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Gibbons Summer Research Program

John A. Gibbons, Jr. '64 established the Gibbons Summer Research Program to enable students who are rising sophomores, juniors, and seniors to work with members of the faculty on projects that use technology to explore interdisciplinary areas and to develop fresh approaches to the study of complex problems. The students benefit not only by spending the summer focusing on a complex issue, but, as importantly, working closely with a faculty member, and learning how they study and analyze problems. Because Mr. Gibbons values interdisciplinary work and thinking, the students do not need to be working on projects in their major.

Information Technology is currently soliciting project ideas for teaching and research projects using technology as part of the Gibbons Summer Research Program. We are accepting proposals for projects that encourage collaboration with a student. Proposals should describe the project, its objectives, the participants, including the name of the student you would like to nominate, and the time frame for completion. Preference will be given to proposals received by Friday, February 28, 2014. Please contact Jennifer Snow for more information.

The program is coordinated through Information Technology. Please contact Jennifer Snow with questions and/or project ideas.

Summer 2013
Summer 2012
Summer 2011
Summer 2010
Summer 2009
Summer 2008
Summer 2007
Summer 2006
Summer 2005
Summer 2004

Summer 2013

Margaret McBride Bunke '14
Genevieve LeMoine, Curator/Registrar, The Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum

In 2014 the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum will host a new exhibit celebrating the hundredth anniversary of Donald B. MacMillan’s Crocker Land expedition (1913-1917), based in Northwest Greenland. The Museum recently completed processing a collection of journals, photographs, equipment, and research specimens from the family of Elmer Ekblaw, who was a geologist/ecologist on the expedition. Alexandra Brown spent the Summer of 2012 working with Museum staff to develop an interactive component for the upcoming exhibit based on Ekblaw’s personal journals. Meg Bunke's work with Museum staff built on that work. She developed maps using ArcGIS to highlight the sledging journeys that Ekblaw undertook in northern Greenland as well as his activities collecting and recording scientific data.

Evan Carlos Hoyt '15
Eric Chown, Professor, Department of Computer Science and
Pamela Fletcher, Associate Professor, Department of Art History

Evan Hoyt spent the summer collaborating with James Miller '14 (Mellon Fellow) and Eric Chown and Pamela Fletcher to identify and evaluate tools and potential student projects for the Gateway to the Digital Humanities course that was taught in Fall 2014. They explored different subjects (i.e. Art History, Religion, Philosophy, etc.), questions, and methods, and decided to focus on four categories: image analysis, text analysis, spatial analysis, and  network analysis. Throughout the process they learned about programming, tools being used in qualitative and quantitative research, the current state of the digital humanities, and the many facets of developing a new course.

Walker Davis Kennedy '15
Michael Birenbaum Quintero, Assistant Professor, Department of Music

Michael Birenbaum Quintero regularly leads Bowdoin's Afro-Latin music group and teaches the student performers the complex rhythms that they encounter in the music. Walker Kennedy spent the summer developing software training programs using Max MSP to help those students learn the songs and musical parts, and enable practice time outside the classroom. Over the course of the summer, he developed software to highlight the rhythms of eight songs for eight drums and plans to develop as many as 30 more before he graduates.

Article:
Walker Kennedy ’15 Creates Hi-Tech Tool to Teach Traditional Afro-Latin Music

Gabriela Serrato Marks '15
Michele LaVigne, Assistant Professor, Department of Earth and Oceanographic Science

Gabriela Serrato Marks and Michele LaVigne spent the summer exploring new technological applications to the study of deep-sea corals. They sought new methods for processing data sets using Excel and MATLAB to analyze the coral samples. Additionally, Gabriela collected new data from Michele's bamboo coral samples to investigate growth band composition and crystal orientation using powerful analytical technologies available within the EOS department, including the scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and electron backscatter diffraction systems.

