Trinity in Paradiso in order to envision what the Pilgrim "saw" when looking at this great Mystery. Arielle Saiber, associate professor of Romance Languages, will consider possible theological, aesthetic, geometric, and nature-based configurations of three "rings" that may have inspired the Poet.
Free and open to the public.

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"The Gods of Times Square," with Cinematographer Richard Sandler

"The Gods of Times Square," with Cinematographer Richard Sandler

November 3, 20146:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Cleaveland 151

Cinematographer Richard Sandler shot "The Gods of Times Square" over the course of six years during a radical transformation of the iconic New York City neighborhood. 

Gentrification and the real estate boom squeezed out the mom-and-pop stores, and gone, too, were the colorful characters who made Times Square a "speaker's corner." Only the most strident of religious zealots remained to warn of "eternal sin."

Sandler's film records a time in New York's history when the place most identified with free speech and the soul of New York changed from a democratic, interracial common ground to a corporate-controlled, soulless theme park.

Please join us for a screening of  Sandler's "The Gods of Times Square," followed by a discussion with the cinematographer.

Generously supported by Lectures and Concerts and the Cinema Studies Program. 

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Santagata Lecture: An Evening with Writer Karen Russell - Streamed LIVE

Santagata Lecture: An Evening with Writer Karen Russell - Streamed LIVE

November 3, 20147:30 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Karen Russell's debut novel, Swamplandia!, was chosen by The New York Times as one of the "Ten Best Books of 2011" and was long-listed for The Orange Prize.

Russell has been featured in The New Yorker's "20 Under 40" list, and was chosen as one of Granta magazine's Best Young American Novelists. In 2009, she received the "5 Under 35" award from the National Book Foundation.

In 2013 she was named a recipient of a MacArthur Foundation "Genius Grant," the youngest of the year's 24 winners.

Note: This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin's Live Webcasts page.

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Film & Conversation: Peter Greenaway's "Goltzius and the Pelican Company"

Film & Conversation: Peter Greenaway's "Goltzius and the Pelican Company"

November 4, 20147:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

In Peter Greenaway's imaginative portrait of the mannerist print maker, Hendrick Goltzius appears as an artist who stages his seductive Old Testament images to finance work with new printing technologies. The screening will be followed by a conversation with English professors Aviva Briefel and Aaron Kitch, and curator, Joachim Homann.  Presented in conjunction with the exhibition, Hendrick Goltzius: Mythology and Truth.

RSVPs are kindly requested, but not required.  You may RSVP here: https://goltziuspelicancompany.eventbrite.com
or email Christine Piontek at artmuseumevents@bowdoin.edu.

Free and open to the public.

Photo:  Film Still from Goltzius and the Pelican Company.

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"The War on Terror. . .An Update" with Col. David Hunt

"The War on Terror. . .An Update" with Col. David Hunt

November 4, 20147:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

David Hunt, FOX News War and Terrorism Expert, will deliver a public talk, The War onTerror...An Update, which is free of charge and open to the public. For more information contact the Events Office at 725-3433 or by e-mail to events@bowdoin.edu.

Col. David Hunt (U.S. Army, ret.) is the president and founder of DAR, an international security company, and a regular on Fox News, where he provides expert analysis on war and terrorism. His leadership role in the military began with a Special Operations Operational Detachment of twelve soldiers, expanding to the command of a brigade of over 1,000. He served as tactical advisor in Bosnia, where he facilitated national intelligence matters and coordinated a $350 million program for the NSA and CIA.

A security advisor in eight Olympic games, Hunt has six years of combat experience. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, the Silver Star, and four Purple Hearts. He is a New York Times best-selling author, a radio talk show host, and the highest-rated contributor on cable TV for the past fourteen years. Bill O'Reilly of Fox News calls Hunt "the best military analyst in the business."

Hunt earned his undergraduate degree in philosophy and his masters degree in English at Norwich University. In 1991, he attended the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard.

This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin's Live Webcasts page.

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25 Years Since the Fall of the Berlin Wall: Pop-up Exhibit

25 Years Since the Fall of the Berlin Wall: Pop-up Exhibit

November 4, 20147:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Blue Room

What do you know about the Berlin Wall? Where were you when the Wall fell? Come and share in an exhibit of memorabilia, research, art, and conversation with students, faculty members, and members of the community. Light refreshments will be available.
Free and open to the public.
Sponsored by German Information Center and German Department.

