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Sabbatical Seminars: Zeeman on Tipping Points and Environmental Resilience

Mathematics professor Mary Lou Zeeman kicked off this year's faculty seminar series with a talk titled "Harnessing Math to Understand Tipping Points and Resilience," stressing the importance of bringing together the studies of math and the environment.

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Student Life
Finance Alumni Share Career Insights With Students

Bowdoin Career Planning recently invited three Bowdoin alumni and entrepreneurs to campus to speak to students about their careers in finance.

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Featured Events

Stem Cell Tumors: Getting Their Fix on the Fly

Stem Cell Tumors: Getting Their Fix on the Fly

September 18, 20144:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 016

Michelle Markstein, Assistant Professor, Biology Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Research Interests: Stem cells and cancer

The Markstein lab seeks to understand the stem cell properties of cancer cells with the goal of developing new cancer therapeutics. We focus on cell-cell interactions within the stem cell microenvironment and on the plasticity of stem cell genome architecture. Our approach is in vivo, using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to screen for anti-cancer drugs and drug targets.

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Author Pope Brock: "Another Fine Mess: Life on Tomorrow's Moon"

Author Pope Brock:  "Another Fine Mess: Life on Tomorrow's Moon"

September 18, 20144:30 PM – 5:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Pope Brock will speak on his current book project, Another Fine Mess: Life on Tomorrow's Moon, which imagines what might happen on the moon in the mid-to-late 21st century if the schemes various governments, corporations, and obsessed individuals have for it all come true.

Brock is also the author of Charlatan: America's Most Dangerous Huckster, the Man Who Pursued Him, and the Age of Flimflam (Crown, 2008), an account of the improbable career of John Brinkley, the most successful quack in U.S. history, and Indiana Gothic (Doubleday/Nan Talese). His work has appeared in GQ, Rolling Stone, Esquire, Talk, The New Yorker, London Independent, Life, People, and the London Sunday Times Magazine.

Brock received his BA from Harvard University and his MFA from New York University School of the Arts.  He is currently on the faculty of the MFA Program in Writing at the University of Nebraska.

Brock's lecture will be followed by a reception in the Visual Arts Center "Fishbowl."

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Lecture: "'A Chance to Be Aware': On Richard Tuttle's Art"

Lecture: "'A Chance to Be Aware': On Richard Tuttle's Art"

September 18, 20144:30 PM – 5:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Richard Shiff, who has written about Richard Tuttle's work and interviewed the artist publicly, addresses the philosophical and perceptual aspects of "awareness" in Tuttle's art. Shiff's publications include Cezanne and the End of Impressionism (1984), Barnett Newman: A Catalogue Raisonn (co-authored, 2004), Doubt (2008), Between Sense and de Kooning (2011), and Ellsworth Kelly: New York Drawings 1954-1962 (2014). Presented in conjunction with Richard Tuttle: A Print Retrospective.


RSVPs are kindly requested but not required. You may RSVP here: http://achancetobeaware.eventbrite.com
or contact Christine Piontek at artmuseumevents@bowdoin.edu.

Free and open to the public.

Photo: Richard Shiff

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Common Good Day

Common Good Day

September 20, 201411:30 AM – 4:00 PM
Farley Field House, Infield

Common Good Day is a campus-wide day of service. More than 500 students, faculty, staff, alumni, and Friends of Bowdoin volunteer with about 60 different service agencies and take on projects such as gardening, trail maintenance, visiting the elderly, painting, yard work, grant research, and spending time with children. This year's Common Good Day will offer plenty of opportunities to have fun and get involved, with events including a catered lunch, service projects, and a free t-shirt for all participants!

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Capitalism v. Democracy: Money in Politics and the Free Market Constitution

Capitalism v. Democracy: Money in Politics and the Free Market Constitution

September 22, 20147:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Timothy K. Kuhner is an associate professor of law at Georgia State University. He graduated magna cum laude from Bowdoin College in 1998, where he was awarded highest honors in sociology and the Romance Languages Prize.

