Spring 2013 Courses

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102. Elementary Spanish II
Eugenia Wheelwright M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25 Sills-109
Three class hours per week and weekly conversation sessions with assistant, plus laboratory assignments. An introduction to the grammar of Spanish, aiming at comprehension, reading, writing, and simple conversation. More attention is paid to reading and writing.

204. Intermediate Spanish II
Maria Baez M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25 Sills-111
Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with the assistant. Grammar fundamentals are reviewed. Class conversation and written assignments are based on readings in modern literature.

204. Intermediate Spanish II
Maria Baez M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25 Sills-111
Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with the assistant. Grammar fundamentals are reviewed. Class conversation and written assignments are based on readings in modern literature.

205. Advanced Spanish
Maria Baez T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25 Sills-111
The study of topics in the political and cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world in the twentieth century, together with an advanced grammar review. Covers a variety of texts and media and is designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the intellectual and artistic traditions of Spain and Latin America. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.

205. Advanced Spanish
Carolyne Wolfenzon Niego T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25 Sills-205
The study of topics in the political and cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world in the twentieth century, together with an advanced grammar review. Covers a variety of texts and media and is designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the intellectual and artistic traditions of Spain and Latin America. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.

209. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater
Elena Cueto-Asin M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 Sills-109
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish.

209. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater
Margaret Boyle T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Sills-205
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish.

210. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative
Nadia Celis M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25 Sills-109
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.

317. Almodóvar, Before and After: Reading Spanish Film
Elena Cueto-Asin M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55 Sills-205
Takes the cinema of Pedro Almodóvar as a frame to examine Spanish cinema from the past to the present. Connects the originality of Almodóvar, representative of the film of the democratic period inaugurated in the late-1970s, back to the techniques and genres used by earlier filmmakers, especially under the Franco dictatorship that critiqued or supported the regime. Traces his influence forward through films of recent decades by directors whose work links Spanish cinema to international trends. Taught in English. Written assignments will be required to be done in Spanish. Meets with Film Studies 317. Not open to studentswho have credit for Spanish 327.

318. A Journey around Macondo: García Márquez and His Contemporaries
Nadia Celis M 6:30 - 9:25 The Hazelton Room (Kanbar 109)
Studies the main topics, techniques, and contributions of Colombian Nobel Prize winner Gabriel García Márquez as presented in One Hundred Years of Solitude. Explores the actual locations, social, cultural, and literary trends that inspired the creation of Macondo, the so-called “village of the world” where the novel takes place, and the universal themes to which this imaginary town relates. Contemporary authors include Fuenmayor, Cepeda Samudio, and Rojas Herazo. An optional one-week study tour to Cartagena, Colombia will be held the first week of March break. There will be a fee of approximately $2000 for this optional study tour. Need-based financial aid will be available to students who receive financial aid from Bowdoin.

343. Imaginary Cities/Real Cities in Latin America
Carolyne Wolfenzon Niego M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 Pols House-Conf Room
Examines the representation of urban spaces in Spanish American literature during the last six decades. While mid-twentieth-century fictional towns such as Macondo and Comala tended to emphasize exoticism, marginality, and remoteness, more recent narratives have abandoned the “magical” and tend to take place in metropolitan spaces that coincide with contemporary large cities such as Lima and Buenos Aires. The treatment of social class divisions and transgressions, territoriality, and the impact of the space on the individual experience are studied in novels, short stories, and film from the 1950s to the present. Authors include Rulfo, García Márquez, Onetti, Donoso, Vargas Llosa, Sábato, Reynoso, Ribeyro, Piñera, Gutiérrez, Bellatín, Caicedo, and Junot Díaz, among others

344. Bad Girls on Stage in Early Modern Spain and Spanish America
Margaret Boyle T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 Sills-205
In both Early Modern Spain and Spanish America, the figure of the “bad girl” includes, for example, prostitutes, single women, orphans, abused wives, brainy women and back-stabbing girlfriends. Against the backdrop of the Spanish Inquisition, this course rethinks the category of the “bad girl” by examining early modern plays, chronicles and institutional manuals by authors including María de Zayas, Lope de Vega, Luís Vélez de Guevara, Sor Juana, and Bartolomé Arzáns. We will also consider how the figure is adapted by contemporary popular films in order to examine the relationships between gender, deviance, performance and rehabilitation. Taught in Spanish.