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Seven Bowdoin Faculty Granted Tenure

At its recent meeting in Boston (February 4-6, 2016), the Bowdoin College Board of Trustees promoted seven faculty members to tenured positions.

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Featured Events

Student Art Show: Activism and Social Justice - Part of Black History Month

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February 15, 20167:00 P.M. – 8:00 P.M.
David Saul Smith Union, Lamarche Gallery

As part of the celebration of Black history month, students will showcase artwork along with poetry/spoken word based on the themes of activism and social justice.


Sponsored by the Af-Am Society.

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James Gimpel: "Big Data Insights for Political Campaigns and Elections"

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February 15, 20167:00 P.M. – 8:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Is big data really something new, or is it simply a new name for the same old data that social scientists, government agencies, and market research companies have relied upon for years? These are questions a lot of people are asking these days, especially when it comes to the use of voter and consumer information in political campaigns. 
James G. Gimpel, professor of government at the University of Maryland, College Park, will talk about his research into voters and donors using big data and address the ways in which political campaigns are now using very large files to make inferences about voters' attitudes and behaviors. He will explain the serious problems and pitfalls that we have not yet overcome in many of these efforts - from using data to microtarget voters by their presumed political interests, to creating large prospect lists for fundraising, to using data for random control trials.  
Gimpel has served on the faculty at the University of Maryland since 1992. He holds a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Chicago. His research has focused on political behavior, campaigns and elections, public opinion and immigration politics and policy. 
Sponsored by the Bowdoin Departments of Government and Digital & Computational Studies
Watch this event live at bowdoin.edu/live

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Gallery Conversation - Historian David Gordon

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February 16, 201612:00 P.M. – 1:00 P.M.
Museum of Art, Pavilion

David Gordon, Bowdoin College professor of history, discusses the significance of selected objects from central Africa within their original cultural and religious contexts. Gordon is the author of Invisible Agents: Spirits in a Central African History (2012).

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Earth Matters: Land as Material and Metaphor in the Arts of Africa.

Free and open to the public.

Photo: Installation view of Earth Matters: Land as Material and Metaphor in the Arts of Africa

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Judith Casselberry: "Why do African-American Women Matter in America?"

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February 16, 20168:00 P.M. – 9:00 P.M.
Ladd House, Living Room

This year the African-American Society, in collaboration with the Africana Studies Department, will be hosting a lecture series entitled: "Why African-American _____ Matters in America".

This series will allow students, faculty, and staff to learn about different issues within the African-American community and how they play into the American conscious.

The final lectures is entitled: Why Do African American Women Matter in America? and will be presented by Judity Casselberry, assistant professor of Africana studies.

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David Driskell and Johnnetta Cole in Discussion: African Art and the Exhibition 'Earth Matters'

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February 17, 20164:30 P.M. – 6:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Johnnetta Cole, director, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution and artist and educator David Driskell H'89 discuss the exhibition Earth Matters: Land as Material and Metaphor in the Arts of Africa and the impact of African art in the United States. Presented by the Bowdoin College Museum of Art.  Free and open to the public. Installation view: Earth Matters: Land as Material and Metaphor in the Arts in Africa

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Panel Discussion: "It's Time to Face Human Trafficking in Maine"

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February 17, 20167:00 P.M. – 9:00 P.M.
Searles Science Building, Room 315

Human trafficking happens every day, in every state, yet is too often concealed from the public. In order to raise awareness about the prevalence of trafficking in the US, survivors of human trafficking will join legal and healthcare professionals who are combating human trafficking in a panel discussion at Bowdoin.

This panel intends to educate students, faculty, staff, and the local community on human trafficking in Maine, New England, and the United States.

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Bradley Borthwick Artist Talk and Reception: The Entablature and the Nave Sculpture Exhibition

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February 18, 20164:15 P.M. – 6:00 P.M.
Edwards Arts Center, Room 115 [Digital Media Lab]

Please join us for an artist talk by Bradley Borthwick, Assistant Professor of Sculpture at Colby College, whose work The Entablature and the Nave will be on view from February 13 to March 10, 2016 in the Edwards Gallery.The talk will be followed by a reception in the gallery.

Rather than concentrate on one medium, Bradley Borthwick engages a plurality of modes:  sculpture, performance, site specificity, narrative, and photographic document.  Borthwick received his Bachelor of Landscape Architecture from the University of Guelph and his Master of Fine Arts in Sculpture from Cornell University.  Previous faculty appointments with the University of the Fraser Valley, the University of Colorado Denver, and the Metropolitan State College of Denver, all support Borthwick?s current aspiration as an Assistant Professor of Art at Colby College.  He resides in Belgrade, Maine, having arrived there only one year ago from Vancouver, British Columbia. He has recently returned from stone-carving residencies in County Donegal, Ireland and Gunnison County, Colorado.  In addition to projects sited in Canada, France, and Ireland, Borthwick has exhibited his sculptural and installation-based works at galleries in Colorado and New York.
 