He will discuss his new book, Capitalism v. Democracy. As of the latest national elections, it costs approximately $1 billion to become president, $10 million to become a Senator, and $1 million to become a Member of the House. High-priced campaigns, an elite class of donors and spenders, superPACs, and increasing corporate political power have become the new normal in American politics. In Capitalism v. Democracy, Timothy Kuhner explains how these conditions have corrupted American democracy, turning it into a system of rule that favors the wealthy and marginalizes ordinary citizens. Kuhner maintains that these conditions have corrupted capitalism as well, routing economic competition through political channels and allowing politically powerful companies to evade market forces. The Supreme Court has brought about both forms of corruption by striking down campaign finance reforms that limited the role of money in politics. Exposing the extreme economic worldview that pollutes constitutional interpretation, Kuhner shows how the Court became the architect of American plutocracy.

Kuhner teaches courses on international law, comparative law, human rights, campaign finance and alternative dispute resolution. In 2014, Kuhner received two awards for his scholarship: the Patricia T. Morgan Award and the Provost's Faculty Fellowship Award. He received his J.D. and LL.M., magna cum laude, from Duke University School of Law in 2004. He graduated in the top 10 percent of his class and was elected to the Order of the Coif. 


More information about his book can be found here: http://www.sup.org/book.cgi?id=21815

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Gallery Conversations: "Printing with Richard Tuttle: Process and Collaboration"

Gallery Conversations: "Printing with Richard Tuttle: Process and Collaboration"

September 23, 20144:30 PM – 5:30 PM
Museum of Art, Bernard & Barbro Osher Gallery

Greg Burnet is a frequent collaborator with Richard Tuttle.  Presenting rarely seen studio sketches, printing plates, and color proofs, he gives a full account of the making of some of Richard Tuttle's most acclaimed prints.  Presented in conjunction with Richard Tuttle: A Print Retrospective.

Free and open to the public.

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Developing a broader perspective for marine communities in an area of climate change: insights from the Galapagos Islands

Developing a broader perspective for marine communities in an area of climate change: insights from the Galapagos Islands

September 25, 20144:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Jon D. Witman, Professor, Biology Department, Brown University

Research Interest:
My research is directed toward understanding the dynamics of populations and communities living in marine hard substrate habitats. Our lab is conducting research focused around three themes: 1) physical forcing of marine benthic ecosystems, 2) studies on the origin vs. the maintenance of pattern, and 3) marine biodiversity. How community structuring processes vary with scale is a consideration that pervades all aspects of our research.

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Maine to Greenland: Exploring the Maritime Far Northeast

Maine to Greenland: Exploring the Maritime Far Northeast

September 25, 20147:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Smithsonian Institution Arcticarchaeologist William Fitzhugh and Maine-based photographer Wilfred Richardwill speak Thursday, September 25 at 7:00 pm in Kresge Auditorium, on theBowdoin College campus. Their illustrated lecture coincides with the release oftheir new book, Maine to Greenland: Exploring the Maritime Far Northeast,published by the Smithsonian Institution Press. Following the lecture therewill be a reception at the Arctic Museum, where they will sign copies of theirbook. Also visitors will have a chance to view an exhibit of some of Richard’sphotographs. The lecture and reception are free and open to the public.

William Fitzhugh has spent overthree decades studying cultures of northern Canada, Alaska, Siberia, Mongolia,and Scandinavia. His work as an archaeologist and anthropologist has focused onthe cultural and environmental history of Labrador and southern Quebec, theevolution of maritime cultures, contact between native populations andEuropeans, and the origins of reindeer herding. He is the head of the ArcticStudies Center at the Smithsonian Institution.

Wilfred Richard is ageographer, photographer, Registered Maine Guide, and research fellow at theUmmannaq Polar Institute in Greenland. He has traveled extensively throughoutNew England, the Arctic, and Subarctic, photographing landscapes and seascapes,terrestrial and marine floral and fauna, and the everyday activities of local residentsand visiting scientists. He has exhibited his photographs widely.

