Upcoming Events

German Language Table

March 24, 2015 5:30 PM  – 7:30 PM
Thorne Hall, Pinette Dining Room

Wir treffen uns jede Woche, um ein bisschen Deutsch miteinander zu sprechen, auch Anfaenger sind herzlich willkommen. Wir freuen uns auf euch!

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Chinese Language Dining Table

March 24, 2015 5:30 PM  – 7:00 PM
Thorne Hall, Hutchinson Room

Chinese Table is a conversational activity at dinnertime held weekly in the Thorne Dining Commons, Hutchinson Room, every Tuesday during the academic year, from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. It is an excellent opportunity for students to practice speaking Chinese in a casual and friendly environment. In addition, one can make friends and meet other Chinese speakers, including teachers, students, or people from the local community. Attendance is expected for students beyond the Chinese 1101 level, but also encouraged for those who speak Chinese already such as students from China or Taiwan. Please contact Suzanne Astolfi, sastolfi@bowdoin.edu, if you are interested in attending, but not enrolled in any Chinese course.

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Spindel Lecturer Neal Gabler: "How the Jews Invented Hollywood and Why"

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March 24, 2015 7:30 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

In the early years of Hollywood, five of the six major studios were headed by Jews; Jewish lawyers, Jewish writers, Jewish agents, Jewish producers, and Jewish exhibitors controlled much of the film business. Yet these movie moguls wanted to be regarded first as Americans and strived to reinvent themselves here as new men. In doing so, they created a powerful cluster of images and ideas - so powerful that, in a sense, they "colonized the American imagination". Through their movies, they painted an idealized portrait of an American society to which they were denied access. The movies made were quintessentially American while the men who made them were not.

In An Empire of Their Own: How the Jews Invented Hollywood, author Neal Gabler examines the psychological motivations of these film moguls, arguing that their background as Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe shaped their careers and influenced the movies they made. He explores how these producers (the 'Hollywood Jews') generally came from poor, fatherless backgrounds, and felt like outsiders in America because of their Jewishness. In Hollywood they were able to run their own industry, assimilate into the American mainstream, and produce movies that fulfilled their vision of the American dream.

Neil Gabler is a distinguished author, cultural historian, and television commentator who contributes regularly to the New York Times, the Boston Globe, and the Los Angeles Times. An Empire of Their Own: How the Jews Invented Hollywood won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for history, and the Theatre Library Association Award for the best book on television, radio, or film.

Sponsored by the Harry Spindel Memorial Lectureship Fund.

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Gabriel Perez-Barreiro: "Latitude 0'08791": Latin American Artists and Science Fiction

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March 26, 2015 4:30 PM  – 5:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Gabriel Perez-Barreiro delivers a keynote lecture exploring the ways in which various artists from Latin America used science and space travel as metaphors for expressing present day realities and imagined futures.

Perez-Barreiro is Director of the Coleccin Patricia Phelps de Cisneros, New York. From 2002 to 2008 he was Curator of Latin American Art at the Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin. In 2007, he was chief curator of the Sixth Mercosur Biennial in Porto Alegre, Brazil. From 2000 to 2002 he was Director of Visual Arts at The Americas Society, New York. Prior to that he was Exhibitions and Programs Coordinator at the Casa de America, Madrid. From 1993 to 1998 he was the founding curator of the University of Essex Collection of Latin American Art. He holds a PhD in Art History and Theory from the University of Essex.

Join us for the Bowdoin College Museum of Art Spring Open House immediately following the lecture at 5:30pm.

RSVPs are requested but not required. You many RSVP here: https://latitude008791.eventbrite.com or contact Christine Piontek at artmuseumevents@bowdoin.edu.

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Past Futures: Science Fiction, Space Travel, and Postwar Art of the Americas.

Photo: Gabriel Perez Barreiro

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A Musical Tribute to the Life of Pianist Frank Glazer

March 27, 2015 7:30 PM  – 9:00 PM
Studzinski Recital Hall, Kanbar Auditorium

KLAVIERFEST! Bowdoin will celebrate the life of Bates Artist in Residence Frank Glazer with a tribute concert by his colleagues and his protégé Duncan Cumming, and a concert by Henry Kramer.