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The Warburg Institute Presents 'British Art in the Mediterranean' (1941): Michael Berkowitz Lecture

The Warburg Institute Presents 'British Art in the Mediterranean' (1941): Michael Berkowitz Lecture

November 5, 20147:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

The Warburg Institute presents British Art in the Mediterranean (1941) with Michael Berkowitz on Wednesday, November 5th at 7:00 pm in the Beam Classroom of the Visual Arts Center at Bowdoin College.

The Warburg relocated from Hamburg to London in 1933. Professor Berkowitza's current research focuses on the practice of photography at the Warburg Institute, and their efforts to bring "Western Civilization" to a broad popular audience--through photographic exhibitions. His talk will focus on German Jewish refugees and how they approached western civilization in a totally different way from the Nazis.

Professor Berkowitz received his PhD in European cultural history under George L. Mosse (University of Wisconsin). He is Professor of modern Jewish history in the Department of Hebrew & Jewish Studies, University College London. He has two forthcoming works - Jews and Photography in Britain: Connections and Developments, 1850-2007 and The Jewish Engagement with Photography, co-edited with Martin Deppner.

Sponsored by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Departments of History, German, and Art History, and the Mellon Humanities Intitiative- Studies in the Mediterranean.

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Robert Ives: "Bowdoin Has a Chapel, but Does Bowdoin Have Religion?"

Robert Ives: "Bowdoin Has a Chapel, but Does Bowdoin Have Religion?"

November 6, 201412:30 PM – 1:30 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Robert E. Ives, Bowdoin's director of religious and spiritual life, presents "Bowdoin Has a Chapel, but Does Bowdoin Have Religion?" as part of the ongoing Community Lecture Series. A popular figure on campus, Ives served three coastal Maine churches after divinity school and also worked as a lobsterman and boat builder. For thirty-three years he was the director of the Carpenter's Boat Shop in Pemaquid, Maine, an apprenticeship school committed to building boats and serving others. 

Community Lectures take place 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the Main Lounge of Moulton Union and include time for questions from the audience. Arrive at noon with a bag lunch. Beverages and cookies provided. The lectures are free and open to the public. Questions? Call 207-725-3253.

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Ben Ewen-Campen: "Stem Cell Genes in Germ Cells and in Brains"

Ben Ewen-Campen: "Stem Cell Genes in Germ Cells and in Brains"

November 6, 20144:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Ben Ewen-Campen, Postdoctoral Candidate, Extavour Lab, Harvard University

Research in the Extavour lab is aimed at understanding the causes and consequences of evolutionary change in developmental processes. We are especially interested in those genes and developmental processes that direct cell fate specification in early embryogenesis. Our experimental work is primarily focused on the evolution and development of germ cells and reproductive systems in animals. Multicellularity evolved many times in eukaryotes, and in each instance, when cells of the multicellular aggregate first begin to adopt distinct fates, the first division of labor to arise is one that separates a reproductive lineage (the germ line) from a sterile lineage (the soma). A dedicated germ line is thus a profound novelty and critical feature of multicellular life. In sexually reproducing organisms, only the germ cells can contribute their genome to the next generation. Consequently, germ line specification and gonad function can have significant impacts on reproductive success and fitness.

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Lecture: "The Art and Life of Marcel Duchamp: A Collision of the Personal and Professional"

Lecture: "The Art and Life of Marcel Duchamp: A Collision of the Personal and Professional"

November 6, 20144:30 PM – 5:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Francis Naumann will address Marcel Duchamp's ties to the many artists in his family, including his brothers Jacques Villon and Raymond Villon-Duchamp, his sister Suzanne Duchamp, and her husband, Jean Crotti. Naumanna's numerous publications include, most recently, The Duchamp Family of Artists (2014).

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition, Collaborations and Collusions: Artistsa Networks from the Nineteenth Century to the Present.

RSVPs are kindly requested, but not required. You may RSVP here: http://artandlifeofduchamp.eventbrite.com or contact Christine Piontek at artmuseumevents@bowdoin.edu.

Free and open to the public.

