News

Academic Life
Outsmarting Baboons and Dodging Pelicans, Adam Eichenwald ’14 Studies Raptors in Kenya

A day in the life for Adam Eichenwald ’14 this summer sometimes included a laundry raid by a troop of baboons, a sighting of giraffes out the kitchen window, and a near-miss collision with low-flying pelicans.

Read more »


Student Life
A Night Mingling With Art

In what has become a fall tradition, Student Activities last Friday threw its annual evening soiree at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art and invited the entire student body.

Read more »


Featured video

  • Another Year Begins at Bowdoin

    Another Year Begins at Bowdoin
  • A Cappella Groups Sing For New Members

    A Cappella Groups Sing For New Members
  • Welcome Class of 2018 Parents

    Welcome Class of 2018 Parents
  • Before and After: 52 Harpswell

    Before and After: 52 Harpswell
  • We Asked Professors…

    We Asked Professors…
  • Bowdoin Opens the Academic Year with 213...

    Bowdoin Opens the Academic Year with 213th Convocation
  • A Bowdoin Tradition: A Presidential Welc...

    A Bowdoin Tradition: A Presidential Welcome on the Museum Steps

Recent Headlines

Featured Events

Laura McClure: "Women and Theater in Classical Athens"

Laura McClure: "Women and Theater in Classical Athens"

October 1, 2014 7:30 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Laura McClure is Jane Ellen Harrison Professor of Classics at the University of Wisconsin.  Professor McClure received her Ph.D. in Classical Languages and Literatures from the University of Chicago in 1991. Her research interests include Athenian drama, the study of women in the ancient world, and classical reception. Her books focus on representations of women in Athenian drama: Spoken Like a Woman: Speech and Gender in Athenian Drama (Princeton, 1999) and Courtesans at Table: Gender and Greek Literary Culture in Athenaeus (Routledge 2003). She has edited three volumes on the subject of women in antiquity, including Making Silence Speak: Women's Voices in Greek Literature and Society, with Andre Lardinois (Princeton, 2001), Prostitutes and Courtesans in the Ancient World, with C. A. Faraone (Wisconsin, 2006), and Sexuality and Gender in the Classical World (Blackwell, 2008). She has published numerous articles, most recently an analysis of the role of women in tragic recognition scenes. She is currently completing a textbook about women in ancient Greece and Rome (under contract with Blackwell). While on research leave in 2014-15, she plans to work on a new project on women and memory in Greek tragedy. She regularly teaches advanced Greek language courses, Women and Gender in the Classical World, Civilization of Ancient Greece, and Ancient Drama in translation.


Sponsored by the Mellon Humanities Initiative--Studies in the Mediterranean, the Jasper Jacob Stahl Lectureship Fund, and the Department of Classics.

View Details

The Mima Mounds Mystery- Solved?

The Mima Mounds Mystery- Solved?

October 2, 2014 4:00 PM  – 5:30 PM
Druckenmiller Hall, Room 016

Professor Emmanuel "Manny" Gabet, a geomorphologist at San Jose State University in California, says prehistoric generations of pocket gophers created the vast fields of Mima mounds found in south Puget Sound, Eastern Washington and in other locations around the world. Local geologists and wildlife researchers aren't so sure.

See the webpage for more about this event.

View Details

Lecture: "Richard Tuttle: The Theater of Attention"

Lecture: "Richard Tuttle: The Theater of Attention"

October 2, 2014 4:30 PM  – 5:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Susan Tallman discusses Richard Tuttle's contribution to the field of contemporary printmaking.  Tallman is the author of The Contemporary Print: From Pre-Pop to Postmodern (1996) and wrote an essay for the exhibition catalog.  She is a member of the faculty of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. 

RSVPs are kindly requested, but not required.
You may RSVP here: https://thetheaterofattention.eventbrite.com
or contact Christine Piontek at artmuseumevents@bowdoin.edu.

Note: This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin’s Live Webcasts page
.

Presented in conjunction with Richard Tuttle: A Print Retrospective.

Free and open to the public.