Ruben Martinez '15
Steve Majercik, Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science and
Frank Mauceri, Lecturer, Department of Music

Ruben Martinez spent the summer creating a genetic program for generating visually appealing swarm behaviors. Genetic programs work by generating a population of random "solutions" and subjecting them to an evolution-like process. For some number of generations, individuals are evaluated, the better ones are recombined with each other in a process that mimicks biological reproduction, and the fittest individuals become the next generation. The swarm behaviors, each of which controlled the speed, size, and population of a swarm, were the individuals in the population. They were visualized via a Java applet, allowing them to be evaluated with respect to their visual appeal by one or more human viewers. The resulting score was then used to decide which behaviors would be recombined to generate the next generation, with the goal of producing increasingly well-rated behaviors.

Matthew Evan Savard '14
Rachel Beane, Professor, Department of Earth and Oceanographic Science

Matthew Savard and Rachel Beane spent the summer developing workable models for using mobile computing to enhance student learning and to augment field- and microscope-based scientific research for EOS courses and lab sessions. Matt visited Giant Stairs in Harpswell as a test location to try various mobile apps for the collection and comparison of data. Additionally, his work helped to determine when, where, and how mobile apps might complement existing methods and assignments in several EOS courses.

Michael Jay Smith '16
Patrick Rael, Associate Professor, Department of History

Patrick Rael has been joining historical census and voting data with historical maps of the United States for many years using ArcGIS. As a result, he often assigns GIS projects in several of his courses. Last summer Michael Smith continued work on Rael's historical atlas project and prepared data for future courses. He digitized the agricultural census of 1850, mapped votes for and against the secession of southern states in 1861, and formatted census datasets dating back to 1790.

Natasha Soto '15
Krista Van Vleet, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology

Natasha Soto and Krista Van Vleet spent the summer exploring representations of children and family in popular culture, religious institutions, and NGOs in Cuzco, Peru. Natasha's work focused on digital photos and videos of teenage mothers and their children who live in an orphanage in Cuzco. Her work on the project aimed to accomplish three key components: 1. to catalog hundreds of images taken by young mothers about their everyday experiences, 2. to analyze the video of a play detailing the experiences of a "typical" girl and to transcribe and translate its audio component, and 3. to collect images of teenage mothers and their children produced and circulated on websites to determine how they are portrayed to the general public.

Kaylee Shae Wolfe '15
Ingrid Nelson, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology

Ingrid Nelson collaborated with the Mitchell Institute to conduct a study about parental support, the college application process, and overall college satisfaction. She and students in her Fall 2012 class, Transitions to Adulthood, gathered data on 30 students who received scholarships from the Mitchell Institute. Kaylee Wolfe spent her summer analyzing that data, including responses to interview questions about high school and college experiences, the transition to college, and life since college. She used NVivo to clean and code the data and then to run queries to learn more about the students through their data. Additionally, Kaylee and Ingrid completed a paper and hope to present their findings at an upcoming conference.

Article:
Q&A: Students Investigate the College Application Process for Mainers

Summer 2012

Alexandra Sichel Brown ‘13
Genevieve LeMoine, Curator/Registrar, The Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum

In 2014 the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum will host a new exhibit celebrating the hundredth anniversary of Donald B. MacMillan’s Crocker Land expedition (1913-1917), based in Northwest Greenland. The Museum recently acquired a collection of journals, photographs, equipment, and research specimens from the family of Elmer Ekblaw, who was a geologist/ecologist on the expedition. Alexandra Brown spent the summer working with Museum staff to develop an interactive component for the upcoming exhibit based on Ekblaw’s personal journals, including a blog that shares the highs and lows of the expedition.