Borthwick strives to master materials such that the objects he generates will remain physically intact far beyond his lifetime.  His practice results from an interest in pre-industrial objects? conceptual and material significance.  This has meant his work takes various forms, including historical research, material experimentation, performance, and photographic documentation.  Where earlier works involved making representational objects, more recent activities concentrate on the utilitarian function of historical tools.  Such a ?return to a real? demands a deeper and more mimetic relation to past modes in production, which is made possible through archival research.  As a means to understand pre-industrial ways of making, Borthwick constructs his works using primary materials: wood, bronze, beeswax, stone, and leather.  In his interest to construct an object?s reference to a previous modality, Borthwick locates his practice as a means to present a critical alternative to contemporary mass production.  Currently, Borthwick works with elementary materials as a means to develop a sensitivity to objects that have, for many of us, withered due to our alienation from the production of everyday objects ? a loss he believes is symptomatic of the transient plenitude of consumer goods.  In contrast, the objects Borthwick creates are made from materials chosen for their qualities of temporal endurance and for their significance to the intended site.


This event is Sponsored by the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund, the Lectures and Concerts Committee, and the Departments of Visual Arts, Art History, and Sociology and Anthropology.

Photo credit: Bradley Borthwick, Entablature and the Nave, sculpture detail, 2015, beeswax, 20" x 35" x 3"

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Jennifer Yoder: "Angela Merkel, the Construction of Collective Memory and Germany's Response to the Refugee Crisis"

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February 18, 20164:15 P.M. – 6:30 P.M.
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Jennifer Yoder's talk addresses German Chancellor Angela Merkel's role in shaping discourses about the past and the implications for German values and policy. Yoder analyzes forty-three of her speeches since 2006, with a focus on one of her first public statements about the refugee crisis along with the speeches of fall 2015. It is part of the 'German Voices in Europe' series.

Yoder is the Robert E. Diamond Professor of Government and Global Studies at Colby College.  She is the author of From East Germans to Germans? The New Post-Communist Elite (1999) and Crafting Democracy: Regional Politics in Post-Communist Europe (2013).  Her articles have appeared in Aus Politik und Zeitgeschichte, German Politics and Society, German Politics, German Studies Review, East European Politics and Societies, Europe-Asia Studies and Regional and Federal Studies.

Sponsored by the Department of German.  

Free and open to the public.

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Marilyn Gunner: "Proton Gradients: The Cellular Energy Storehouse"

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February 19, 20163:00 P.M. – 4:00 P.M.
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Dr. Marilyn Gunner is a professor of physics at the City College of New York. In her lecture, she will explore how the transmembrane electrochemical gradient fuels cell function; coupled electron and proton transfers through transmembrane proteins of photosynthesis and oxygenic respiration form the gradient. She will discuss the minimum design requirements for proton transfer from the high pH, N-side to low pH P-side of the membrane through proteins and how the protein must have several sites that change proton affinity through the reaction cycle and at lest two gates that can change conformation to allow or stop proton transfers.

Molecular simulations using classical electrostatics and Monte Carlo sampling have been used to analyze a range of membrane proteins including the bacteriorhodopsin and cytochrome c oxidase proton pumps. Gunner will show several motifs that allow proteins to change proton affinity at specific sites without large conformation changes and describe proton transfer pathways and the barriers to proton hopping along these paths.

Gunner earned her bachelor's degree from the University of New York at Binghamton, and her PhD from the University of Pennsylvania.

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Bowdoin Breakfast featuring Katrina Lake, Founder and CEO of Stitch Fix

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February 22, 20167:00 A.M. – 9:00 A.M.
Miscellaneous 2

Inspired by the opportunity to create a truly personalized shopping experience by blending the best of the brick and mortar retail experience with an innovative approach to data and technology, Katrina Lake founded Stitch Fix while she was a student at Harvard Business School. Since 2011, Katrina hired a world-class executive team with experience from major companies including Netflix, Walmart.com, Nike and lululemon, and has grown the company to over 1,500 employees across the country.

Prior to founding Stitch Fix, Katrina honed her skill set at the intersection of fashion, retail, and technology at social commerce company Polyvore and consulted with a variety of e-commerce and traditional retailers during her time at The Parthenon Group. She also invested in and worked with dozens of entrepreneurs and start-ups at Leader Ventures.

Katrina holds a B.S. in Economics from Stanford University and an M.B.A. from Harvard Business School, and serves on the board of directors and audit committee of food delivery service GrubHub.