View Details

Bowdoin Friends Book Lecture Series (Film): Richard III (1995)

Bowdoin Friends Book Lecture Series (Film): Richard III (1995)

October 2, 2014 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Richard III (1995), directed by Richard Loncraine, presented by Aaron Kitch, associate professor and chair of the English department. The film is being presented in conjunction with his talk on October 9, "Looking for Richard: The Many Faces of Shakespeare's Stage Villain." For more information about this, refer to the second issue of the Bowdoin Bulletin or call 207-725-3253.

View Details

Damnationland: Six Short Horror Films by Maine Filmmakers

Damnationland: Six Short Horror Films by Maine Filmmakers

October 2, 2014 7:00 PM  – 10:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

Damnationland, now in its fifth year, presents genre-defying original works from Maine filmmakers that redefine the classic thriller and horror categories.

Especially for the Halloween season, this Damnationland retrospective program will feature six short films produced in Maine by Mainers from 2010 through 2013.

These are dark, surreal, and fantastic pieces, and they offer film fans an excellent sampling of the talent producing independent film in Maine today.

Syrup (2013)
What begins as a quaint morning in New England becomes a nightmare over breakfast.
Through The Door Productions
Directed by Caroline O'Connor and Everett Bunker

Penelope: Once Upon A Time In The Woods (2013)
A dark fairy tale set in the Maine woods, where evil twists the imagination of a young girl as her older sister gets pulled to the horrors that lurk within.
Moving Circle Pictures
Directed by Jennifer Widor Smith

Last Call (2010)
The story of an ordinary man who has an epiphany and believes he must perform last rites on zombies because they still have souls. Zombie mayhem in Southern Maine.
Directed by Christian and Sarah Matzke.

Merrow (2012)
A study in the calm terror of the inevitable, "Merrow" tells an otherwordly love story between a man and his mistress of the sea. As their intense relationship winds towards its tragic end, the couple becomes more entwined in a macabre dance of strength, support, and codependence.
Written and directed by Allen Baldwin

Raid of the Vomit-Blood Fiends (2012)
All is well when a husband and wife discuss politics over a candlelit dinner. That is, until the butler misplaces the wine.
Written and directed by R.J. Wilson

Are You The Walkers? (2011) - . This film continues in the spirit of the traditional supernatural folktale. Two men seek to deter a creeping divergence in their friendship by retreating deep into the Maine woods for the weekend. Caught in a sudden and severe blizzard, their relationship unravels as they are visited by a voice that calls to them from the storm. Directed by Derek Kimball

To see more: www.damnationland.com


View Details

Dynamical Models of Locomotion

Dynamical Models of Locomotion

October 3, 2014 12:30 PM  – 1:30 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

Dynamical systems theory uses normal forms as simple models for empirical observations. This lecture focuses upon stable limit cycles as models of animal locomotion. Utilizing motion capture data of running cockroaches and people and flying fruit flies and mosquitoes, we test the anchors and templates hypotheses formulated by Full and collaborators. These hypotheses propose that animals have evolved so that their motion resembles a low dimensional dynamical system, and that control is based upon a small number of quantities. This lecture will introduce these hypotheses and reformulate them as a statement about the motion of a dynamical system near a periodic orbit. It will then describe the strategy we developed to analyze motion capture data from this perspective. We end with new questions about stochastic perturbations and data driven models of dynamical systems.

John Guckenheimer, Abram R. Bullis Professor in Mathematics, Cornell University, will present the Dan E. Christie Mathematics Lecture. Lecture is sponsored by the Mathematics Department and Digital and Computational Studies.

John Guckenheimer started his career in pure mathematics, and is now one of the leaders of applied dynamical systems. Last year, he and co-author Phil Holmes were awarded the AMS Leroy P. Steele Prize for Mathematical Exposition for their 1983 book, Nonlinear Oscillations, Dynamical Systems, and Bifurcations of Vector Fields (Springer-Verlag). John is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for Advancement of Science, the American Mathematical Society, and the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, where he served as president in 1997-98. His research encompasses mathematical biology, systems with multiple time scales, and computational algorithms.

This lecture integrates mathematics, biology, and digital and computational ways of thinking.

