Fall 2012 Courses

Sociology

010. Racism
H. Partridge T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 Adams-202
Examines issues of racism in the United States, with attention to the social psychology of racism, its history, its relationship to social structure, and its ethical and moral implications.
101. Introduction to Sociology
Nancy Riley T 8:30 - 9:55, TH 8:30 - 9:55 Adams-208
The major perspectives of sociology. Application of the scientific method to sociological theory and to current social issues. Theories ranging from social determinism to free will are considered, including the work of Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Merton, and others. Attention is given to such concepts as role, status, society, culture, institution, personality, social organization, the dynamics of change, the social roots of behavior and attitudes, social control, deviance, socialization, and the dialectical relationship between individual and society.
101. Introduction to Sociology
Dhiraj Murthy T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Adams-208
The major perspectives of sociology. Application of the scientific method to sociological theory and to current social issues. Theories ranging from social determinism to free will are considered, including the work of Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Merton, and others. Attention is given to such concepts as role, status, society, culture, institution, personality, social organization, the dynamics of change, the social roots of behavior and attitudes, social control, deviance, socialization, and the dialectical relationship between individual and society.
206. Sociology of Education
Ingrid Nelson M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25 Sills-109
Examines the ways that formal schooling influences individuals and the ways that social structures and processes affect educational institutions. Explores the manifest and latent functions of education in modern society; the role education plays in stratification and social reproduction; the relationship between education and cultural capital; the dynamics of race, class, and gender in education; and other topics.
211. Classics of Sociological Theory
Laura Thomson M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 Adams-208
An analysis of selected works by the founders of modern sociology. Particular emphasis is given to understanding differing approaches to sociological analysis through detailed textual interpretation. Works by Marx, Weber, Durkheim, and selected others are read.
214. Social Media
Dhiraj Murthy T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25 Kanbar Hall-101 Computer Lab
Explores theoretical aspects of new media through specific case studies from social media. Students exposed to key readings in German critical theory including Benjamin, Adorno, and Horkheimer. Uses critical theory to uncover sociological understandings of new media. Race/ethnicity, power, surveillance/privacy, and community are themes used to explore mediated communication. Sociology 211 is recommended but not required.
221. Environmental Sociology
Shaun Golding T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 Adams-406
Applies sociological insights to investigating the ways that humans shape and are shaped by their ecological surroundings. Introduces theories and concepts for exploring how western society and more specifically contemporary American society interact with nature. Reviews central academic questions, including social constructions of nature and perceptions of ecological risks, and drawing from complementary readings and student-led dialogue, examines in greater depth ongoing struggles over conservation, sustainability, development, and social justice.
244. Migration, Work, and Inequality in the Global Economy
Shaun Golding T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25 Adams-202
Crossing borders that separate widely disparate levels of financial and political stability, transnational workers increasingly fuel the global economy. Examines the causes and implications of a mobile global workforce. Through popular and academic readings, films, and regular discussions, examines the forces that inform decisions to move, the role that migrants play in shaping sending and receiving communities culturally and materially, and migration’s emerging place in political dialogue at the local, national, and global scales.
251. Sociology of Health and Illness
Laura Thomson M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55 Adams-103
Examines the social contexts of physical and mental health, illness, and medical care. Deals with such topics as the social, environmental, and occupational factors in health and illness; the structure and process of health care organizations; the development of health professions and the health work force; doctor-patient relationships; ethical issues in medical research; and health care and social change.
265. Gender and Family in East Asia
Nancy Riley T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55 Adams-406
Family and gender are central to the organization of East Asian societies, both historically and today. Uses comparative perspectives to examine issues related to family and gender in China, Japan, and Korea. Using the enormous changes experienced in East Asia in recent decades as a context, explores the place of Confucian influences in these societies, the different roles of the state and economy, and the ways that gender and family have been shaped by and shaped those changes.
316. Transitions to Adulthood: From Sweet Sixteen to Reality Bites
Ingrid Nelson M 10:00 - 11:25, W 10:00 - 11:25 Adams-202
Examines adolescence and emerging adulthood from a sociological perspective. Explores why the transition to adulthood for American youth has grown longer in recent decades, and how this extended adolescence shapes and is shaped by social institutions (family, government, schooling). Focus on the role of college attendance. Attention to racial, ethnic, geographic, and socioeconomic variation draws together different theoretical and substantive issues in sociology in the United States, primarily since 1950. Discusses current controversies in the discipline, e.g., quantitative versus qualitative methodologies, micro versus macro perspectives, and pure versus applied work.
Shaun Golding 
SOC 221 Environmental Sociology
(same as: ES 221) Social and Behavioral Sciences
Applies sociological insights to investigating the ways that humans shape and are shaped by their ecological surroundings. Introduces theories and concepts for exploring how western society and more specifically contemporary American society interact with nature. Reviews central academic questions, includingsocial constructions of nature and perceptions of ecological risks, and drawing from complementary readings and student-led dialogue, examines in greater depth ongoing struggles over conservation, sustainability, development, and social justice.
Prerequisites:
Anth 101 or Soc 101, T TH 2:30 3:55
 
Shaun Golding
SOC 244 Migration, Work, and Inequality in the Global Economy
Crossing borders that separate widely disparate levels of financial and political stability, transnational workers increasingly fuel the global economy. Examines the causes and implications of a mobile global workforce.Through popular and academic readings, films, and regular discussions, examines the forces that inform decisions to move, the role that migrants play in shaping sending and receiving communities culturally and materially, and migration’s emerging place in political dialogue at the local, national, and global scales.
Pre-requisites:
Anth 101 or Soc 101, T TH
 