The program begins at 7:15 a.m. on Monday, February 22nd in Thorne Hall (room TBD). Reservations are required and may be made by sending your student ID number, department project number, or a check for $12 made out to Bowdoin College, to the Office of Stewardship Programs by Monday, February 8th.

If you have any questions, please contact Sue Lindsey at slindsey@bowdoin.edu, or 725-3928.  For more information visit: http://www.bowdoin.edu/bowdoin-breakfast/

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Lisa Maurizio, "Nymphs and Dice: On Myth and History at Delphi"

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February 22, 20167:00 P.M. – 9:00 P.M.
Druckenmiller Hall, Cleaveland 151

At the center of Apollo's shrine at Delphi is the Pythia, Apollo's priestess, who offered oracles to clients seeking answers. The Pythia is also believed to have used beans in a bowl - as in the image here - to answer clients' questions. But the evidence about beans occurs only in mythical stories of nymphs who haunted the caves in the mountains at Delphi. There archaeologists have found thousands of dice used for divination. 

In her talk, Lisa Maurizio parses myths, inscriptions, and archaeological evidence to better understand the range of divinatory techniques at Delphi.

Maurizio is associate professor of classical and Medieval studies program at Bates College. She teaches courses in Greek and Latin languages and literatures on a range of authors and topics, including Roman love poetry, Senecan tragedy, archaic Greek poetry, Greek romances and saints' lives. She also teaches courses on Greek and Roman myths, Greek temple art, gender politics in archaic and classical Greece, and psychoanalytic approaches to, and appropriation of, Greek myths. Her research focuses on Greek religion, especially Delphic divination, religious language, and women's religious activities.

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Deborah Steinberger: "Real Time with Donneau de Vise: The Mercure Galant and the Origins of Modern Journalism"

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February 22, 20167:30 P.M. – 9:30 P.M.
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Le Mercure Galant (1672-1710), one of France's first newspapers, is a curious amalgam: part People magazine, part tabloid, part fashion revue, part propaganda vehicle. Many of its innovations appear in today's journalism: its encouragement of reader participation has inspired comparisons to blogging and to Facebook, and its blending of hard and soft news, and of fact and fiction, to the phenomenon of "infotainment." 

Can print journalism as practiced in the late seventeenth century by editor-in-chief Donneau de Vise, mouthpiece of an early modern totalitarian monarchy, be legitimately compared to the multimedia journalistic production of twenty-first century democracies? 
This talk will attempt to answer this question as it highlights the following topics: real-time reporting, or accelerated communication; the women's magazine, or its latest avatar, "chicklit"; and participatory journalism (blogging and its ancestors).

Discussion will follow the lecture. 
Free and open to the public.

Sponsored by the Departments of Romance Languages and Literatures, English and History, the Lindsay Fund for Guest Lecturers and the Medieval and Early Modern Studies Mellon Initiative.

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Brett Walker: "Natural and Unnatural Disasters: 3/11, Asbestos, and the Unmaking of the Modern World"

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February 23, 20167:00 P.M. – 9:00 P.M.
Searles Science Building, Room 315

The natural catastrophe of the 3/11 Tohoku Earthquake and ensuing tsunami unleashed an unnatural disaster of environmental pollution when waves pulverized the Japanese built environment, releasing asbestos and other carcinogenic toxins that continue to contaminate reconstruction efforts.

Join Brett Walker is Regents Professor and Michael P. Malone Professor of History at Montana State University and a current visiting professor at Harvard University. He will discuss the environmental impact of asbestos and the risks it poses to human health around the world.

Supported by the departments of History, Asian Studies, Biology, Environmental Studies and Government and Legal Studies.  

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A Reading by Poet and Novelist Paul Beatty - English Department Visiting Writers Series

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February 23, 20167:00 P.M. – 9:00 P.M.
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

Poet and novelist Paul Beatty will read from a selection of his works.

Beatty's recognition as the Grand Poetry Slam Champion of the Nuyorican Poets Cafe in 1990 resulted in the publication of his first volume of poetry, Big Bank Take Little Bank. This was followed by Joker, Joker, Deuce, another collection of poems.

Beatty's first novel, The White Boy Shuffle (1996) was described in a New York Times review as "a blast of satirical heat from the talented heart of black American life." He published another novel, Tuff, in 1998. In 2006, he edited Hokum, an anthology of African-American humor and published an article in The New York Times on the same subject. Another novel, Slumberland, was published in 2008. His most recent novel, The Sellout, was released in 2015.

Beatty has read and performed his poetry on MTV and in the PBS series The United States of Poetry. He received a Foundation for Contemporary Arts Grants-to-Artists Award in 1993. Beatty received an MFA in creative writing from Brooklyn College and an MA in psychology from Boston University.

Sponsored by the English Department Visiting Writers Series.