Using fascinating personalstories and stunning photographs, Fitzhugh and Richard will introduce the audience to people and placesthroughout the northern North Atlantic and explain both the importance andallure of this region. Their appearance is sponsored by the Peary-MacMillanArctic Museum and Arctic Studies Center, Bowdoin College.

The Arctic Museum is open Tuesday-Saturday 10:00 amto 5:00 pm, and from 2:00 pm to 5:00 pm Sundays. Admission to the museum isfree. The Museum is closed Mondays and on national holidays. For moreinformation please call the Arctic Museum at 207-725-3416

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Careers in the Locavore Economy

Careers in the Locavore Economy

September 25, 20147:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

There is more to the locavore movement than farmer's markets on the green! Maine is an incubator of entrepreneurial opportunities connected to the food economy, and Bowdoin alumni are playing an active role in its success. Come learn about their work, challenges and areas of growth. Panelists include representatives from the fishing industry, craft beer movement, international tea import start-up, and the role that foundations are playing in supporting local food initiatives. Refreshments will follow.

This will be a moderated discussion with plenty of time for questions and informal conversation over refreshments.The panelists are:

Jay Espy, '79 executive director of the Elmina B. Sewall Foundation. Based in Brunswick, the foundation focuses on the environment, animal welfare, and human well-being, primarily in Maine.

Before joining the Sewall Foundation, Espy served as president of Maine Coast Heritage Trust, a statewide land conservation organization. During his tenure, the Trust accelerated its land protection efforts along Maine's entire coast by conserving more than 125,000 acres and establishing the Maine Land Trust Network, which helps build capacity of local land trusts throughout Maine. Jay has an A.B. in Economics from Bowdoin and master's degrees in business and environmental studies from Yale's School of Management and its School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.

Sara Holby, '08 founder Anjiri Tea, Kenya

After graduating from Bowdoin College in May 2008, Sara Holby headed to Kisii, in western Kenya, to volunteer for a health-related non-governmental organization (NGO). When funding ran short for the NGO Sara worked with local women (and her sister and Mom), to found Anjiri tea, a non-profit that directly benefits local women, farmers and aids orphans. Anjiri Tea also supports Anjiri Foundation which together form a sustainable trade cycle to educate orphans in Western Kenya. Sarah was an ES/History major, who went to Kenya after graduation with a Global Citizen Grant from Bowdoin's McKeen Center. In her senior year, Sara was a co-president of the Outing Club.

Sean Sullivan, '08, executive director, Maine Brewers' Guild, and Co-founder, Buoy Local

The Maine Brewers' Guild is a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting and protecting the craft beer industry in Maine. The guild's mission is to keep Maine in the forefront of the craft beer revolution by offering high quality and creative diversity for the customer. Buoy Local is a community-minded technology company based in Portland, ME with a mission to help consumers spend locally and grow greater Portland's economy. The company offers a single, community-based, 'open loop' gift card that enables consumers to buy locally from their favorite independent stores and businesses in the Portland region. Sean was an Art History major at Bowdoin.

Lucy Van Hook, '06 Fisheries Program Coordinator, Maine Coast Fishermen's Association


Lucy Van Hook is the Fisrheries Program Coordinator at the Maine Coast Fishermen's Association and provides support to the groundfish sector as the Sector Data Analyst. She works on projects that focus on sustaining the inshore groundfish fishermen of Maine. Projects include building a greater constituency and increasing fishermen engagement, fishing gear and monitoring research, business planning for fishermen and expanding communication and outreach efforts to build a strong foundation for the organization.

Though Lucy's fishing experience is limited to trolling for mackeral, she grew up spending time in Penobscot Bay and has spent the last ten years living in Mid-coast Maine. She graduated from Bowdoin College with a focus in biology and environmental studies and spent several years conducting field-based research in a fresh water ecosystem. Most recently, she earned her masters degree in climate science policy with a strong emphasis on interdisciplinary, sustainable approaches to building policy.