John Butterworth, III ‘14
Robert Greenlee, Professor, Department of Music
Nathaniel Wheelwright, Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Natural Sciences, Department of Biology

The bird family Columbidae consists of more than 300 species of pigeons and doves. Some of these species use rhythm as an important signifier in their songs, and the rhythms of their songs are often organized in ways akin to rhythms commonly employed by humans. John Butterworth spent the summer transcribing the coos of pigeons and doves from around the world using Raven software to measure and analyze the sounds. He collaborated with Robert Greenlee and Nat Wheelwright to summarize the findings and report on them.

Article:
Ornithologist and Musician Team Up to Solve Birdsong Mysteries

Sether Borden Hanson ‘13
Ericka Albaugh, Assistant Professor, Department of Government and Legal Studies

Sether Hanson and Ericka Albaugh collaborated to produce maps of language spread in West Africa using ArcGIS. Certain languages spread beyond their ethnic “core” and become nearly universal lingua francas in a particular region, others spread but do not become singularly dominant, still others stay connected to their ethnic group almost exclusively, and others recede to fewer speakers than their ethnic group and are replaced by another neighboring language. Sether and Ericka’s summer work included creating a “language spread” variable of six language groups in West Africa so that they could map the shifts due to geography, war, boundaries, and education. The results of their project include maps to enable more detailed analysis of the data.

Richard Andres Hopkins ‘13
Allen Tucker, Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Natural Sciences Emeritus, Department of Computer Science

Second Helpings is a regional food “rescue” operation based in Charleston, SC. Its volunteers pick-up food at supermarkets and deliver it to churches, food banks, and senior centers in Beaufort and Jasper counties. Richard Hopkins and Allen Tucker continued their work on a mobile app, Homeplate that will allow Second Helpings’ volunteers to accurately report via mobile devices the quantity of food that is picked up and delivered each year. Their work added functionality to the Homeplate app making it possible for the volunteers to directly enter information into the app at each pick-up and delivery stop in an attempt to replace the manual process that is currently used.

Article:
There’s a Bowdoin App for That: Computer Science Prof. and Student Design App for the Common Good

Min Sun (Sarah) Lee ‘14
John Lichter, Samuel S. Butcher Associate Professor in the Natural Sciences, Department of Biology
Eileen Johnson, Program Manager and GIS Analyst, Environmental Studies Program

Sarah Lee worked with John Lichter and Eileen Johnson on an ongoing project, “Ecological and economic recovery and sustainability of the Kennebec and Androscoggin rivers and their common estuary and nearshore marine environments.” She performed GIS analysis on historic fishing grounds along the coast of Maine and integrated historical records of fishing landings into the research along with the location and distribution of historical fish populations.

Somya Artidiang Mawrie '14
Dhiraj Murthy, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology

Somya Mawrie spent the summer in the Social Network Innovation Lab working with Dhiraj Murthy and SNIL staff to develop and deploy a number of surveys and interview instruments. She also conducted and documented both face-to-face and virtual ethnographic interviews and gained hands-on experience in transcription and qualitative coding practices. Additionally she worked with a trust dataset that was developed by other student researchers during the academic year.

Alexander Robert Pensavalle ‘14
Dhiraj Murthy, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology

Alex Pensavalle spent the summer in the Social Network Innovation Lab working with Dhiraj Murthy and SNIL staff on a wide variety of projects. These included the development of applications to collect real-time data from a variety of social networks, working to prepare and transform collected data for analysis and visualization, developing innovative tools to allow for the visualization of collected and created data, as well as exploring a number cutting edge techniques in the fields of machine learning/classification and natural language processing. He learned versatility through exposure to a variety of tools, methods, databases, and programming languages for the desktop and web-based environments under the mentorship of the lab’s resident programmer.

Rachel Nicole Pollinger ‘15
Eric Gaze, Director of the Quantitative Reasoning Program, Center for Learning and Teaching

Meridian Stories is a series of monthly digital storytelling competitions for Middle and High School students utilizing digital content creation to accomplish curricular goals. Each competition challenges teams of students to create short-form stories using images, words, video, and music in the service of core curricular objectives. Rachel Pollinger and Eric Gaze spent time researching and curating the core mathematical curricular goals for Middle and High School students. They developed ten mathematical challenges, developed championship round challenges, and participated in the design and implementation of focus groups to determine the efficacy and engagement of the proposed mathematical challenges.