Photo: Francis Naumann

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Reception at the Museum of Art with Francis Naumann

Reception at the Museum of Art with Francis Naumann

November 6, 20145:30 PM – 6:30 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Enjoy refreshments, conversation, and a chance to see the work of Marcel Duchamp and family after the lecture by Francis Naumann.

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Collaboration and Collusions: Artists' Networks from the Nineteenth Century to the Present.

Illustration:  Marcel Duchamp and Katherine Dreier (detail), 1936.

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Brodie Family Lecture: "Race, Income, and the Reduction of Inequality in American Education."

Brodie Family Lecture: "Race, Income, and the Reduction of Inequality in American Education."

November 6, 20147:00 PM – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Sean Reardon delivers this year's Brodie Family Lecture address entitled, "Race, Income, and the Reduction of Inequality in American Education."

Dr. Reardon is the endowed Professor of Poverty and Inequality in Education and is Professor (by courtesy) of Sociology at Stanford University.  He is the recipient of a William T. Grant Foundation Scholar Award, a Carnegie Scholar Award, and a National Academy of Education Postdoctoral Fellowship.

This event is free, and open to the public.

This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin’s Live Webcasts page.

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Christopher Bolton Lecture "Oshii Mamoru's Avalon: Gaming, Graphics, History, and the Future of Japanese Film"

Christopher Bolton Lecture "Oshii Mamoru's Avalon:  Gaming, Graphics, History, and the Future of Japanese Film"

November 10, 20144:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Oshii Mamoru is one of anime's most recognizable directors worldwide. Avalon (2001) is an anime-inspired live-action movie about a grim future in which people escape their grey lives by playing an immersive virtual reality war game. Filmed in Poland with a Polish cast and military hardware borrowed from the Polish army, Avalon combines this setting and a range of subtle visual effects to revisit the history of Japan and the West during the Cold War.

Dr. Christopher Bolton, Associate Professor of Comparative and Japanese Literature at Williams College, is a specialist on Japanese science fiction and animation; he is also the associate editor of the journal Mechademia.

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"Double Consciousness: Remembering Black Images in American Struggles for Freedom"

"Double Consciousness: Remembering Black Images in American Struggles for Freedom"

November 11, 20144:30 PM – 5:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Art historian Bridget R. Cooks will revisit the seminal Bowdoin exhibition, The Portrayal of the Negro in American Painting in the context of American struggles for racial equality through the visual arts. Her book Exhibiting Blackness: African Americans and the American Art Museum was awarded the inaugural James A. Porter & David C. Driskell Book Award in African American Art History (2013).

RSVPs are kindly requested, but not required. You may RSVP here: http://cooksdoubleconsciousness.eventbrite.com
or contact Christine Piontek at artmuseumevents@bowdoin.edu.

Free and open to the public.

This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin’s Live Webcasts page

Photo: Bridget Cooks

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From Hamdan to Hobby Lobby: Nine Years of the Roberts Court

From Hamdan to Hobby Lobby: Nine Years of the Roberts Court

November 12, 20147:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Zach Heiden is the Legal Director of the ACLU of Maine. Zach received his A.B. from Bowdoin College in 1995, where he majored in English. He has litigated cases to defend the civil rights and civil liberties of artists, immigrants, journalists, pregnant women, prisoners, protesters, religious minorities, students, and whistleblowers. Zach has been recognized as "rising star" in New England Super Lawyer magazine, which called him "a hero to beer drinkers everywhere" for his challenge to censorship of alcoholic beverage label illustrations.

In addition to litigation, Zach frequently testifies before committees of the Maine Legislature. In 2008, he served as a member of the Maine Judicial Branch Indigent Legal Services Commission, which helped restructure the delivery of constitutionally-mandated legal representation to indigent individuals. Zach has also served on the Judicial Branch Taskforce on Electronic Court Records Access and the Judicial Branch Advisory Committee on Fees. In 2012, Zach served on the Executive Committee of Mainers United for Marriage, the statewide campaign to win marriage equality. Zach has served as an adjunct professor at the University of Maine School of Law, where he taught constitutional law.