Photo: Sara Holby, '08 Anjiri Tea Company

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Fall 2014 Marvin Bileck Printmaking Project Visiting Artist: Lisa Bulawsky

Fall 2014 Marvin Bileck Printmaking Project Visiting Artist: Lisa Bulawsky

September 29, 20144:15 PM – 6:30 PM
Edwards Arts Center, Room 115 [Digital Media Lab]

Director of Island Press and printmaking professor from Washington University in St. Louis, Lisa Bulawsky will be visiting Bowdoin the week of September 28 and will be working with students in Professor Carrie Scanga's printmaking courses. She will give a public lecture on her work, examples of which can be viewed at lisabulawsky.com. 


This event is sponsored by the Marvin Bileck Printmaking Project and the Bowdoin College Visual Arts Department and is free and open to the public.

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Laura McClure: "Women and Theater in Classical Athens"

Laura McClure: "Women and Theater in Classical Athens"

October 1, 20147:30 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Laura McClure is Jane Ellen Harrison Professor of Classics at the University of Wisconsin.  Professor McClure received her Ph.D. in Classical Languages and Literatures from the University of Chicago in 1991. Her research interests include Athenian drama, the study of women in the ancient world, and classical reception. Her books focus on representations of women in Athenian drama: Spoken Like a Woman: Speech and Gender in Athenian Drama (Princeton, 1999) and Courtesans at Table: Gender and Greek Literary Culture in Athenaeus (Routledge 2003). She has edited three volumes on the subject of women in antiquity, including Making Silence Speak: Women's Voices in Greek Literature and Society, with Andre Lardinois (Princeton, 2001), Prostitutes and Courtesans in the Ancient World, with C. A. Faraone (Wisconsin, 2006), and Sexuality and Gender in the Classical World (Blackwell, 2008). She has published numerous articles, most recently an analysis of the role of women in tragic recognition scenes. She is currently completing a textbook about women in ancient Greece and Rome (under contract with Blackwell). While on research leave in 2014-15, she plans to work on a new project on women and memory in Greek tragedy. She regularly teaches advanced Greek language courses, Women and Gender in the Classical World, Civilization of Ancient Greece, and Ancient Drama in translation.


Sponsored by the Mellon Humanities Initiative--Studies in the Mediterranean, the Jasper Jacob Stahl Lectureship Fund, and the Department of Classics.

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The Mima Mound Mystery- Solved?

The Mima Mound Mystery- Solved?

October 2, 20144:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 016

Professor Emmanuel "Manny" Gabet, a geomorphologist at San Jose State University in California, says prehistoric generations of pocket gophers created the vast fields of Mima mounds found in south Puget Sound, Eastern Washington and in other locations around the world. Local geologists and wildlife researchers aren't so sure.

Gabet's research sits at the intersection of geomorphic and biological process to shape landforms. Gabet has previously taught at the University of Montana and the University of California at Riverside, and held a postdoctoral fellowship at the Institute for Crustal Studies at the University of California at Santa Barbara. He has received grants and fellowships from the National Science Foundation, US Department of Agriculture, and the Kearney Foundation of Soil Science.

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Damnationland: Six Short Horror Films by Maine Filmmakers

Damnationland: Six Short Horror Films by Maine Filmmakers

October 2, 20147:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

Damnationland, now in its fifth year, presents genre-defying original works from Maine filmmakers that redefine the classic thriller and horror categories.

Especially for the Halloween season, this Damnationland retrospective program will feature six short films produced in Maine by Mainers from 2010 through 2013.

These are dark, surreal, and fantastic pieces, and they offer film fans an excellent sampling of the talent producing independent film in Maine today.

Syrup (2013)
What begins as a quaint morning in New England becomes a nightmare over breakfast.
Through The Door Productions
Directed by Caroline O'Connor and Everett Bunker

Penelope: Once Upon A Time In The Woods (2013)
A dark fairy tale set in the Maine woods, where evil twists the imagination of a young girl as her older sister gets pulled to the horrors that lurk within.
Moving Circle Pictures
Directed by Jennifer Widor Smith

Last Call (2010)
The story of an ordinary man who has an epiphany and believes he must perform last rites on zombies because they still have souls. Zombie mayhem in Southern Maine.