Laura Katherine Thomson
SOC 251 Sociology of Health and Illness
Examines the social contexts of physical and mental health, illness, and medical care. Deals with such topics as the social, environmental, and occupational factors in health and illness; the structure and process of health care organizations; the development of health professions and the health work force; doctor-patient relationships; ethical issues in medical research; and health care and social change.
Prerequisites:
Anth 101 or Soc 101, MW 2:30 3:55

Anthropology

013. Beyond Pocahontas: Native American Stereotypes
Kelly Fayard M  2:30 - 3:55
W  2:30 - 3:55
Adams-114
Traces the development of Native American stereotypes perpetuated by popular media both historically and presently. Considers effects of such stereotypes in contemporary media and popular culture. Analyzes films, literature, advertisements, cartoons, newspapers, magazines, and sports team mascots, among other forms of popular media and culture. Explores the diversity and variety of Native American peoples that are in opposition to media produced stereotypical images.
101. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Gregory Beckett T  10:00 - 11:25
TH 10:00 - 11:25
Searles-315
Cultural anthropology explores the diversities and commonalities of cultures and societies in an increasingly interconnected world. Introduces students to the significant issues, concepts, theories, and methods in cultural anthropology. Topics may include cultural relativism and ethnocentrism, fieldwork and ethics, symbolism, language, religion and ritual, political and economic systems, family and kinship, gender, class, ethnicity and race, nationalism and transnationalism, and ethnographic representation and validity.
201. Anthropological Research
Kelly Fayard M  11:30 - 12:55
W  11:30 - 12:55
Adams-406
Anthropological research methods and perspectives are examined through classic and recent ethnography, statistics and computer literacy, and the student’s own fieldwork experience. Topics include ethics, analytical and methodological techniques, the interpretation of data, and the use and misuse of anthropology.
203. History of Anthropological Theory
Krista Van Vleet T  1:00 - 2:25
TH 1:00 - 2:25
Sills-205
An examination of the development of various theoretical approaches to the study of culture and society. Anthropology in the United States, Britain, and France is covered from the nineteenth century to the present. Among those considered are Morgan, Tylor, Durkheim, Boas, Malinowski, Mead, Geertz, and Lévi-Strauss.
206. The Archaeology of Gender and Ethnicity
Leslie Shaw T  11:30 - 12:55
TH 11:30 - 12:55
Sills-207
Explores the lies of “people without history,” using archaeological data and emphasizing gender and ethnicity. Focuses on the Americas, and covers both prehistoric and historic archaeological site research, including Native American and African American examples. The long temporal aspect of archaeological data allows exploration of such issues as how gender inequality developed and how ethnic identity is expressed through material culture.
210. Global Sexualities, Local Desires
Krista Van Vleet T  10:00 - 11:25
TH 10:00 - 11:25
Sills-207
Explores the variety of practices, performances, and ideologies of sexuality through a cross-cultural perspective. Focusing on contemporary anthropological scholarship on sexuality and gender, asks whether Western conceptions of “sexuality,” “sex,” and “gender” help us understand the lives and desires of people in other social and cultural contexts. Topics may include Brazilian transgendered prostitutes (travestí), intersexuality, and the naturalization of sex; “third gendered” individuals and religion in Native North America, India, and Chile; language and the performance of sexuality by drag queens in the United States; transnationalism and the global construction of “gay” identity in Indonesia; lesbian and gay kinship; AIDS in Cuba and Brazil; and Japanese Takarazuka theater. In addition to ethnographic examples of alternative genders and sexualities (so called “third genders” and non-heterosexual sexualities) in both Western and non-Western contexts, also presents the major theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches used by anthropologists to understand sexuality, and considers how shifts in feminist and queer politics have also required anthropologists to focus on other social differences such as class, race, ethnicity, and post-colonial relations.
232. Bollywood, Kollywood and Beyond: Indian Cinema and Society
Sara Dickey M  11:30 - 12:55
W  11:30 - 12:55
Adams-202
Explores Indian films, film consumption, and film industries since 1947. Focuses on mainstream cinema in different regions of India, with some attention to the impact of popular film conventions on art cinema and documentary. Topics include the narrative and aesthetic conventions of Indian films, film magazines, fan clubs, cinema and electoral politics, stigmas on acting, filmmakers and filmmaking, rituals of film watching, and audience interpretations of movies. The production, consumption, and content of Indian cinema are examined in social, cultural, and political contexts, particularly with an eye to their relationships to class, gender, and nationalism. Attendance at weekly evening screenings is required.
271. The Caribbean in the Atlantic World
Gregory Beckett M  1:00 - 2:25
W  1:00 - 2:25
Adams-202
An introduction to the cultures and societies of the Caribbean, focusing on the historical changes that have accompanied the European “discovery” of the region and its integration into the wider Atlantic world. Focuses on the culture, history, and political economy of Haiti, Jamaica, and Cuba, among other cases. Topics include European conquest and colonialism; the trans-Atlantic slave trade; the sugar plantation; creolization and the creation of new languages, cultures, and religions; revolution and resistance to colonial and imperial domination; economic dependency and marginalization; the relation between the Caribbean and the United States; migration; popular culture; and tourism.
321. Animal Planet: Humans and Other Animals
Susan Kaplan T  6:30 - 9:25Adams-208
Cultures around the world maintain different stances about non-human animals. People eat meat or avoid doing so. Religions advocate veneration, fear, or loathing of certain animals. Domesticated animals provide us company, labor, and food. Wild animals are protected, studied, photographed, captured, and hunted. Animals inhabit novels, are featured in art, and adorn merchandise. Students read ethnographies, articles, animal rights literature, and children’s books; study museum collections; and examine animal themes in films and on the Web. Employing anthropological perspectives, students consider what distinguishes humans from other animals, how cultures are defined by peoples’ attitudes about animals, and what might be our moral and ethical responsibilities to other creatures.