View Details

Ryan Cordell Lecture "Viral Texts and the Technologies of Authorship"

Ryan Cordell Lecture "Viral Texts and the Technologies of Authorship"

October 6, 2014 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Ryan Cordell will draw on the Viral Texts project at Northeastern University (http://www.viraltexts.org) to demonstrate how computational methods such as text mining, mapping, and network analysis can illuminate nineteenth-century systems of circulation, reprinting, and remediation systemically and at scale. Dr. Cordell’s project focuses on the viral culture that enlivened nineteenth-century periodical production, distribution, and consumption. Though the term “viral culture” is new, many of the practices it describes—especially the sharing, remixing, and repurposing of cultural materials—emerged long before the twenty-first century.

Ryan Cordell is Assistant Professor of English at Northeastern University and Core Founding Faculty Member in the NULab for Texts, Maps, and Networks. His scholarship focuses on convergences among literary, periodical, and religious culture in antebellum American mass media.

This lecture is underwritten by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

View Details

China in Africa: Think Again

China in Africa: Think Again

October 6, 2014 7:30 PM  – 9:30 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Deborah Brautigam is Professor of Comparative Politics and Director of the International Development Program (IDEV), and the China Africa Research Initiative (CARI) at Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in Washington, DC. A leading expert on China in Africa, Professor Brautigam is the author of The Dragon's Gift: The Real Story of China in Africa (Oxford University Press, 2010; Chinese version published by Chinese Academy of Social Sciences Press) and Chinese Aid and African Development : Exporting Green Revolution (St. Martin's Press, 1998). She is also co-editor of Taxation and State-Building: Capacity and Consent (Cambridge University Press, 2008) as well as numerous articles published in academic journals and public affairs media. Professor Brautigam regularly advises international agencies and governments on China-Africa economic engagement, and is currently writing a book on China, Africa and global food security, focusing on the "land grab" issue.

View Details

Tudor Silva: "The Rise and Impact of the Bodu Bala Sena"

Tudor Silva: "The Rise and Impact of the Bodu Bala Sena"

October 7, 2014 6:30 PM  – 9:30 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

Eminent Sri Lankan sociologist, Professor Tudor Silva, senior professor from the Department of Sociology, University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka, will give a lecture entitled, "The Rise and Impact of the Bodu Bala Sena."  Professor Tudor examines how the BBS, a radical Buddhist extremist group, has emerged as a major political force in contemporary Sri Lanka bringing about tensions and antagonisms with Sri Lanka's minority Muslim community.

View Details

Gallery Conversations: "Drawing a Line from Tuttle to Goltzius"

Gallery Conversations: "Drawing a Line from Tuttle to Goltzius"

October 8, 2014 12:00 PM  – 1:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

The prints of Hendrick Goltzius and Richard Tuttle will come to life in a gallery talk led by Carrie Scanga, Assistant Professor of Art, and Joachim Homann, Curator at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art. Presented in conjunction with the exhibitions, Hendrick Goltzius: Mythology and Truth and Richard Tuttle: A Print Retrospective.

Free and open to the public.

Photo: Pygmalion and Galatea, 1593, engraving by Hendrick Goltzius.




View Details

Alonzo Plough: "Building Together a Culture of Health"

Alonzo Plough: "Building Together a Culture of Health"

October 8, 2014 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Alonzo L. Plough, Vice President, Research-Evaluation-Learning and Chief Science Officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, will discuss the Foundation's new vision for working together to create a culture of health so that everyone in our diverse nation can lead healthy lives now and in future generations. Before joining RWJF, Plough was director of emergency preparedness and response at the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, where he served from 2009-2013. He also served as vice president of strategy, planning and evaluation for the California Endowment from 2005-2009; and as the director and health officer for the Seattle and King County Department of Public Health, and profesoor of health services at the University of Washington School of Public Health in Seattle. Plough earned his PhD and MA at Cornell University and his MPH at Yale University School of Medicine's Department of Epidemiology and Public Health. He did his undergraduate work at St. Olaf College, where he earned a BA. Dr. Plough's visit to Bowdoin is sponsored by the Office of the President and the Department of Sociology and Anthropology.

View Details

Pop-Up Museum: Wish You Were Here! Travel Souvenirs

Pop-Up Museum: Wish You Were Here! Travel Souvenirs

October 8, 2014 6:30 PM  – 8:30 PM
David Saul Smith Union, Morrell Lounge

A Pop-Up Museum is a temporary exhibit created by the people who show up at a venue to display their objects and share information about them.  It lasts a few hours and then is gone!