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Aimee and Mark Bessire: "Africa Schoolhouse: Shaping Education Literally and Metaphorically in Tanzania"

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February 24, 20164:30 P.M. – 6:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Aimee Bessire, visiting associate professor, art and visual culture, Bates College, and Mark Bessire, Director, Portland Museum of Art, discuss the founding of Africa Schoolhouse, a nonprofit organization dedicated to bringing quality education to rural villages in Northern Tanzania, and the impact of African art in the United States. 


They will be joined by architects Pamela W. Hawkes and T. Scott Teas, of Scattergood Design, who have worked with the Bessires on the construction of the first girls' boarding school in rural Misungwi District, providing a safe educational environment through sustainable architecture.

Presented in conjunction the exhibition Earth Matters: Land as Material and Metaphor in the Arts of Africa at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art.

Free and open to the public.

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'Wonder' Author R.J. Palacio to Speak on Campus

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February 24, 20167:00 P.M. – 8:15 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

R.J. Palacio is the author of Wonder, the number-one New York Times bestseller about a boy born with a facial difference who enters a mainstream school for the first time. She is the parent of a Bowdoin student and lives in New York City with her husband, two sons, and two dogs.

Palacio will deliver a lecture about how she came to write the book, and how it has sparked the "Choose Kind" movement. She will also be signing books, which will be made available for purchase.

The event is open to the public and seating is first come, first served. The event will be live-streamed at bowdoin.edu/live and archived at BowdoinTalks, talks.bowdoin.edu.

For more information, contact the Education Department at 725-3733, or e-mail schingos@bowdoin.edu. Sponsored by the education department.

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Gallery Conversation - Historian Jen Scanlon: ''Dissent in 1960s America: The Photography of Ken Thompson"

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February 25, 20164:30 P.M. – 5:30 P.M.
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Jennifer Scanlon, William R. Kenan Jr. professor of the humanities in gender and women's studies and interim dean for academic affairs, leads a discussion in the exhibition Dissent in 1960s America: The Photography of Ken Thompson. The discussion focuses on civil rights leader Anna Arnold Hedgeman, who is included in Thompson's work and is the subject of Scanlon's new book, Until There is Justice: The Life of Anna Arnold Hedgeman.

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Dissent in 1960s America: The Photography of Ken Thompson. 


Presented by the Bowdoin College Museum of Art. 

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Anthony Carrasquillo '07: "Formation and Chemical Evolution of Organic Aerosol Particles from Radical Intermediates"

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February 26, 20163:00 P.M. – 4:00 P.M.
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Atmospheric particulate matter (or "aerosol") has important implications for public health, climate change, and visibility. The ability to predict its formation and fate is hindered by uncertainties associated with one type in particular, organic aerosol (OA). In this presentation, Anthony Carrasquillo '07 will examine how the study of the chemistry underlying OA formation is complicated by the large number of reaction pathways and oxidation generations for a given precursor species. 

Carrasquillo will discuss a series of experiments in which the chemistry is simplified to that of a single alkoxy radical (RO) isomer generated from the direct photolysis of alkyl nitrites (RONO) and explain how OA was generated from eleven different C10 RO isomers to determine the role of radical molecular structure in the formation of low-volatility species. He will detail how a method was developed to investigate the reactivity of alkoxy radicals in the condensed phase and how the long chain C20 RO radical was generated in hexane solvent to identify possible intermolecular (bimolecular) reactions with the condensed-phase. Finally, a molecular-level study of this same condensed-phase system with a soft ionization technique permitted the observation of molecular ions assigned to specific oxidation products. This approach enables the determination of the extent of branching for another important intermediate, the alkylperoxy radical.

Carrasquillo is a postdoctoral research associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He received his PhD from MIT and his bachelor's degree in chemistry at Bowdoin. 

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Francophone Film Festival: 'Bande de filles' ('Girlhood')

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February 26, 20167:00 P.M. – 10:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Girlhood, Céline Sciamma's third feature, continues to probe what
has been this perceptive writer-director's abiding interest: female
pubescence and adolescence, the stage when bodies and identities
are still in flux. Set in the impoverished banlieues that ring Paris and
are home to many of its French-African denizens, Girlhood focuses on
Marieme (Karidja Toure), a sixteen-year-old who assumes responsibility
for her two younger sisters while their mother works the night shift; the
teenager must also frequently absorb the wrath of her tyrannical slightly
older brother. School provides no haven from these hardships; having
already repeated a grade twice, Marieme is told that vocational training
is her only option. Rather than accept this indignity, she falls in with a
triad of tough girls, abandoning her braids for straightened hair, her
hoodie for a leather jacket - and learning the pleasures of raising hell at
malls in Les Halles, and impromptu dance-offs on the Métro.  Led by the swaggering Lady (Assa Sylla), this crew - whose members are all played by charismatic first-time performers - boosts Marieme's confidence. "You have to do what you want," Lady exhorts her; patiently and astutely, Girlhood follows Marieme as she tries to put this mantra into practice while being repeatedly reminded of her severely limited options.