Merrow (2012)
A study in the calm terror of the inevitable, "Merrow" tells an otherwordly love story between a man and his mistress of the sea. As their intense relationship winds towards its tragic end, the couple becomes more entwined in a macabre dance of strength, support, and codependence.
Written and directed by Allen Baldwin

Raid of the Vomit-Blood Fiends (2012)
All is well when a husband and wife discuss politics over a candlelit dinner. That is, until the butler misplaces the wine.
Written and directed by R.J. Wilson

Are You The Walkers? (2011) - . This film continues in the spirit of the traditional supernatural folktale. Two men seek to deter a creeping divergence in their friendship by retreating deep into the Maine woods for the weekend. Caught in a sudden and severe blizzard, their relationship unravels as they are visited by a voice that calls to them from the storm. Directed by Derek Kimball

To see more: www.damnationland.com


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Bowdoin Friends Book Lecture Series: Film

Bowdoin Friends Book Lecture Series: Film

October 2, 20147:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Richard III (1995), directed by Richard Loncraine, presented by Aaron Kitch, associate professor and chair of the English department. The film is being presented in conjunction with his talk on October 9, "Looking for Richard: The Many Faces of Shakespeare's Stage Villain." For more information about this, refer to the second issue of the Bowdoin Bulletin or call 207-725-3253.

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China in Africa: Think Again

China in Africa: Think Again

October 6, 20147:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Deborah Brautigam is Professor of Comparative Politics and Director of the International Development Program (IDEV), and the China Africa Research Initiative (CARI) at Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in Washington, DC. A leading expert on China in Africa, Professor Brautigam is the author of The Dragon's Gift: The Real Story of China in Africa (Oxford University Press, 2010; Chinese version published by Chinese Academy of Social Sciences Press) and Chinese Aid and African Development : Exporting Green Revolution (St. Martin's Press, 1998). She is also co-editor of Taxation and State-Building: Capacity and Consent (Cambridge University Press, 2008) as well as numerous articles published in academic journals and public affairs media. Professor Brautigam regularly advises international agencies and governments on China-Africa economic engagement, and is currently writing a book on China, Africa and global food security, focusing on the "land grab" issue.

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Gallery Conversations: "Drawing a Line from Tuttle to Goltzius"

Gallery Conversations: "Drawing a Line from Tuttle to Goltzius"

October 8, 201412:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

The prints of Hendrick Goltzius and Richard Tuttle will come to life in a gallery talk led by Carrie Scanga, Assistant Professor of Art, and Joachim Homann, Curator at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art. Presented in conjunction with the exhibitions, Hendrick Goltzius: Mythology and Truth and Richard Tuttle: A Print Retrospective.

Free and open to the public.

Photo: Pygmalion and Galatea, 1593, engraving by Hendrick Goltzius.




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Pop-Up Museum: Wish You Were Here! Travel Souvenirs

Pop-Up Museum: Wish You Were Here! Travel Souvenirs

October 8, 20146:30 PM – 8:30 PM
David Saul Smith Union, Morrell Lounge

A Pop-Up Museum is a temporary exhibit created by the people who show up at a venue to display their objects and share information about them.  It lasts a few hours and then is gone!

Do you have a favorite kind of object you collect when traveling?  Bring it to Smith Union the evening of October 8th.  Bowdoin College students and staff from Bowdoin's two museums and library will help you exhibit your treasure and share a story about it.  Or just come and see what others have brought!

*Bring an item that you can easily display on
  a table.
*Please, no live animals or plants.
*No weapons or objects that look like
  weapons.
*Nothing that requires an external source of
  power.

Sponsored by the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum, Bowdoin College Museum of Art, and Bowdoin College Library.




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Bowdoin Friends Book Lecture Series

Bowdoin Friends Book Lecture Series

October 9, 20147:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

The Association of Bowdoin Friends is pleased to continue this program. All members of the community are invited to read a good book and hear an excellent Bowdoin College professor lecture about it. There will be opportunity for questions. The event is free and open to the public. Just come, listen, and learn.