Niliezer Delia Vazquez ‘14
Brian Purnell, Assistant Professor, Africana Studies Program

Niliezer Vazquez worked with Brian Purnell to chart new immigrants’ settlement patterns as well as changing urban community demographics. She created group-focused charts and intergroup comparative charts. Additionally, she used the Library’s Social Explorer database to generate maps to depict changing immigration patterns in major cities (New York, Chicago, Los Angeles); declining “Rustbelt” cities (Detroit, Pittsburg, Youngstown); emerging “Sunbelt” cities (Phoenix, Dallas-Fort Worth, San Diego); and mid-sized to small metropolitan areas (Portland/Lewiston, ME; Minneapolis, MN; Sioux Falls, ND), which did not have noticeable immigration populations from the global regions (Africa, Southeast Asia, Central and South America) that fed the post-1965 immigration waves.

John Robert Visentin ‘14
Eric Chown, Professor, Department of Computer Science

As an assignment in Computer Science 281 (Mobile Computing) in Fall 2011, Rob Visentin and Stephanie Bond (Gibbons Program, Summer 2011) began work on an app designed to provide location information to anyone wandering around Bowdoin’s campus. The app contains a map of campus with interactive buttons at each building to direct users to more information, photos, descriptions, departments, hours, etc. Rob continued work on the app with Eric Chown to make some improvements, including displaying the user’s current location using GPS, offering self-tours of buildings based on one’s location, and posting a list of events happening that day. The app will be available to purchase from the Apple App Store in Spring 2013.

Article:
There’s a Bowdoin App for That: Rob Visentin '14 Builds New Campus Guide

Summer 2011

Stephanie Craig Bond
Dhiraj Murthy, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology

Stephanie Bond and Dhiraj Murthy spent the summer exploring questions about how Twitter is organized and the role of communicative interactions in it. The project uses Twitter as its case study to contribute generally to a more sophisticated understanding of social media websites as evolving socio-technical systems and particularly to the role of social networking technologies in those systems. Stephanie continued where Scott Longwell (Gibbons Program, Summer 2010) left off refining algorithms, rewriting parameters and scripts, and automating the process.

John Nicola Bruno
Phil Camill, Rusack Associate Professor, Environmental Studies Program
Eileen Johnson, Program Manager, Environmental Studies Program
Keisha Payson, Coordinator for a Sustainable Bowdoin, Facilities Management

The Working Group on Sustainability (WGS) is working to implement aspects of the College’s Climate Action Plan. Specifically, the WGS is responsible for those components of the plan that pertain to measurable reductions in carbon emissions associated with changes in behavior amongst the Bowdoin community. The target for carbon emission reductions as part of the overall goal is 5%. Reaching the College's goal of carbon neutrality will require a combination of innovative approaches that appeal to a wide range of audiences. John Bruno spent the summer researching and developing ways of identifying visual aids to show faculty, staff, and students the positive effects of reducing usage of computers or using alternative modes of transportation.

David Allen Dietz
Peter Lea, Associate Professor, Department of Earth and Oceanographic Science

David Dietz and Peter Lea spent the summer working to develop virtual field trips to outcrops of sedimentary rocks (rare in Maine and inaccessible to students under the normal course schedule). With Information & Technology staff, they developed virtual field trips to provide different levels of scaffolding for students (i.e., guided tours, feedback/hints, or expert interpretations). Eventually they would to make the tool available to the broader geoscience community. Additionally, David worked with Eric Gaze in the Quantitative Skills Program and Collin Roesler in EOS to develop Quantitative Skills resources for students in EOS.

