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Academic Life
New Augmented Reality Sandbox Mesmerizes...and Demonstrates Hydrology in Action

The tool is Bowdoin's new augmented sandbox, which mesmerizes while it demonstrates hydrological and geological concepts, such as how water moves through land, both during floods and in droughts.

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Student Life
Bowdoin Snolympics Tests Brains and Brawn in a Lot of Snow

The Bowdoin Outing Club organized a four-hour Snolympics on Friday afternoon, putting students through a series of challenges in about two feet of powdery snow. The competition included a series of events like "fire building," "human sled dog racing," "layer up," and "snowball archery." On Saturday, Bowdoin also held its annual Winter Weekend, offering horse-drawn carriage rides, ho chocolate and s'mores, a polar plunge and snow-globe making. Reed House stages a broomball tournament

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Featured video

  • Bowdoin Snolympics Tests Brains and Braw...

    Bowdoin Snolympics Tests Brains and Brawn in a Lot of Snow
  • New Augmented Reality Sandbox Mesmerizes...

    New Augmented Reality Sandbox Mesmerizes...and Demonstrates Hydrology in Action
  • John Hagan: "From Soft-Shell Clams to So...

    John Hagan: "From Soft-Shell Clams to Soft-Shell Crabs: Two Practical Solutions for Adapting to a Warming Gulf of Maine"
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    Students Join Portland Rally to Protest Trump's Immigration Order
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    Stanley F. Druckenmiller ?75, H?07 To Offer Investor's Perspective on Trump, Trade and Global Populism
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    Alternative Winter Break Trips Focus on Complex Social Issues
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    Vivid 2,000-year-old Mummy Mask on Display at Art Museum, Feb. 2-July 15

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Featured Events

Gallery Conversation: "Modern Medieval: Materiality and Spirituality in German Expressionism"

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February 21, 2017 12:00 PM  – 1:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Honor Wilkinson, Curatorial Assistant, will discuss the variety of influences of western medieval visual culture on German expressionists' artistic production and thought in the early twentieth century. Organized in conjunction with the exhibition Modern Medieval: Materiality and Spirituality in German Expressionism.

Free and open to the public.

Illustration: Detail from Crucifixion (Gekreuzigter), 1918, woodcut, by Karl Schmidt-Rottluff, German 1884-1976. Museum Purchase, Art Objects Fund. Bowdoin College Museum of Art. 

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Film: 'Angry Inuk'

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February 21, 2017 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

With the film Angry Inuk, director Alethea Arnaqaq-Baril joins a new tech-savvy generation of Inuit as they campaign to challenge long-established perceptions of seal hunting and help push for a sustainable way to take part in the global economy amidst the opposition army of well-funded activists and well-meaning celebrities.

The 2016 Canadian feature-length documentary defends the hunts, arguing that they are  the a vital means for Inuit peoples to sustain themselves. Subjects in Angry Inuk include Arnaquq-Baril as well as Aaju Peter, an Inuit seal hunt advocate, lawyer and seal fur clothing designer who depends on the sealskins for her livelihood. 

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Ann Little: "The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright"

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February 22, 2017 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Hubbard Hall, Thomas F. Shannon Room [208]

Esther Wheelwright was an English girl from Wells, Maine, who was captured during an attack of her village during Queen Anne's War in 1703 by a group of French-Canadians and Wabanaki Indians, or First Nations Peoples. For five years, Wheelwright was raised by the French-allied Catholic Wabanaki, and then was brought to Quebec where she was placed in the school of the Ursulines of Quebec. She remained there the rest of her life, becoming a choir nun and eventually the Mother Superior of the convent in the immediate aftermath of the 1759 British conquest of Quebec. 

Ann Little, author of The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright, will discuss how Esther is notable not only for having lived in three major North American cultures, but also because she was and remains the only foreign-born Mother Superior the Ursulines of Quebec have ever elected.

In this "intriguing new biography," Ann Little spins a tale that is "unique in its details, but ends up telling a larger story about the lives of women in the region, as well as religion, warfare, status, human nature and rivalry on a local and world stage. This is a book that deserves a permanent place on any bookshelf dedicated to the history of Maine." - William David Barry, Portland Press Herald

Born on the Great Lakes near the US-Canadian border, Little is associate professor of history at Colorado State University and the author of Abraham in Arms: War and Gender in Colonial New England. She lives in Greeley,Colorado.

Sponsored by the Departments of History and Religion, and the Gender, Sexuality and Women's Program.

Open to the public and free of charge.

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Meegan Kennedy: The Lantern Microscope, the Animalcule-cage, and the Moving Image

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February 23, 2017 4:30 PM  – 5:30 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

In George Eliot's classic novel, Middlemarch, the character of Dr. Tertius Lydgate mistakenly believed he could discover a "primitive tissue" with the powerful light of the oxy-hydrogen microscope.  Although not an important research instrument, the microscope - powered by theatrical "lime-light" -  was a form of magic lantern. Audiences thrilled to see microscopic animalcules projected in "live" motion in a prologue to the cinematic experience.