Associate Professor and Chair of the English Department Aaron Kitch will present:

"Looking for Richard: The Many Faces of Shakespear's Stage Villain"
Shakespeare's play, Tragedy of Richard III


How did Richard III, whose notorious defeat by the Earl of Richmond at the Battle of Bosworth in 1485 initiated the Tudor dynasty, become a dramatic symbol of evil in Shakespeare's day and our own? Why, moreover, have so many readers and viewers found Shakespeare's stage villain strangely likeable over the centuries? To address these fundamental questions, Professor Kitch will situate Shakespeare's Tragedy of Richard III in the context of Elizabethan ideologies of power and in relation to contemporary politics of representation as found in cinematic productions starring Laurence Olivier, Ian McKellen, and Al Pacino. Reading Richard as an enduring icon of evil also allows us to find some of Shakespeare's central methods for creating plot and character through complex irony.

Aaron Kitch teaches courses on early modern drama and culture, including "Shakespeare's Afterlives" and "Shakespeare in Theory." He is the author of Political Economy and the States of Literature in Early Modern England, as well as multiple essays on Renaissance literature and culture.




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Corazones de Mujer (film)

Corazones de Mujer (film)

October 15, 20147:30 PM – 10:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Once upon a time there was a tailor who made the best Arab clothing in the entire city: his name was Shakira (Aziz Ahmeri) and he was to make the wedding gown for a young woman who was soon to be married: Zina (Ghizlane Waldi).

The problem was that Zina had already lost her virginity and this is forbidden in the Arab world.

In order to return to "kilometer zero," the two decide to drive an old Alfa Romeo sports car from Torino all the way to Morocco and... this is the beginning of a voyage that will save her life.

Corazones de Mujer is a true story about a transvestite tailor originally from Morocco and an Arab bride-to-be who lives in Torino and has to regain her lost virginity.


Sponsored by the Mellon Humanities Initiative--Studies in the Mediterranean.

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Gallery Conversations: "Metamorphosis of a Myth"

Gallery Conversations: "Metamorphosis of a Myth"

October 16, 20144:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Linda Roth, Charles C. and Eleanor Lamont Cunningham Curator of European Decorative Arts at the Wadsworth Atheneum and James Higginbotham, Associate Professor of Classics on the Henry Johnson Professorship Fund and Classics Associate Curator for the Ancient Collection in the Museum of Art, explore the making and use of tapestries as well as the long history and central themes associated with the myth of Cupid and Psyche. The discussion will examine the making and use of tapestries and representations of this tale over time. Presented in conjunction with Weaving the Myth of Pysche: Baroque Tapestries from the Wadsworth Atheneum.

Free and open to the public.

Illustration: Psyche at the Temple at Ceres (detail), ca. 1660.  Wool, silk, and gold thread.  Courtesy of the Wadsworth Atheneum.

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Byrd and I: A Northern Evening with Rev. Robert Bryan

Byrd and I: A Northern Evening with Rev. Robert Bryan

October 16, 20147:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Rev. Robert Bryan, best known for his "Bert & I" stories, will entertain with tales about his career in Labrador and Quebec and his friendship with polar explorer Richard Byrd.  Rev. Bryan's talk marks the publication of his autobiography by Down East Books, and the donation to the Arctic Museum of a parka made from sealskins given to him by Byrd.

A book signing of Bryan's new memoir, "The Flying Parson and the Real Story Behind Bert and I," will take place after the talk.


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Is War Between The Great Powers Still Possible?

Is War Between The Great Powers Still Possible?