Brian Wood Jacobel
Daniela Oliveira, Assistant Professor, Department of Computer Science

Brian Jacobel and Daniela Oliveira spent the summer investigating computer attacks and trying to improve computer security. They have a virtual machine (VM) system that is able to detect worm attacks that can wreak havoc on a computer system. The VM system takes periodic checkpoints of memory, registers, and other events and detects attacks using information-control flow. Upon an attack, the system detects the malicious network source (IP address) associated with the attack, goes back to an earlier checkpoint, and then replays system execution while removing the malicious attack packets. They investigated how they can remove the malicious events from the system and regenerate the environment.

Atilano Rodriguez
Dhiraj Murthy, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology

Atilano Rodriguez spent the summer working in Dhiraj Murthy’s Social Network Innovation Lab studying advanced virtual communities (interaction within the community is done entirely on the Internet) to see how race is negotiated as well as how communities interact with race. He examined what happens in the virtual communities and then analyzed what effect it has on underrepresentation, specifically of minority racial groups, in the sciences. After determining a sampling method, he selected random participants and gathered statistics on the members, he then developed an online survey to ask questions to gather information about demographics, backgrounds, and experiences within the virtual community.

Molly E.C. Taft
Genevieve LeMoine, Curator/Registrar, The Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum

During the summer of 2011 the Arctic Museum staff began preparing a new exhibit featuring the animals and plants of the North American Arctic that is scheduled to open in the spring of 2012. The exhibit will use a combination of natural history specimens, Inuit art, photographs, and digital media to introduce audiences to the plants and animals of the far north, and to Inuit perceptions of their environment. Molly Taft spent the summer identifying the exhibit materials and preparing a series of stations that will enable visitors to see raw Arctic species in their natural environments.

Article:
Museum Intern Offers Arctic Objects to the World

Leah Yen Wang
Nathaniel Wheelwright, Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Natural Sciences, Department of Biology
Jeffrey Ward, Ashmead White Director of Athletics, Department of Athletics

Leah Wang spent the summer creating maps of local-area resources and activities. In an effort to generate more interest in natural history as well as the area, Leah generated maps of places within walking or biking distance, including the Bowdoin Pines, Coleman Farm, the Brunswick Commons, Crystal Spring Farm, and the Cathance River Education Alliance (CREA). Additionally, she developed a map that highlights the area’s recreational opportunities, including running routes, biking routes, hiking trails, fishing spots, cross country ski trails, power boat locations, and other natural resource sites of interest. The results of her work are available as a trail guide.

Article:
Leah Wang '12 Creates Trail Guide to Lure Students Outside

Download:
Bowdoin College Trail Guide

Madison Catherine Whitley
Wendy Christensen, Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology of Anthropology

Madison Whitley and Wendy Christensen spent the summer examining the ways that individuals are able to use online technology to control the information they and others see. They collected a comparative sample of data from web blogs and analyzed the strategies that blog owners and commenters use to control the boundaries of discussions on blogs. Specifically, they collected the content (posts and comments) of three years of two-dozen blogs written by mothers of military members who are serving, or have served in Iraq or Afghanistan. Then they identified and strategically selected mothers’ blogs, with the goal of having a sample that includes all branches of the military, different orientations toward war, and different blogging technologies with varying comment features. Next steps include categorizing the blogs, interviewing the bloggers, and analyzing their findings.

Joshua Bestor Zalinger
Eric Chown, Professor, Department of Computer Science

Josh Zalinger is a member of Eric Chown's Robocup team and participated in last summer’s Robocup Championship in Istanbul. Additionally, he conducted research on the Nao robots that competed last summer. Robots have vision problems. The two biggest problems are being able to look at something and understand what it is. The process of accurately translating a picture into meaningful data about the robot’s surroundings is challenging. Even if robots are able to perfectly understand what they are looking at, there is still the more fundamental problem of knowing where to look. If someone walks past the robot on its left side, it is surprisingly hard for it to know it should turn to the left. Josh spent the summer attempting to solve this problem as part of his research.

