Location: Bowdoin / Theater and Dance / Courses / Fall 2011

Theater and Dance

Fall 2011

Dance

102. Making Dances
Paul Sarvis M 9:30 - 11:25, W 9:30 - 11:25
Explores ways of choreographing dances and multimedia performance works, primarily solos, duets, trios. A strong video component introduces students—regardless of previous experience in dance—to a wide range of compositional methods that correspond to creative process in other arts: writing, drawing, composing. Includes some reading, writing, and discussion, as well as work with visiting professional dance companies and attendance at live performances.

102. Making Dances
Charlotte Griffin M 11:30 - 1:25, W 11:30 - 1:25
Explores ways of choreographing dances and multimedia performance works, primarily solos, duets, trios. A strong video component introduces students—regardless of previous experience in dance—to a wide range of compositional methods that correspond to creative process in other arts: writing, drawing, composing. Includes some reading, writing, and discussion, as well as work with visiting professional dance companies and attendance at live performances.

104. Stagecraft
Michael Schiff-Verre T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
Introduction to the language, theory, and practice of technical theater. Hands-on experience in lighting, scenic and property construction, costuming, and stage management. Considers the possibilities, demands, and limits inherent in different forms of performance and performance spaces, and explores the job roles integral to theater and dance production. Includes forty hours of laboratory work. Grading is Credit/D/Fail.

111. Modern I: Technique
Paul Sarvis T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
Classes in modern dance technique include basic exercises to develop dance skills such as balance and musicality. More challenging movement combinations and longer dance sequences build on these exercises. While focusing on the craft of dancing, students develop an appreciation of their own styles and an understanding of the role of craft in the creative process. During the semester, a historical overview of twentieth-century American dance on video is presented. Attendance at all classes is required. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.

112. Modern I: Repertory and Performance
Paul Sarvis T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
Repertory students are required to take Dance 111 concurrently. Repertory classes provide the chance to learn faculty-choreographed works or reconstructions of historical dances. Class meetings are conducted as rehearsals for performances at the end of the semester: the December Studio Show, the annual Spring Performance in Pickard Theater, or Museum Pieces at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art in May. Additional rehearsals are scheduled before performances. Attendance at all classes and rehearsals is required. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.

130. Principles of Design
Judy Gailen M 9:30 - 11:25, W 9:30 - 11:25
An introduction to theatrical design that stimulates students to consider the world of a play, dance, or performance piece from a designer’s perspective. Through projects, readings, discussion, and critiques, students explore the fundamental principles of visual design, as they apply to set, lighting, and costume design, as well as text analysis for the designer, and the process of collaboration. Strong emphasis on perceptual, analytical, and communication skills.

211. Modern II: Technique
Nyama McCarthy-Brown M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25
A continuation of the processes introduced in Dance 111. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.

212. Modern II: Repertory and Performance
Nyama McCarthy-Brown M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55
Intermediate repertory students are required to take Dance 211 concurrently. A continuation of the principles and practices introduced in Dance 112. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.

221. Ballet II: Technique
Charlotte Griffin T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
A continuation of the processes introduced in Dance 121. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.

222. Ballet II: Repertory and Performance
Charlotte Griffin T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
Repertory students are required to take Dance 221 concurrently. Repertory classes are an opportunity to learn and perform new choreography or historical reconstructions created by faculty or guests. Class meetings are conducted as rehearsals. Additional rehearsals may be required. Attendance at all classes, studio and stage rehearsals, and performances is required. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.

311. Modern III: Technique
Daphne McCoy T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
A continuation of the processes introduced in Dance 211. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.

312. Modern III: Repertory and Performance
Daphne McCoy T 4:00 - 5:25, TH 4:00 - 5:25
Intermediate/advanced repertory students are required to take Dance 311 concurrently. A continuation of the principles and practices introduced in Dance 212. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.