 "It's the feminist answer to "Boyhood," yet it manages to dig deeper...Girlhood is one of the most exceptional films you'll see this year. Truly a must-see. Highly recommended!!" Jeff Nelson, DVD Talk

DIRECTOR:
Céline Sciamma
SCREENPLAY:
Céline Sciamma
CAST:
Lindsay Karamoh,
Assa Sylla,
Karidja Touré,
Marietou Touré.

See more at: http://face-foundation.org/tournees-film-festival/bande-de-filles-girlhood/#sthash.2dX1wAbU.dpuf


Presented as part of the Bowdoin Francophone Film Festival, a part of the Tournees Festival, and made possible with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the US, the Centre National de la Cinematographie et de l'Image Animee, and the Franco-American Cultural Fund.

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Francophone Film Festival: 'Clouds of Sils Maria'

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February 27, 20167:00 P.M. – 10:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Olivier Assayas's magnificent Clouds of Sils Maria explores the unstable boundaries between performing and being. Juliette Binoche plays Maria Enders, an internationally renowned star; Kristen Stewart, as Valentine, is Maria's personal assistant. Maria, who's "sick of acting on wires in front of green screens," is considering whether to star in a revival of the stage drama that launched her career twenty years ago, in which she played a cunning ingenue who seduces, abandons, and then drives to suicide her older boss. In the remounting, Maria is to portray the spurned middle-aged lover; the part she originally inhabited is offered to Jo-Ann Ellis (Chloe Grace Moretz), a rising phenomenon with a Lindsay Lohan-likepenchant for scandal and self-destruction. Though Valentine's position requires constant deference to her employer, the aide doesn't hesitate to challenge her boss. In one crucial scene, she offers a passionate defense of blockbusters, the well-reasoned words emerging from the mouth of the young woman who, in real life, starred in one of the biggest moviefranchises of all time. Throughout Clouds of Sils Maria, the ingeniously cast performers refract and reflect their own off-screen personae, creating a hall-of-mirrors experience that is never less than exhilarating.

"Daring. Exhilarating. Precious and rare. A multi-layered, femme-driven metafiction that pushes all involved - including next-gen starlets Kristen Stewart and Chloe Grace Moretz - to new heights...Rich and tantalizingly open ended." - Peter Debruge, Variety

DIRECTOR:Olivier Assayas
SCREENPLAY:Olivier Assayas
CAST:Juliette Binoche, Chloe Grace Moretz, Kristen Stewart

See more at: http://face-foundation.org/tournees-film-festival/sils-maria-clouds-of-sils-maria/#sthash.GXbW7bZ5.dpuf

Presented as part of the Bowdoin Francophone Film Festival, a part of the Tournees Festival, and made possible with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the US, the Centre National de la Cinematographie et de l'Image Animee, and the Franco-American Cultural Fund.

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Shelley Thorstensen Artist Talk: "Like a Radio"

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February 29, 20164:15 P.M. – 6:00 P.M.
Edwards Arts Center, Room 116 [Gallery]

Spring 2016 Marvin Bileck Printmaking Project Visiting Artist Shelley Thorstensen will explain why she describes her work to be "much like a radio, a result of the confluence of inner and outer stimuli: receiving and transmitting. The forms evolve, they turn and I rely on a sense for which I cannot find a proper name to hesitate the turning, to coalesce a given form." 

This event is sponsored by The Marvin Bileck and Emily Nelligan Trust and presented by the Department of Visual Art. 

Photo credits: Shelley Thorstensen, Etching, Lithograph, Relief, Chine colle, 34 x 22

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Gregory Shaya: "In the Face of Distant Suffering: Empathy, Modernity, and Mass Culture"

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February 29, 20167:30 P.M. – 9:00 P.M.
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

By many recent accounts, modernity is the story of the rise of empathy, in an entourage of emotions that includes sympathy, pity, and compassion. It is a view that accounts well for eighteenth-century readers of sentimental fiction and nineteenth-century reform movements. But what happened when the storied rise of empathy runs up against the communications revolution of the mid- to late- nineteenth century? How shall we understand the place of empathy in the age of mass media, when horrors and outrages from across the street and across the globe became front-page news? 

Drawing on intellectual history, nineteenth-century press history, visual culture, and literary sources from Emile Zola to Marcel Proust, Gregory Shaya underlines a set of complications in the emotional economy of empathy.