Zach joined the ACLU of Maine in February 2004 as the organization's first staff attorney, and he was promoted to Legal Director in March 2007. Prior to that, he was an associate in the litigation department of Testa, Hurwitz & Thibeault in Boston, where he worked on white-collar defense and securities litigation. Zach received his M.A. in Modern Irish and British Literature from the University of Florida (1998). He earned his J.D. from Boston College Law School (2002), and he was awarded the Law School Alumni Association Award at graduation. During law school, Zach served as managing editor of the BCLS International and Comparative Law Review, and he founded BC Law's first chapter of the American Constitution Society. Following law school, Zach clerked for the Honorable Susan Calkins on the Maine Supreme Judicial Court. He is the author of Fences and Neighbors, 17 Law and Literature 225 (2005) and Too Low a Price: Waiver and the Right to Counsel, 62 Maine L. Rev. 488 (2010).

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New regulatory functions for ancient RNA-modifying enzymes

New regulatory functions for ancient RNA-modifying enzymes

November 13, 20144:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Wendy Gilbert, Professor of Biology, MIT


The proteins of a cell are the primary determinants of cellular form and function. Regulation of the proteome is therefore the ultimate goal of signaling pathways that connect cell physiology to internal and external environmental cues. We study the molecular mechanisms and physiological functions of translational control of gene expression using genome-wide translation state profiling, molecular genetics, and biochemistry.

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Genevieve LeMoine: "Finding Crocker Land: Archaeology at Etah and Beyond"

Genevieve LeMoine: "Finding Crocker Land: Archaeology at Etah and Beyond"

November 13, 20147:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

To mark the opening of the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum exhibit, A Glimmer on the Polar Sea: The Crocker Land Expedition, 1913-1917, curator Genevieve LeMoine will discuss her archaeological research at Etah, northwest Greenland. Etah was occupied by Inuit for 1000 years before it became the headquarters of Donald MacMillan's Crocker Land Expedition. Finds ranging from prehistoric ivory harpoon heads to twentieth-century cereal boxes help tell the story of the diverse groups who lived there and influenced one another.


Reception to follow in Hubbard Hall.

Free and open to the public.  Call 725-3416 for information. 

Talk underwritten by the Russell and Janet Doubleday Endowment.  Reception funded by Post Grape-Nuts.

Photo: Aerial view of Etah, Greenland, June 26, 2006. Photograph by John Darwent.


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Gallery Conversations: "Revealing Mediterranean Women"

Gallery Conversations: "Revealing Mediterranean Women"

November 18, 201412:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Susan Wegner, Associate Professor of Art History, and Davida Gavioli, Senior Lecturer in Italian, lead an interdisciplinary conversation about select works in the exhibition, Revealing Mediterranean Women.

Free and open to the public.

Illustration: Medee, Theatre de la Renaissance, Sarah Bernhardt, (detail) 1898, lithograph by Alphonse Mucha.

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Bowdoin College Museum of Art Members' Reception: "Hendrick Goltzius: Mythology and Truth"

Bowdoin College Museum of Art Members' Reception: "Hendrick Goltzius: Mythology and Truth"

November 20, 20146:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Museum members are invited to join in conversation and good cheer at a reception preceding the Thursday Night Salon on the exhibition Hendrick Goltzius: Mythology and Truth.

RSVPs are kindly requested but not required. You may RSVP here: https://goltziusmemberreception.eventbrite.com
or contact Christine Piontek at artmuseumevents@bowdoin.edu.

Free and open to the public.

Illustration: Adoration of the Shepherds (detail), ca. 1598-1600 by Hendrick Goltzius.  Bowdoin College Museum of Art.

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Thursday Night Salon: "Hendrick Goltzius: Virtuoso Printmaker, Exquisite Painter"

Thursday Night Salon: "Hendrick Goltzius: Virtuoso Printmaker, Exquisite Painter"

November 20, 20147:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

George Keyes, former chief curator at the Detroit Institute of Arts, Kurt Sundstrom, Curator at the Currier Museum of Art, Joachim Homann, Curator of the Bowdoin College Museum of Art present a close-up examination and discussion of the delightful prints and an astonishing painting by Hendrick Goltzius. Presented in conjunction with Hendrick Goltzius: Mythology and Truth.

Illustration:  Henry IV, King of France (detail), 1600, engraving by Hendrick Goltzius.  Bowdoin College Museum of Art.

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