Department Requirements

Requirements for the Major in Philosophy (for the class of 2016 and beyond)

The major consists of nine courses, which must include Philosophy 2111, 2112, and 2233. Of the remaining six courses, there must be at least one course with a primary focus on epistemology and metaphysics (Philosophy 1040–1049, 1400–1499, 2400–2499, 3400–3499); and there must be at least one course with a primary focus on value theory (Philosophy 1030–1039, 1300–1399, 2300–2399, 3300–3399). At least two classes must be from the advanced group (numbered 3000–3999). Unless an exception is made by the Department, a course that counts toward the major must be taken for a letter grade (not CR/D/F), and the student must earn a grade of C- or better.

Philosophy Major Checklist

Requirements for the Minor in Philosophy (for the class of 2016 and beyond)

The minor consists of five courses, which must include Philosophy 2111 and 2112, one other course from the intermediate group (numbered 2000–2969), and one course from the advanced group (numbered 3000–3969). The fifth course may be from any level. Unless an exception is made by the Department, a course that counts toward the minor must be taken for a letter grade (not CR/D/F), and the student must earn a grade of C- or better.

Philosophy Minor Checklist

Independent Study and Honors

Intermediate and advanced students are encouraged to pursue independent studies in topics of interest that are not covered by current course offerings. Students doing independent study for credit work closely with a member of the department during the course of a semester and produce a significant piece of writing at the end.

Philosophy majors with a departmental grade point average of 3.3 or better at the end of the junior year are eligible to undertake an Honors project in philosophy. Honors students write a project proposal in September, and then carry out a two-semester independent study culminating in an Honors thesis. Recent Honors projects include: “Words and Objects: Carnap and Quine on Metaontology”; “The Case Against Second-Order Logic as a Model of Logical Consequence”; “Selection Against Gender: Sex Selection, Reproductive Technology, and the Question of Moral Permissibility”; “The Meta-ethics of Simon Blackburn: Taking Morality Seriously on Naturalistic Grounds”; “An Examination of Michael Ruse’s Darwinian Approach to Philosophy.”