Shaya is associate professor of history and chair of program in international relations at the College of Wooster in Wooster, Ohio. His research centers on the cultural history of France in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, focusing on ideas of the mass public, early detective fiction, and the anti-detective tradition and public execution in France. He earned his PhD, master's and bachelor's degrees at the University of Michigan.

Sponsored by the Departments of Romance Languages and Literatures and History, and the Lindsay Fund for Guest Lecturers.

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Gallery Conversation - Lindsay Ceballos and Ellen Tani: "Evolving Approaches to Modernism in Visual Art"

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March 1, 201612:00 P.M. – 1:00 P.M.
Museum of Art, Pavilion

How do artists both honor and critique national histories? Professor Lindsay Ceballos, a scholar of early Russian Modernism with an emphasis on literature, and Ellen Tani, Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Curatorial Fellow, discuss two works of art now on view at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art that reflect evolving approaches to modernism in visual art: Komar & Melamid's Peace I: Life of Tolstoy (1986) and Alexej Charlamoff's Young Woman and Child (1894).

Presented by the Bowdoin College Museum of Art in conjunction with the exhibition To Count Art an Intimate Friend: Highlights from Bowdoin Collections, 1794 to the Present

Photo:  Installation view: To Count Art an Intimate Friend: Highlights from Bowdoin Collections, 1794 to the Present.







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Francophone Film Festival: 'Grigris'

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March 2, 20167:00 P.M. – 10:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Director Mahamat-Saleh Haroun, who was born in Chad in 1961 but has lived in France since 1982, has returned to his native country time and again to tell indelible stories played out against the near-constant civil war and economic hardship that have racked this former French colony for decades. 

His latest film blazingly opens at a disco in N'Djamena, the capital of Chad, where Souleymane (Souleymane Deme) - nicknamed "Grigris" - dazzles the crowd with his spectacular dance moves. His adoring fans don't seem to mind this lithe man's paralyzed leg, particularly Mimi (Anais Monory), a prostitute who recognizes a kindred soul in this exuberant but marginalized dancer. 
Grigris's physical disability has made him all but a pariah outside the world of nightclubs, relegated to only the most menial jobs. In an act of desperation, Grigris, who has vowed to pay his gravely ill stepfather's exorbitant hospital bill, joins an illegal gas-smuggling operation, setting off a chain of events that lead him to escape the city, with Mimi in tow, in fear for his life. Finding shelter in a rural village, these two outcasts are soon astonished to discover how far their hosts will go to protect them.

"An engaging tale of quiet desperation..." - Stephen Dalton, The Hollywood Reporter

DIRECTOR:Mahamat-Saleh Haroun
SCREENPLAY:Mahamat-Saleh Haroun
CAST:
Grigris: Souleymane Deme 
Mimi: Anais Monory

See more at: http://face-foundation.org/tournees-film-festival/bande-de-filles-girlhood/#sthash.2dX1wAbU.dpuf

Presented as part of the Bowdoin Francophone Film Festival, a part of the Tournees Festival, and made possible with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the US, the Centre National de la Cinematographie et de l'Image Animee, and the Franco-American Cultural Fund.

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Daniel Mennill: "Love Songs and Battle Cries: Cooperative and Competitive Acoustic Signals in Birds."

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March 3, 20164:00 P.M. – 5:00 P.M.
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Dan Mennill runs the Mennill Sound Analysis Laboratory - Canada's largest laboratory devoted to the study of animal sounds. His research explores the vocal behavior of temperate and tropical birds, including chickadees, wrens, sparrows, warblers, and woodpeckers. Together with his students, he has published more than 100 peer-reviewed research papers on topics that include male singing behavior, female mating behavior, and the behavioral differences between temperate and tropical birds. He has pioneered many new technologies for ecological research, including microphone arrays for spatial monitoring of wild animals, new technologies for sound playback to wild birds, and innovative techniques in radio telemetry.

Mennill is a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Windsor in Windsor, Ontario. He conducted his PhD research at Queen's University, and post-doctoral research in Cornell University's Laboratory of Ornithology and in Auburn University's Department of Biological Sciences. Mennill loves to teach students about ornithology and animal behavior. His hands-on, outdoor classes have earned him many teaching accolades, including the Alumni Award for Distinguished Contributions to Teaching, the University of Windsor's highest teaching honor. 

He lives with his wife and two children in LaSalle, Ontario.

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Francophone Film Festival: 'Things of the Aimless Wanderer' - Screening and Discussion with Rwandan director Kivu Ruhorahoza

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March 3, 20167:00 P.M. – 10:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Things of the Aimless Wanderer is a film about the sensitive topic of relations between "locals" and Westerners. A film about paranoia, mistrust and misunderstandings. Half a century after African independences, one would have imagined that relationships between African "intellectuals" and the West would be appeased by now. But more than ever before, tensions are rampant and mistrust is at its peak. In these times of easy access to the internet, those who consider themselves depository of African authenticity are alert to the Things of the Aimless Wanderer - the ways of the Westerner.