October 20, 20147:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Christopher Coker is Professor of International Relations at the London School of Economics. He was a NATO Fellow in 1981, and served two terms on the Council of the Royal United Services Institute. He is a serving member of the Washington Strategy Seminar; the Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis (Cambridge, Mass); the Black Sea University Foundation; the Moscow School of Politics and the IDEAS Advisory Board. He is a member of the Academic Board of the Czech Diplomatic Academy. He was a Visiting Fellow of Goodenough College in 2003-4. He is a member of the Executive Council for the Belgrade University International Summer School for Democracy and also President of the Centre for Media and Communications of a Democratic Romania. He is a former editor of The Atlantic Quarterly and The European Security Analyst. He has advised several Conservative Party think tanks including the Institute for European Defence and Strategic Studies and the Centre for Policy Studies and helped to draw up the Party's defence platform in the 1996 European Parliamentary Elections. He has written for The Wall Street Journal; The Wall St Journal (Europe); The Times; The Independent; The European, The Spectator, The Times Literary Supplement and The Literary Review. He is a regular lecturer at the Royal College of Defence Studies (London); the NATO Defence College (Rome), the Centre for International Security (Geneva) and the National Institute for Defence Studies (Tokyo) He has spoken at other military institutes in Western Europe, North America, Australia and South-east Asia.

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Brett Rogers: Tyrannical Teachers and Student-Citizens

Brett Rogers: Tyrannical Teachers and Student-Citizens

October 21, 20144:30 PM – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Professor Brett Rogers, University of Puget Sound, WA, will be joining the many conversations and debates we are having about the "usefulness" of a liberal arts education with his public lecture, "Tyrannical Teachers and Student-Citizens: Classical Greek Perspectives on Freedom and the Liberal Arts."  Support for this event provided by the Jasper Jacob Stahl Lectureship Fund.

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"Pieter Coecke van Aelst and the Art of Designing Tapestries in Early Modern Europe"

"Pieter Coecke van Aelst and the Art of Designing Tapestries in Early Modern Europe"

October 22, 20144:30 PM – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Elizabeth Cleland is the curator of the Metropolitan Museum's upcoming exhibition Grand Design: Pieter Coecke van Aelst and Renaissance Tapestry. Cleland speaks about this major figure of the Northern Renaissance who designed tapestries for the royal courts of Europe. The tapestries on view at the Museum are based on drawings by this Flemish master. Presented in conjunction with Weaving the Myth of Psyche: Tapestries from the Wadsworth Atheneum.

RSVPs are kindly requested, but not required.  You may RSVP here: http://thepsychetapestries.eventbrite.com or contact Christine Piontek at artmuseumevents@bowdoin.edu.

Free and open to the public.

Photo:  Elizabeth Cleland

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Helena Goscilo, "Seeing Red: Soviet Women in Graphic Form"

Helena Goscilo, "Seeing Red: Soviet Women in Graphic Form"

October 23, 20147:00 PM – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

The Soviet poster, which addressed the broad masses, was a genre ideally suited to the state's imperative of molding Soviet identity and everyday values while propagating the political ideology that fueled them. Goscilo examines the genre's convergence with official dicta in its assignment of gender roles, focusing primarily on the Soviet era. She takes into account the relationship between women's functions and achievements as urged or claimed by posters, on the one hand, and their everyday reality, on the other.

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President's Science Symposium

President's Science Symposium

October 24, 20141:00 PM – 3:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Keynote for President's Science Symposium
Sarah Elgin, Department of Biology, Washington University, St. Louis

Prof. Elgin is a pioneer of the field of epigenetics and gene regulation, and is also noted for her contributions to science education. She is a professor at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute where she has spearheaded the Genomics Education Partnership, which aims to bring genomics research into the undergraduate science courses.

Following the keynote presentation, nominated Bowdoin student researchers will be featured as lecturers.

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Threatened and Endangered: Flora and Fauna of Maine: Artist's Books by Rebecca Goodale

Threatened and Endangered: Flora and Fauna of Maine: Artist's Books by Rebecca Goodale

October 28, 20147:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Book artist Rebecca Goodale will present an illustrated talk about her multi-year project to create artist's books documenting all of the plants and animals on Maine's "Threatened and Endangered Species" lists.
The talk is presented in conjunction with an exhibition of Goodale's work, on display in Hawthorne-Longfellow Library, and a related library exhibition, "Envisioning Extinctions," curated by Prof. Susan Wegner (Art History). A reception in the library will follow the talk.

This lecture is sponsored by the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund, the Association of Bowdoin Friends, and the Bowdoin College Library.

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