Location: Bowdoin / Italian / courses / Spring 2013

Italian

Spring 2013

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102. Elementary Italian II
Davida Gavioli M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25 Sills-107
Continuation of Italian 101. Three class hours per week, plus weekly drill sessions and language laboratory assignments. Study of the basic forms, structures, and vocabulary. More attention is paid to reading and writing.

102. Elementary Italian II
Jonathan Combs Schilling M 11:30 - 12:25, W 11:30 - 12:25, F 11:30 - 12:25 Adams-202
Continuation of Italian 101. Three class hours per week, plus weekly drill sessions and language laboratory assignments. Study of the basic forms, structures, and vocabulary. More attention is paid to reading and writing.

103. Accelerated Elementary Italian
Anna Rein M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25 Sills-205
Three class hours per week, plus one hour of weekly drill and conversation sessions with a teaching fellow. Covers in one semester what is covered in two-semesters in the 101–102 sequence. Study of the basic forms, structures, and vocabulary. Emphasis on listening comprehension and spoken Italian. For students with an advanced knowledge of a Romance language or by permission of instructor.

204. Intermediate Italian II
Anna Rein M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25 Sills-205
Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant. Aims to increase fluency in both spoken and written Italian. Grammar fundamentals are reviewed. Class conversation and written assignments are based on contemporary texts of literary and social interest.

208. Introduction to Contemporary Italy: Dalla Marcia alla Vespa
Davida Gavioli M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 Sills-111
In the recent past, Italy has experienced violent political, economic, and cultural changes. In short succession, it experienced Fascist dictatorship, the Second World War, the Holocaust, and Civil War, a passage from Monarchy to Republic, a transformation from a peasant existence to an industrialized society, giving rise to a revolution in cinema, fashion, and transportation. How did all this happen? Who were the people behind these events? What effect did they have on everyday life? Answers these questions, exploring the history and the culture of Italy from Fascism to contemporary Italy, passing through the economic boom, the “Years of Lead,” and the Mafia. Students have the opportunity to “relive” the events of the twentieth century, assuming the identity of real-life men and women. Along with historical and cultural information, students read newspaper articles, letters, excerpts from novels and short stories from authors such as Calvino, Levi, Ginzburg, and others, and see films by directors like Scola, Taviani, De Sica, and Giordana.

225. Italians at Sea: Exploration, Love, and Disaster from the Mediterranean to the Seven Seas
Jonathan Combs Schilling M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55 Sills-109
The sea has always served as a venue for human daring and a reservoir for tales of the human condition. From shipwrecks to melting icecaps, it is also a potent symbol of the precariousness of our existence. Italy’s cultural production serves as a case study through which to explore the seascape in its many forms: a horizon of desire, a space for cross-cultural encounters, a reflection of our stewardship of the “blue planet.” Topics include fictional and real accounts, through various media, of the Mediterranean and its inhabitants from antiquity to the present (the merchants of Boccaccio, the monsters of Ariosto, the haunting shores of Montale), Italian navigators such as Marco Polo and Columbus, and issues of colonialism, immigration, and environmental degradation.

327. Italians at Sea: Exploration, Love, and Disaster from the Mediterranean to the Seven Seas
Jonathan Combs Schilling M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55 Sills-109
The sea has always served as a venue for human daring and a reservoir for tales of the human condition. From shipwrecks to melting icecaps, it is also a potent symbol of the precariousness of our existence. Italy’s cultural production serves as a case study through which to explore the seascape in its many forms: a horizon of desire, a space for cross-cultural encounters, a reflection of our stewardship of the “blue planet.” Topics include fictional and real accounts, through various media, of the Mediterranean and its inhabitants from antiquity to the present (the merchants of Boccaccio, the monsters of Ariosto, the haunting shores of Montale), Italian navigators such as Marco Polo and Columbus, and issues of colonialism, immigration, and environmental degradation. For students with an Italian minor or Romance language major; all work will be done in Italian, and an extra weekly one-hour meeting will be used to discuss materials in Italian.