Do you have a favorite kind of object you collect when traveling?  Bring it to Smith Union the evening of October 8th.  Bowdoin College students and staff from Bowdoin's two museums and library will help you exhibit your treasure and share a story about it.  Or just come and see what others have brought!

*Bring an item that you can easily display on
  a table.
*Please, no live animals or plants.
*No weapons or objects that look like
  weapons.
*Nothing that requires an external source of
  power.

Sponsored by the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum, Bowdoin College Museum of Art, and Bowdoin College Library.




View Details

Bowdoin Friends Book Lecture Series

Bowdoin Friends Book Lecture Series

October 9, 2014 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

The Association of Bowdoin Friends is pleased to continue this program. All members of the community are invited to read a good book and hear an excellent Bowdoin College professor lecture about it. There will be opportunity for questions. The event is free and open to the public. Just come, listen, and learn.


Associate Professor and Chair of the English Department Aaron Kitch will present:

"Looking for Richard: The Many Faces of Shakespear's Stage Villain"
Shakespeare's play, Tragedy of Richard III


How did Richard III, whose notorious defeat by the Earl of Richmond at the Battle of Bosworth in 1485 initiated the Tudor dynasty, become a dramatic symbol of evil in Shakespeare's day and our own? Why, moreover, have so many readers and viewers found Shakespeare's stage villain strangely likeable over the centuries? To address these fundamental questions, Professor Kitch will situate Shakespeare's Tragedy of Richard III in the context of Elizabethan ideologies of power and in relation to contemporary politics of representation as found in cinematic productions starring Laurence Olivier, Ian McKellen, and Al Pacino. Reading Richard as an enduring icon of evil also allows us to find some of Shakespeare's central methods for creating plot and character through complex irony.

Aaron Kitch teaches courses on early modern drama and culture, including "Shakespeare's Afterlives" and "Shakespeare in Theory." He is the author of Political Economy and the States of Literature in Early Modern England, as well as multiple essays on Renaissance literature and culture.




View Details

Gallery Conversations: "Metamorphosis of a Myth"

Gallery Conversations: "Metamorphosis of a Myth"

October 16, 2014 4:00 PM  – 5:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Linda Roth, '76, P '13, Charles C. and Eleanor Lamont Cunningham Curator of European Decorative Arts at the Wadsworth Atheneum and James Higginbotham, Associate Professor of Classics on the Henry Johnson Professorship Fund and Classics Associate Curator for the Ancient Collection in the Museum of Art, explore the making and use of tapestries as well as the long history and central themes associated with the myth of Cupid and Psyche. The discussion will examine the making and use of tapestries and representations of this tale over time. Presented in conjunction with Weaving the Myth of Pysche: Baroque Tapestries from the Wadsworth Atheneum.

Free and open to the public.

Illustration: Psyche at the Temple at Ceres (detail), ca. 1660.  Wool, silk, and gold thread.  Courtesy of the Wadsworth Atheneum.

View Details

Byrd and I: A Northern Evening with Rev. Robert Bryan

Byrd and I: A Northern Evening with Rev. Robert Bryan

October 16, 2014 7:00 PM  – 8:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Rev. Robert Bryan, best known for his "Bert & I" stories, will entertain with tales about his career in Labrador and Quebec and his friendship with polar explorer Richard Byrd.  Rev. Bryan's talk marks the publication of his autobiography by Down East Books, and the donation to the Arctic Museum of a parka made from sealskins given to him by Byrd.

A book signing of Bryan's new memoir, "The Flying Parson and the Real Story Behind Bert and I," will take place after the talk.


View Details

Is War Between The Great Powers Still Possible?

Is War Between The Great Powers Still Possible?