In this talk, Meegan Kennedy will discuss how the microscope, the most valuable instrument of scientific culture, thus engenders not just professional work and popular science education but also spectacular, fraudulent entertainment. Even as Victorian scientists achieved a tenuous, bounded professionalism, they had to negotiate the integral relation between their tools and the mass-mediated visual narratives of modern culture.

Kennedy is associate professor of English at Florida State University and core faculty with the History and Philosophy of Science Program. She teaches courses on nineteenth-century British culture, focusing on literature and science, literature and medicine, and the history and theory of the novel.

Kennedy's publications include Revising the Clinic: Vision and Representation in Victorian Medical Narrative and the Novel, which examines the interplay between medical case histories and British novels from the eighteenth century to the age of Freud. Other publications include: "Tono-Bungay and Burroughs Wellcome: Branding Imperial Popular Medicine," "True Prophet: Speculation in Victorian Sensory Physiology and George Eliot,"The Lifted Veil," "Let me die in your house': Cardiac Distress and Sympathy in Nineteenth-Century British Medicine"; and "Modernist Autobiography, Hysterical Narrative, and the Unnavigable River: The Case of Freud and H.D."


Presented by the English Department, and sponsored by the Cinema Studies Program, and the Departments of Biology and History. 








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Open House at the Museum of Art

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February 23, 2017 6:00 PM  – 7:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Celebrate the exhibition "Modern Medieval: Materiality and Spirituality in German Expressionism."  Refreshments will be served

Open to the public free of charge.

Illustration:   Josef Eberz, German, Klosteranwesen (Cloister Lands), 1918, (detail), lithograph. Museum Purchase, Susan Dwight Bliss Fund. Bowdoin College Museum of Art

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"Performing Art": Bowdoin Student Performances in the Museum Galleries

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February 23, 2017 7:00 PM  – 8:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

The Bowdoin Slam Poets Society and students in the Theater and Dance Department will respond to the works on view at the Museum and reflect on personal experiences through their own forms of performance art—poetry, dance, and story-telling. The Slam Poets Society is a student organization that brings awareness to social and political issues, as well as reflecting on personal experience through the form of poetry.

Free and open to the public.

Illustration: Dance students performing in the Museum of Art

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William R. Kenan Professor of Physics Inaugural Lecture - Thomas W. Baumgarte: "Matters of Gravity"

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February 23, 2017 7:30 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Professor Thomas W. Baumgarte will deliver the William R. Kenan Professor of Physics Inaugural Lecture entitled, "Matters of Gravity."

The Kenan Professorship was established in 1975 by the William R. Kenan Jr. Charitable Trust to honor a distinguished chemist, engineer, farmer, industrialist, and philanthropist. Kenan co-discovered a process for deriving acetylene gas from calcium carbide, and he designed electric carbide plants around the world for Union Carbide Co. In keeping with the spirit of his life and the terms of his will, the Kenan Professorship supports and encourages "a scholar-teacher whose enthusiasm for learning, commitment to teaching, and sincere personal interest in students will enhance the learning process."

Sponsored by the William R. Kenan Jr. Charitable Trust.

Free and open to the public.

  This event will be streamed live.

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Book Release and Discussion - Megan Roberts: "Sentimental Savants: Philosophical Families in Enlightenment France"

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March 2, 2017 4:30 PM  – 7:00 PM
Hubbard Hall, Thomas F. Shannon Room [208]

Though many might imagine scientific or philosophical geniuses as lone characters generating insights in isolation, the families of scientists and philosophers in the Enlightenment played a substantial role, not only making space for inquiry within the home but also assisting in observing, translating, calculating, and illustrating.

In her book Sentimental Savants, Megan Roberts explores the place of the family among the savants of the French Enlightenment, a group that openly embraced their domestic lives, even going so far as to test out their ideas on their own children. She will discuss those ideas and the and point to examples in the lives of the major figures she profiles in her work. 

Moderated by Dallas Denery, chair and professor of history.

Roberts is assistant professor of history at Bowdoin. She is a historian of early modern Europe and the Atlantic World with particular interests in cultural history and the history of science and medicine.

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Luca Grillo: "Decoding the Irony of Cicero: Between Rhetoric and Neuroscience"

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March 2, 2017 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Luca Grillo, Kenan Scholar and Associate Professor of Classics at UNC-Chapel Hill, will demonstrate how incorporating theories of irony recently put forward by psychologists and cognitive scientists can help us better understand works of classical literature. Using some speeches by Cicero as test cases, Grillo will first look at instances of what can be called "traditional irony," that is, cases when irony fits the definitions of ancient manuals of rhetoric. He will then show that, in some other cases, classical definitions fail to explain many of Cicero's uses of irony. Grillo will conclude by arguing that certain models from cognitive linguistics and neuroscience can provide helpful language and heuristic tools to account for Cicero's use of "non-traditional" irony, and help us better appreciate both Cicero's linguistic nuance and rhetorical complexity.