Theater

104. Stagecraft
Michael Schiff-Verre T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
Introduction to the language, theory, and practice of technical theater. Hands-on experience in lighting, scenic and property construction, costuming, and stage management. Considers the possibilities, demands, and limits inherent in different forms of performance and performance spaces, and explores the job roles integral to theater and dance production. Includes forty hours of laboratory work. Grading is Credit/D/Fail.

120. Acting I
Abigail Killeen M 1:30 - 3:25, W 1:30 - 3:25
Introduces students to the physical, emotional, and intellectual challenge of the acting process. Voice and movement work, analysis of dramatic texts from an actor's point of view, and improvisational exercises are used to provide students with a variety of methods for acting truthfully on stage.

120. Acting I
Roger Bechtel T 1:30 - 3:25, TH 1:30 - 3:25
Introduces students to the physical, emotional, and intellectual challenge of the acting process. Voice and movement work, analysis of dramatic texts from an actor's point of view, and improvisational exercises are used to provide students with a variety of methods for acting truthfully on stage.

130. Principles of Design
Judy Gailen M 9:30 - 11:25, W 9:30 - 11:25
An introduction to theatrical design that stimulates students to consider the world of a play, dance, or performance piece from a designer's perspective. Through projects, readings, discussion, and critiques, students explore the fundamental principles of visual design, as they apply to set, lighting, and costume design, as well as text analysis for the designer, and the process of collaboration. Strong emphasis on perceptual, analytical, and communication skills.

150. Improvisation
Davis Robinson M 9:30 - 11:25, W 9:30 - 11:25
Improvisation is a fundamental tool used by dancers, musicians, actors, writers, and other artists to explore the language of a medium and to develop new work. An interdisciplinary introduction to some of the primary forms of improvisation used in dance and theater. Content includes theater games, narrative exercises, contact improvisation, and choreographic structures.

195. Production and Performance
Roger Bechtel
Engagement in the presentation of a full-length work for public performance with a faculty director or choreographer. Areas of concentration within the production may include design, including set, light, sound, or costume; rehearsal and performance of roles; service as assistant director or stage manager. In addition to fulfilling specific production responsibilities, students meet weekly to synthesize work. Students gain admission to Theater 195 either through audition (performers) or through advance consultation (designers, stage managers, and assistant directors). Students register for Theater 195 during the add/drop period at the beginning of each semester. Students are required to commit a minimum of six hours a week to rehearsal and production responsibilities over a period of seven to twelve weeks; specific time commitments depend upon the role the student is assuming in the production and the production schedule. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit. May be repeated a maximum of four times for credit, earning a maximum of two credits.

212. Shakespeare's History Plays
William Watterson T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
Explores the relationship of Richard III, 2 Henry VI, and the second tetralogy (Richard II, the two parts of Henry IV and Henry V) to the genre of English chronicle play that flourished in the 1580s and 1590s. Readings in primary sources (More, Hall, and Holinshed) are supplemented by readings of critics (Tillyard, Kelly, Siegel, Greenblatt, Goldberg, etc.) concerned with locating Shakespeare's own orientation toward questions of history and historical meaning. Regular screenings of BBC productions.

220. Acting II: Voice and Text
Abigail Killeen M 9:30 - 11:25, W 9:30 - 11:25
An intermediate acting course focused on the link between language, thought, and feeling, with the goal of achieving full mind-body engagement in the act of communication. Students work with poetry, plays, and other dramatic texts to encourage vocal, physical, and emotional freedom. Breathing exercises attune students to the physiological impulse to speak, while vocal exercises concentrate on developing increased range, strength, and color of expression. Interpretation is explored through close readings of texts. This course, along with Theater 225, Acting II: Physical Theater, is part of a two-semester course series. Theater 220 and 225 may be taken individually or in any order.

270. Directing
Davis Robinson M 1:30 - 3:25, W 1:30 - 3:25
Introduces students to the major principles of play direction, including conceiving a production, script analysis, staging, casting, and rehearsing with actors. Students actively engage directing theories and techniques through collaborative class projects, and complete the course by conceiving, casting, rehearsing, and presenting short plays of their choosing. A final research and rehearsal portfolio is required.