Kivu Ruhorahoza's arresting feature reveals a series of cryptic and loosely connected narrative shards. Each depicts an uneasy encounter between an African woman and a male figure of authority or menace, be he a nineteenth century white explorer, a twenty-first century Western journalist, or a Rwandan man performing reconnaissance for a shadowy internal agency. In each story, a female figure is an object of lust, surveillance, fascination or violence, inevitably disappearing from the narrative. One might ask whether the female avatar of these stories may be a metaphor for Rwanda itself: colonized, objectified, and struggling to calibrate cultural gains with reactionary policies and sentiments. Such questions haunt the periphery of this provocative film whose narrative core remains a reservoir of mystery.

Ruhorahoza is a screenwriter, director and producer from Rwanda. He wrote, produced, shot and directed the film, which had its world premiere at the Sundance Film Festival in 2015. He has taught directing and screenwriting workshops for various organizations including the Goethe Institut, Mira Nair's Maisha Film Lab, Almond Tree Films, Unicef and has served as a mentor for TriBeCa Film Institute for young underprivileged aspiring filmmakers from New York.

His first feature film, Grey Matter got a Jury Special Mention for Best Emerging Filmmaker and won the Best Actor award at the 2011 TriBeCa Film Festival. The film went on to win Grand Prize at the Tubingen French Film Festival, Best Director and Signis Award at the Cordoba African Film Festival, Jury Prize at the Khouribga African Film Festival, and several others. His work has been showcased at prestigious museums such as the MoMA in New York, the ICA in London, the Tate Modern (as part of Olafur Eliason's Little Sun project) and at universities including the Bayreuth University, King's College, University of British Columbia, University of Toronto, and University of Michigan.

This event is free and open to the public and is sponsored by the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, the Africana Studies and Cinema Studies Programs and the Lindsay Fund for Guest Lecturers.

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Francophone Film Festival: 'Parce que j'etais peintre' ('Because I was a Painter')

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March 4, 20167:00 P.M. – 10:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Christophe Cognet's absorbing documentary about artworks created by those imprisoned in concentration camps during World War II explores a number of paradoxes. Can a drawing of unimaginable horrors, for instance, ever be considered "beautiful"? What, exactly, is "beauty"?  The surviving artists, interviewed in in their homes in Israel, France, Poland, and other countries, express a range of opinions on these matters; one painter asserts that depicting his surroundings, no matter how gruesome, on paper was the only way to endure the torture. Others declare that sketching people, places, and events from the past was crucial to their survival. The testimony of these subjects is profoundly moving, never more so than when they offer a close critical analysis of the pieces they made during their incarceration. Cognet also meets with several museum curators and art historians who shed light on the trove of works left by those died in the camps - including the scores of portraits that Dinah Gottliebova, who was assigned to work with Josef Mengele, did of Roma detainees shortly before they were killed. Tackling two seemingly irreconcilable subjects - the atrocities of the Holocaust and the drive to create art - Because I Was a Painter provides a vital discussion of both.

"A meditation on suffering and beauty and how art can bridge the gap between the two." - The Hollywood Reporter

DIRECTOR: Christophe Cognet
SCREENPLAY: Christophe Cognet, Pierre Francois Moreau and Jean Breschand


See more at: http://face-foundation.org/tournees-film-festival/bande-de-filles-girlhood/#sthash.2dX1wAbU.dpuf

Presented as part of the Bowdoin Francophone Film Festival, a part of the Tournees Festival, and made possible with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the US, the Centre National de la Cinematographie et de l'Image Animee, and the Franco-American Cultural Fund.

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Francophone Film Festival: 'Le Chat et le Rabbin' ('The Rabbi's Cat')

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March 5, 201610:30 A.M. – 1:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Based on co-director Joann Sfar's popular comic-book series of the same name, The Rabbi's Cat features a remarkable, if hairless and giant-eared, feline at its center. This wryly philosophical, beautifully drawn, meticulously detailed animated film takes place during the 1920s and '30s in Algiers, where the kitty of the title is preparing for his bar mitzvah. Having previously devoured his master's parrot, the cat now has the power of speech, which he uses, as a devout soul should, to constantly question and probe his faith. Soon the cat and the rabbi set out for Ethiopia, encountering along the way a host of characters of various creeds and ethnicities. During their trek, the Jewish leader and his inquisitive pet will face a few treacherous situations. But their voyage ultimately, upliftingly results in interfaith harmony and a richer understanding of their own religious identity and history.