October 20, 2014 7:30 PM  – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Christopher Coker is Professor of International Relations at the London School of Economics. He was a NATO Fellow in 1981, and served two terms on the Council of the Royal United Services Institute. He is a serving member of the Washington Strategy Seminar; the Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis (Cambridge, Mass); the Black Sea University Foundation; the Moscow School of Politics and the IDEAS Advisory Board. He is a member of the Academic Board of the Czech Diplomatic Academy. He was a Visiting Fellow of Goodenough College in 2003-4. He is a member of the Executive Council for the Belgrade University International Summer School for Democracy and also President of the Centre for Media and Communications of a Democratic Romania. He is a former editor of The Atlantic Quarterly and The European Security Analyst. He has advised several Conservative Party think tanks including the Institute for European Defence and Strategic Studies and the Centre for Policy Studies and helped to draw up the Party's defence platform in the 1996 European Parliamentary Elections. He has written for The Wall Street Journal; The Wall St Journal (Europe); The Times; The Independent; The European, The Spectator, The Times Literary Supplement and The Literary Review. He is a regular lecturer at the Royal College of Defence Studies (London); the NATO Defence College (Rome), the Centre for International Security (Geneva) and the National Institute for Defence Studies (Tokyo) He has spoken at other military institutes in Western Europe, North America, Australia and South-east Asia.

View Details

Brett Rogers: Tyrannical Teachers and Student-Citizens

Brett Rogers: Tyrannical Teachers and Student-Citizens

October 21, 2014 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Professor Brett Rogers, University of Puget Sound, WA, will be joining the many conversations and debates we are having about the "usefulness" of a liberal arts education with his public lecture, "Tyrannical Teachers and Student-Citizens: Classical Greek Perspectives on Freedom and the Liberal Arts."  Support for this event provided by the Jasper Jacob Stahl Lectureship Fund.

View Details

"Pieter Coecke van Aelst and the Art of Designing Tapestries in Early Modern Europe"

"Pieter Coecke van Aelst and the Art of Designing Tapestries in Early Modern Europe"

October 22, 2014 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Elizabeth Cleland is the curator of the Metropolitan Museum's upcoming exhibition Grand Design: Pieter Coecke van Aelst and Renaissance Tapestry. Cleland speaks about this major figure of the Northern Renaissance who designed tapestries for the royal courts of Europe. The tapestries on view at the Museum are based on drawings by this Flemish master. Presented in conjunction with Weaving the Myth of Psyche: Tapestries from the Wadsworth Atheneum.

RSVPs are kindly requested, but not required.  You may RSVP here: http://thepsychetapestries.eventbrite.com or contact Christine Piontek at artmuseumevents@bowdoin.edu.

Free and open to the public.

Photo:  Elizabeth Cleland

View Details

Helena Goscilo, "Seeing Red: Soviet Women in Graphic Form"

Helena Goscilo, "Seeing Red: Soviet Women in Graphic Form"

October 23, 2014 7:00 PM  – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

The Soviet poster, which addressed the broad masses, was a genre ideally suited to the state's imperative of molding Soviet identity and everyday values while propagating the political ideology that fueled them. Goscilo examines the genre's convergence with official dicta in its assignment of gender roles, focusing primarily on the Soviet era. She takes into account the relationship between women's functions and achievements as urged or claimed by posters, on the one hand, and their everyday reality, on the other.

View Details

The Alfred E Golz Memorial Lecture: "Democracy at the Roots: Understanding Haiti's Political Culture"

The Alfred E Golz Memorial Lecture: "Democracy at the Roots: Understanding Haiti's Political Culture"

October 23, 2014 7:30 PM  – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Laurent Dubois is the Marcello Lotti Professor of Romance Studies and History at Duke University. He is the author of several books on the history and culture of the French Caribbean and Atlantic World, including Avengers of the New World: The Story of the Haitian Revolution (2004), A Colony of Citizens: Revolution and Slave Emancipation in the French Caribbean, 1787-1804 (2004), and his latest work, Haiti: The Aftershocks of History (2012). He also has an interest in the relationship between sports and politics. In 2010 he published Soccer Empire: The World Cup and the Future of France. He is currently preparing a book manuscript on the history of the banjo, for which he has received several awards, including a Mellon New Directions Fellowship, and fellowships from the National Humanities Center and the Guggenheim Foundation. Professor Dubois also served as head historical consultant for a PBS documentary on the Haitian Revolution, which premiered in 2009. Professor Dubois’s upcoming Golz lecture, "Democracy at the Roots: Understanding Haiti's Political Culture," explores three intertwined legacies of the Haitian Revolution on political thought and practice in the country: the largely hostile reaction to it outside the country, the formation of new political institutions and structures, and -- most importantly -- the creation of a new set of cultural, social, and economic structures that Jean Casimir has called the “counter-plantation” system. He identifies both the main currents and critical counter-currents within each of these legacies, calling attention to the aspects of the latter legacies that seem to him to be the most valuable and worth comprehending and nourishing in constructing new Haitian futures.