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Chinese Language Dining Table

March 31, 2015 5:30 PM  – 7:00 PM
Thorne Hall, Hutchinson Room

Chinese Table is a conversational activity at dinnertime held weekly in the Thorne Dining Commons, Hutchinson Room, every Tuesday during the academic year, from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. It is an excellent opportunity for students to practice speaking Chinese in a casual and friendly environment. In addition, one can make friends and meet other Chinese speakers, including teachers, students, or people from the local community. Attendance is expected for students beyond the Chinese 1101 level, but also encouraged for those who speak Chinese already such as students from China or Taiwan. Please contact Suzanne Astolfi, sastolfi@bowdoin.edu, if you are interested in attending, but not enrolled in any Chinese course.

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German Language Table

March 31, 2015 5:30 PM  – 7:30 PM
Thorne Hall, Pinette Dining Room

Wir treffen uns jede Woche, um ein bisschen Deutsch miteinander zu sprechen, auch Anfaenger sind herzlich willkommen. Wir freuen uns auf euch!

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Craig Steven Wilder, Russwurm Lecture: 'Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America's Universities'

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March 31, 2015 6:30 PM  – 8:30 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Craig Steven Wilder, professor of history at MIT and a leading historian of race in America, will deliver the annual John Brown Russwurm Lecture in the Main Lounge of Moulton Union. A reception in the Russwurm House Library will precede the lecture at 5:00pm. Both events are free and open to the public. 

Professor Wilder will examine the contrasting figures of "the matriculating Indian" and "the uneducable Negro" to explore the limits on access to higher education in the second half of the 18th century. Looking closely at the experiences of two friends, the Reverend Samson Occom - a member of the Mohegan nation who became a Presbyterian minister, and poet Phillis Wheatley - the first African-American woman to be published, Professor Wilder will demonstrate how illusory were even the modest hopes of education held by Native and enslaved Americans. Though hailed by well-wishers as possessors of exceptional talents, Occum and Wheatley could find no institutional structures that would support them in intellectual, literary, or religious pursuits. 

This lecture stems from Wilder's important and widely reviewed new study, Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America's Universities, where he argues that many of America's revered colleges and universities were soaked in the sweat, the tears, and sometimes the blood of people of color.

Professor Wilder is a senior fellow at the Bard Prison Initiative, where he has served as a guest lecturer, commencement speaker, academic advisor, and visiting professor. For more than a decade, this innovative program has given hundreds of men and women the opportunity to acquire a college education during their incarcerations in the New York State prison system. 

He has advised and appeared in numerous historical documentaries, including the celebrated Ken Burns, Sarah Burns, and David McMahon film, The Central Park Five; Kelly Anderson's highly praised exploration of gentrification, My Brooklyn; the History Channel's F.D.R.: A Presidency Revealed; and Ric Burn's award-winning PBS series, New York: A Documentary History

Named after the first African-American graduate of Bowdoin College (class of 1826), the John Brown Russwurm lecture series explores "the legacy and status of Black Americans". Notable speakers include Robert Levine, Lani Guinier, Carl Stokes, Vernon Jordan, Shirley Chisholm, Bayard Rustin, Benjamin Hooks, and Julian Bond, among others.


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Film and Discussion: "Nostalgia for the Light"

March 31, 2015 7:00 PM  – 10:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

In this enthralling and award-winning documentary, Chilean master director Patricio Guzmn explores how astronomical observations of distant galaxies, the deep past of pre-Columbian archaeology, and the remnants of Chile?s painful political history converge in the Atacama desert, the world?s driest region.

Followed by a panel discussion with Allen Wells, Roger Howell, Jr. professor of history, Sarah Childress, visiting assistant professor of cinema studies, and Sarah Montross, Andrew W. Mellon post-doctoral curatorial fellow.

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition, Past Futures: Science Fiction, Space Travel, and Postwar Art of the Americas.

RSVPs are requested but not required.  You may RSVP here: https://nostalgiaforthelight.eventbrite.com
or contact Christine Piontek at artmuseumevents@bowdoin.edu.

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Talk by Dr. Noliwe Rooks

April 6, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

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