Sponsored by the Departments of Classics, Neuroscience, History, and the Mellon Initiative in Mediterranean Studies.

Free and open to the public.
 


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John James Audubon in Maine

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March 2, 2017 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Peter B. Logan, Bowdoin Class of 1975 and author of the new biography, Audubon: America's Greatest Naturalist and His Voyage of Discovery to Labrador, discusses John James Audubon's connections to Maine, his correspondence with early Bowdoin professor Parker Cleaveland, and how Bowdoin ultimately came to hold one of the remarkable double-elephant editions of the Birds of America.

Free and open to the public.

Presented by the Bowdoin College Library.






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Theater Performance: 'Eurydice' by Sarah Ruhl

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March 2, 2017 7:30 PM  – 9:00 PM
Memorial Hall, Wish Theater

Eurydice is a contemporary, theatrical event that explores the power and limits of love, loss and memory.

Eurydice leaves her wedding with Orpheus for the underworld, searching for her father - but the reunion is costly. Trapped on the opposite side of death, Orpheus fights to retrieve his bride, making a deal that seals both their fates.

Celebrated by the New York Times as a "weird and wonderful new play", playwright Sarah Ruhl explores the ancient Greek myth from the female perspective and with a fresh eye.

Tickets are free. Advanced tickets can be reserved starting February 9, 2017 at Smith Union (207-725-3375) or at the door on the night of the performance. Limited Seating.

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Theater Performance: 'Eurydice' by Sarah Ruhl

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March 3, 2017 7:30 PM  – 9:00 PM
Memorial Hall, Wish Theater

Eurydice is a contemporary, theatrical event that explores the power and limits of love, loss and memory. 

Eurydice leaves her wedding with Orpheus for the underworld, searching for her father - but the reunion is costly. Trapped on the opposite side of death, Orpheus fights to retrieve his bride, making a deal that seals both their fates. 

Celebrated by the New York Times as a "weird and wonderful new play", playwright Sarah Ruhl explores the ancient Greek myth from the female perspective and with a fresh eye.

Tickets are free. Advanced tickets can be reserved starting February 9, 2017 at Smith Union (207-725-3375) or at the door on the night of the performance. Limited Seating. 

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Reception and Commemoration: 300 Years at the First Parish Church and Harriet's Vision

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March 4, 2017 2:00 PM  – 5:00 PM
Harriet's Writing Room

Join performer and Harriet Beecher Stowe-impersonator Elizabeth Davidson at a reception to celebrate the 300th anniversary of the First Parish Church's first public worship. Davidson, dressed as Stowe, will "recall" her 1851 vision at the First Parish Church that inspired her writing of Uncle Tom's Cabin, the classic anti-slavery novel.

Free and open to the public.

Presented by the Bowdoin College Library and co-sponsored by First Parish Church, United Church of Christ, 217 Maine Street.

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Theater Performance: 'Eurydice' by Sarah Ruhl

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March 4, 2017 7:30 PM  – 9:00 PM
Memorial Hall, Wish Theater

Eurydice is a contemporary, theatrical event that explores the power and limits of love, loss and memory. 

Eurydice leaves her wedding with Orpheus for the underworld, searching for her father - but the reunion is costly. Trapped on the opposite side of death, Orpheus fights to retrieve his bride, making a deal that seals both their fates. 

Celebrated by the New York Times as a "weird and wonderful new play", playwright Sarah Ruhl explores the ancient Greek myth from the female perspective and with a fresh eye.

Tickets are free. Advanced tickets can be reserved starting February 9, 2017 at Smith Union (207-725-3375) or at the door on the night of the performance. Limited Seating. 

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Kibbe Science Lecture - Dr. Gabriela Gonzalez: "Einstein, Gravitational Waves and Black Holes"

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March 29, 2017 7:30 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

More than hundred years ago, Einstein predicted that space time was dynamic, and there were ripples in space time traveling at the speed of light, or gravitational waves. On September 14 2015, the two LIGO detectors in Hanford, Washington and Livingston, Louisiana registered, for the first time ever, a loud gravitational wave signal traveling through Earth, created more than a billion years ago from the merger of two black holes. A few months later in December, another signal, also from black holes, was  detected. These observations marked the beginning of gravitational wave astronomy. Dr. Gabriela Gonzalez will describe the exciting details of the observation, the status of gravitational wave detectors, and the gravity-bright future of the field.


Dr. Gabriela Gonzalez is an experimental physicist who has successfully led the LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory) Scientific Collaboration for the past five years. Gonzalez was born and raised in Cordoba, Argentina. She studied physics at the University of Cordoba, where she earned a Master of Science degree. She came to the U.S. to pursue and attain her Ph.D. from Syracuse University. Her doctorate focused on Brownian motion and gravitational waves. Her work took her to universities across the U.S. including MIT, Penn State and LSU. She is currently a professor of physics and astronomy at Louisiana State University and was recently named one of the top 10 scientists in the world by the scientific journal Nature.

Sponsored by the Kibbe Science Lecture Fund.

Free and open to the public.







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