View Details

Exploring with Drosophila: Lessons Learned on a Journey through the Fly Genome

Exploring with Drosophila:  Lessons Learned on a Journey through the Fly Genome

October 24, 2014 12:30 PM  – 3:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

The years since 1953 have been an exciting time, as genetics has embraced first molecular biology and then genomics approaches. In this talk I will reflect on my own journey, and the broader lessons learned from a career studying chromatin structure and epigenetic mechanisms. During this time the puzzle posed by our very large eukaryotic genomes has been resolved by the recognition that our genomes are largely made up of transposable elements (TEs) and their remnants, bits of DNA derived from invading viruses and the like. Thus packaging up the DNA, which is done by generating a protein-DNA complex called chromatin, is necessary not only to fit all of the DNA into the nucleus, but also to maintain most of the genome in a silent state. Our work in flies identified one of the key proteins used in silencing, Heterochromatin Protein 1 (HP1), which is conserved from yeast to humans. Chromatin-based regulatory mechanisms now referred to as "epigenetics" are dependent on the underlying DNA organization, including the distribution of those TEs. Our good ideas that have helped to resolve this puzzle have always come from putting together inputs from multiple sources. Good communication, both among scientists and with the larger community, is essential for our continuing efforts to understand how life works.

Kresge Audiorium 12:30 p.m. followed by Student Presentations.  The Student Summer Poster Presentations: 3:00 - 5:00 Morrell Gymnasium.

View Details

Prof. Sherry Roush, "Haunting Authors, Haunting Us: Writing What the Dead Speak"

Prof. Sherry Roush, "Haunting Authors, Haunting Us: Writing What the Dead Speak"

October 27, 2014 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

Sherry Roush is associate professor of Italian at Penn State University.  She is author of Hermes' Lyre: Italian Poetic Self-Commentary from Dante to Tommaso Campanella (2002), co-editor of The Medieval Marriage Scene: Prudence, Passion and Policy (2005) and editor and translator of Campanella's Selected Philosophical Poems (2011). Her talk presents parts from her current book project investigating the rhetorical power harnessed by Renaissance authors who feign "speaking" with the spirits of the dead in ghost stories, dream visions, and journeys to the afterlife.  The book is forthcoming from the University of Toronto Press under the title Speaking Spirits: Ventriloquizing the Dead in Renaissance Italy.

This event, free and open to the public, is sponsored by the Departments of Romance Languages and English and by the Lectures and Concerts General Fund.

View Details

Gallery Conversations: "Anatomy of a Renaissance Painting"

Gallery Conversations: "Anatomy of a Renaissance Painting"

October 28, 2014 12:00 PM  – 1:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Nina Roth-Wells, '91, an independent painting conservator, and Andrea Rosen, Curatorial Assistant at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, discuss the creation and restoration of the 15th century Italian tempera on panel paintings in the Museum's installation of Renaissance art, Lovers and Saints: Art of the Italian Renaissance.

Free and open to the public.

Illustration: The Crucifixion (detail), ca. 1370 by Barnaba Modena.

View Details

Threatened and Endangered: Flora and Fauna of Maine: Artist's Books by Rebecca Goodale

Threatened and Endangered: Flora and Fauna of Maine: Artist's Books by Rebecca Goodale

October 28, 2014 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Book artist Rebecca Goodale will present an illustrated talk about her multi-year project to create artist's books documenting all of the plants and animals on Maine's "Threatened and Endangered Species" lists.
The talk is presented in conjunction with an exhibition of Goodale's work, on display in Hawthorne-Longfellow Library, and a related library exhibition, "Envisioning Extinctions," curated by Prof. Susan Wegner (Art History). A reception in the library will follow the talk.

This lecture is sponsored by the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund, the Association of Bowdoin Friends, and the Bowdoin College Library.

