Location: Bowdoin / Spanish / Courses / Fall 2010

Spanish

Fall 2010

101. Elementary Spanish I
Maria Baez M  8:30 - 9:25
W  8:30 - 9:25
F  8:30 - 9:25
Three class hours per week and weekly conversation sessions with assistant, plus laboratory assignments. An introduction to the grammar of Spanish, aiming at comprehension, reading, writing, and simple conversation. Emphasis is on grammar structure, with frequent oral drills. Spanish 101 is open to first- and second-year students who have had less than one year of high school Spanish.

203. Intermediate Spanish I
Eugenia Wheelwright M  9:30 - 10:25
W  9:30 - 10:25
F  9:30 - 10:25
Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with the teaching assistant. Grammar fundamentals are reviewed. Class conversation and written assignments are based on readings in modern literature.

203. Intermediate Spanish I
Eugenia Wheelwright M  10:30 - 11:25
W  10:30 - 11:25
F  10:30 - 11:25
Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with the teaching assistant. Grammar fundamentals are reviewed. Class conversation and written assignments are based on readings in modern literature.

204. Intermediate Spanish II
Gustavo Faveron-Patriau M  10:30 - 11:25
W  10:30 - 11:25
F  10:30 - 11:25
Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with the assistant. Grammar fundamentals are reviewed. Class conversation and written assignments are based on readings in modern literature.

205. Advanced Spanish
John Turner T  10:00 - 11:25
TH 10:00 - 11:25
The study of a variety of texts and media, together with an advanced grammar review, designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.

205. Advanced Spanish
Carolyne Wolfenzon Niego M  11:30 - 12:55
W  11:30 - 12:55
The study of a variety of texts and media, together with an advanced grammar review, designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.

205. Advanced Spanish
Enrique Yepes T  2:30 - 3:55
TH 2:30 - 3:55
The study of a variety of texts and media, together with an advanced grammar review, designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.

209. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater
John Turner T  2:30 - 3:55
TH 2:30 - 3:55
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish.

210. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative
Esmeralda Ulloa T  10:00 - 11:25
TH 10:00 - 11:25
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.

302. The Idea of Latin America
Enrique Yepes T  6:30 - 9:25
Studies how the region currently known as “Latin America” has been conceptualized from the fifteenth to the twenty-first centuries. Which geopolitical interests have shaped the idea of a geographical entity called Latin America? What does the term mean in different parts of the world? What has been the fate of alternate terms such as Abya-Yala, Indo-America, just America, Iberian-America, Spanish America, or the Indies? The analysis of various texts (in literature, history, cartography, philosophy, art, film, music, journalism) introduces intellectual and political debates around these terms, the region’s vast diversity, and whether or not it makes sense to consider it a unit. Conducted in Spanish.

341. Colonial Experience and Post-colonial Perspectives
Esmeralda Ulloa T  1:00 - 2:25
TH 1:00 - 2:25
A contextualized study of key texts from the Colonial period with special attention to the way in which our historical and ideological distance informs our readings. How do contemporary scholarship on the concepts of history, text, and power enhance or limit our understanding? Texts include letters and journals of the conquistadors, mestizo narratives of lost empires and cultures, treatises on the legal status of the natives, and narratives of shipwreck and adventure in the New World, among others.

343. Imaginary Cities/Real Cities in Latin America
Carolyne Wolfenzon Niego M  2:30 - 3:55
W  2:30 - 3:55
Examines the representation of urban spaces in Spanish American literature during the last six decades. While mid-twentieth-century fictional towns such as Macondo and Comala tended to emphasize exoticism, marginality, and remoteness, more recent narratives have abandoned the “magical” and tend to take place in metropolitan spaces that coincide with contemporary large cities such as Lima and Buenos Aires. The treatment of social class divisions and transgressions, territoriality, and the impact of the space on the individual experience, are studied in novels, short stories, and film from the 1950s to the present. Authors include Rulfo, García Márquez, Onetti, Donoso, Vargas Llosa, Sábato, Reynoso, Ribeyro, Piñera, Gutiérrez, Bellatín, Caicedo, and Junot Díaz, among others.

348. The Others: The Nineteenth Century Latin American Novel
Gustavo Faveron-Patriau M  6:30 - 9:25
Explores different genres and styles of nineteenth-century Latin American prose fiction, focusing on the origins of modern narrative in the region, its connections with European and North American traditions, and the way Latin American writers developed new literary vehicles for the representation of the social realities of their countries. Readings include highlights of the romantic tradition such as Avellaneda’s Sab and Ricardo Palma’s Tradiciones peruanas; masterpieces of Gothic naturalism like Cambaceres’s Sin rumbo; Brazilian canonical novels like Machado de Assis’s Memorias póstumas de Bras de Cubas as well as the first classics of fantastic fiction by authors like Clemente Palma and Leopoldo Lugones. Conducted in Spanish