"The Rabbi's Cat remains intelligently entertaining by carrying an invaluable political message for our time of tensions. While starting off with characters marked by a strong Jewish identity, The Rabbi's Cat retraces the colonial route in light of the Enlightenment, clearly advocating exchange, openness, the discovery of the world and of the other. The cat, on behalf of Sfar, is at once Milou, Jiminy Cricket and Socrates." - Serge Kaganski, Les Inrockuptibles

DIRECTOR: Antoine Delesvaux, Joann Sfar
SCREENPLAY: Jean-Francois Laguionie, Anik Leray

- See more at: http://face-foundation.org/tournees-film-festival/le-chat-du-rabbin-the-rabbis-cat/#sthash.Dn3Ize63.dpuf

Presented as part of the Bowdoin Francophone Film Festival, a part of the Tournees Festival, and made possible with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the US, the Centre National de la Cinematographie et de l'Image Animee, and the Franco-American Cultural Fund.

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Francophone Film Festival: 'Le Chat et le Rabbin' ('The Rabbi's Cat')

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March 5, 20167:00 P.M. – 10:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Based on co-director Joann Sfar's popular comic-book series of the same name, The Rabbi's Cat features a remarkable, if hairless and giant-eared, feline at its center. This wryly philosophical, beautifully drawn, meticulously detailed animated film takes place during the 1920s and '30s in Algiers, where the kitty of the title is preparing for his bar mitzvah. Having previously devoured his master's parrot, the cat now has the power of speech, which he uses, as a devout soul should, to constantly question and probe his faith. Soon the cat and the rabbi set out for Ethiopia, encountering along the way a host of characters of various creeds and ethnicities. During their trek, the Jewish leader and his inquisitive pet will face a few treacherous situations. But their voyage ultimately, upliftingly results in interfaith harmony and a richer understanding of their own religious identity and history.

"The Rabbi's Cat remains intelligently entertaining by carrying an invaluable political message for our time of tensions. While starting off with characters marked by a strong Jewish identity, The Rabbi's Cat retraces the colonial route in light of the Enlightenment, clearly advocating exchange, openness, the discovery of the world and of the other. The cat, on behalf of Sfar, is at once Milou, Jiminy Cricket and Socrates." - Serge Kaganski, Les Inrockuptibles

DIRECTOR: Antoine Delesvaux, Joann Sfar
SCREENPLAY: Jean-Francois Laguionie, Anik Leray

- See more at: http://face-foundation.org/tournees-film-festival/le-chat-du-rabbin-the-rabbis-cat/#sthash.Dn3Ize63.dpuf

Presented as part of the Bowdoin Francophone Film Festival, a part of the Tournees Festival, and made possible with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the US, the Centre National de la Cinematographie et de l'Image Animee, and the Franco-American Cultural Fund.

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Cassidy Lecturer Scott Allen '83: "From Watergate to 'Spotlight': The Role of Investigative Journalism in Democracy"

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March 8, 20167:30 P.M. – 9:00 P.M.
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Scott Allen is the current editor of The Spotlight Team at The Boston Globe, an investigative reporting team that exposed the sexual abuse scandal in the Catholic Church in 2001, as portrayed in the recent Academy Award-nominated film, Spotlight. Allen helped lead the Globe's coverage of the Boston Marathon bombings and ensuing manhunt, coverage that earned a 2014 Pulitzer Prize. He previously served as the Globe's health and science editor and as the newspaper's lead environmental writer. He also has written extensively on government corruption, resulting in numerous criminal convictions.

A member of the Bowdoin Class of 1983 and a journalist for thirty two years, he has taught science journalism to graduate students at Boston University and served as a Knight Science Journalism Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Sponsored by the Tom Cassidy Lecture Fund.

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Sharon Swartz: "Bats Aren't Birds or Bugs: Skin, Stretching, Sensing, Spindles, Spinning in Evolution's Youngest Flapping Flyers"

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March 10, 20164:00 P.M. – 5:00 P.M.
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 020

Dr. Sharon Swartz is a Professor in the department of ecology and evolutionary biology and the School of Engineering at Brown University. In her lecture, she will explore how the evolutionary origin of bat wings from mammalian hands has influenced the biomechanics of flight in this fascinating group of animals.


She will discuss the nature of wing skin as a biomaterial, and how its mechanical properties may be actively modulated during flight by a unique group of muscles found only in bats, and speculate on how selection for reduced weight may interact with aspects of neural control in the most morphologically complex of animal wings. Professor Swartz will show that we can gain insight into the functional architecture of bat wings not only with sophisticated bioengineering approaches such as particle image velocimetry, multi-camera high speed videography, and dynamic modeling, but also low-tech methods including polarized light photography, basic histology, dissection.

Professor Swartz received her undergraduate training at Oberlin College, with a double major in biology and sociology/anthropology, and her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago.

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