View Details

Film & Conversation: Peter Greenaway's "Goltzius and the Pelican Company"

Film & Conversation: Peter Greenaway's "Goltzius and the Pelican Company"

November 4, 2014 7:00 PM  – 10:00 PM
Searles Science Building, Room 315

In Peter Greenaway's imaginative portrait of the mannerist print maker, Hendrick Goltzius appears as an artist who stages his seductive Old Testament images to finance work with new printing technologies. The screening will be followed by a conversation with English professors Aviva Briefel and Aaron Kitch, and curator, Joachim Homann.  Presented in conjunction with the exhibition, Hendrick Goltzius: Mythology and Truth.

RSVPs are kindly requested, but not required.  You may RSVP here: https://goltziuspelicancompany.eventbrite.com
or email Christine Piontek at artmuseumevents@bowdoin.edu.

Free and open to the public.

Photo:  Film Still from Goltzius and the Pelican Company.

View Details

The Warburg Institute Presidents 'British Art in the Mediterranean' (1941): Michael Berkowitz Lecture

The Warburg Institute Presidents 'British Art in the Mediterranean' (1941): Michael Berkowitz Lecture

November 5, 2014 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

"The Warburg Institute presents 'British Art in the Mediterranean' (1941)"   with Michael Berkowitz on Wednesday, November 5th at 7:00 pm in the Beam Classroom of the Visual Arts Center at Bowdoin College.

The Warburg “relocated” from Hamburg to London in 1933.  Professor Berkowitz’s current research focuses on the practice of photography at the Warburg Institute, and their efforts to bring “Western Civilization” to a broad popular audience--through photographic exhibitions. His talk will focus on German Jewish refugees and how they approached western civilization  in a totally different way from the Nazis.

Professor Berkowitz received his PhD in European cultural history under George L. Mosse (University of Wisconsin). He is Professor of modern Jewish history in the Department of Hebrew & Jewish Studies, University College London. He has two forthcoming works - Jews and Photography in Britain: Connections and Developments, 1850-2007 and The Jewish Engagement with Photography, co-edited with Martin Deppner.

Sponsored by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Departments of History, German, and Art History, and the Mellon Humanities Intitiative- Studies in the Mediterranean.

View Details

Lecture: "The Art and Life of Marcel Duchamp: A Collision of the Personal and Professional"

Lecture: "The Art and Life of Marcel Duchamp: A Collision of the Personal and Professional"

November 6, 2014 4:30 PM  – 5:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Francis Naumann will address Marcel Duchamp's ties to the many artists in his family, including his brothers Jacques Villon and Raymond Villon-Duchamp, his sister Suzanne Duchamp, and her husband, Jean Crotti. Naumanna's numerous publications include, most recently, The Duchamp Family of Artists (2014).

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition, Collaborations and Collusions: Artistsa Networks from the Nineteenth Century to the Present.

RSVPs are kindly requested, but not required. You may RSVP here: http://artandlifeofduchamp.eventbrite.com or contact Christine Piontek at artmuseumevents@bowdoin.edu.

Free and open to the public.

Photo: Francis Naumann

View Details

Reception at the Museum of Art with Francis Naumann

Reception at the Museum of Art with Francis Naumann

November 6, 2014 5:30 PM  – 6:30 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Enjoy refreshments, conversation, and a chance to see the work of Marcel Duchamp and family after the lecture by Francis Naumann.

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Collaboration and Collusions: Artists' Networks from the Nineteenth Century to the Present.

Illustration:  Marcel Duchamp and Katherine Dreier (detail), 1936.

View Details

Brodie Family Lecture: "Race, Income, and the Reduction of Inequality in American Education."

Brodie Family Lecture: "Race, Income, and the Reduction of Inequality in American Education."

November 6, 2014 7:00 PM  – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Sean Reardon delivers this year's Brodie Family Lecture address entitled, "Race, Income, and the Reduction of Inequality in American Education."

Dr. Reardon is the endowed Professor of Poverty and Inequality in Education and is Professor (by courtesy) of Sociology at Stanford University.  He is the recipient of a William T. Grant Foundation Scholar Award, a Carnegie Scholar Award, and a National Academy of Education Postdoctoral Fellowship.

This event is free, and open to the public.

View Details



More News


Bowdoin on Social Media »

facebook twitter instagram vimeo google plus pinterest