Summer 2010

William Albuquerque
WBOR

Will Albuquerque spent the summer digitizing the College radio station, WBOR's vast CD collection. In an attempt to make the collection more manageable as well as more accessible to the student and community DJ's, Will digitized the collection using iTunes. Additionally, he began cataloging the music so that the collection can be easily searched.

Article:
Maybank, E. (2010, May 7). WBOR manager to digitize radio station's CD, vinyl collection. The Bowdoin Orient.

Edwin Bennett Johnson
Eric Chown, Professor, Department of Computer Science

Ben Johnson continued developing iPhone applications, including modifying and updating the code for the Dining Menu app that he originally built last summer. Additionally, he worked with Information & Technology staff to build an infrastructure for future iPhone and iPad development.

Articles:
Bowdoin iPhone Dining App
Computer Science Majors Find Ready Employment Is Part Of The Program

Scott Alden Longwell
Dhiraj Murthy, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology

Scott Longwell and Dhiraj Murthy spent the summer exploring questions about how Twitter is organized and the role of communicative interactions in it. The project uses Twitter as its case study to contribute generally to a more sophisticated understanding of social media websites as evolving socio-technical systems and particularly to the role of social networking technologies in those systems. Scott developed an application to gather data from Twitter about various lists and ongoing conversations. Then he and Dhiraj analyzed the data that they collected.

Sean Patrick McElroy
Patrick Rael, Associate Professor, Department of History

Sean McElroy and Patrick Rael spent the summer gathering data and creating maps for an historical census data project. Since Fall 2003, Patrick Rael has been acquiring historical datasets containing information from the federal decennial censuses (1790-1920) that students in his 200-level courses manipulate and then plot using ArcGIS. Sean's summer tasks included improving the data that currently exists by correcting it, supplementing it, and adding new variables.

Article:
Sean McElroy '12 Awarded Beinecke Scholarship

Danielle Rae McAvoy
Steve Majercik, Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science
Janice Jaffe, Assistant Director for Public Engagement, McKeen Center for the Common Good

Danielle McAvoy spent the summer developing curriculum for a community-service project. She proposed to connect the Computer Science Department to community and non-profit organizations in the Brunswick and Portland areas. She worked to identify organizations that could benefit from a programming project that an undergraduate Computer Science student could realistically undertake and successfully complete. Additionally, Danielle successfully organized a Technology Day that connected the two groups on October 29, 2010.

Articles:
IT and McKeen Center hold First-ever "Technology Day"
Computer Science Majors Find Ready Employment Is Part Of The Program
Five Bowdoin Women Awarded Luce Research Fellowships

G. Nathaniel Merritt
Eric Chown, Professor, Department of Computer Science

Nathan Merritt spent the summer working on the gait of the robots used by the RoboCup team. He and Eric Chown worked to extend a modular, dynamic gait learning leaning system so that their robots could optimize their gait on the fly. Their research is on the cutting edge of both machine learning and bipedal motion and relies on a machine learning system called particle swarm optimizer (PSO). Nathan started work to develop a system that would benefit the robots in both simulated and competitive situations.

Article:
Computer Science Majors Find Ready Employment Is Part Of The Program

Nicholas Newhall Riker
Genevieve LeMoine, Curator/Registrar, The Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum

Nick Riker spent the summer working with the staff of The Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum as they prepared a new exhibit, Imagination Takes Shape: Canadian Inuit Art from the Robert and Judith Toll Collection. Because this exhibit will be the first opportunity for the public to view this new collection, Nick worked with Genny LeMoine to develop concepts for delivering the exhibit's content via mobile devices, including the iPod Touch and iPad.

Chase Blackstone Taylor
Ericka Albaugh, Assistant Professor, Department of Government and Legal Studies

Chase Taylor and Ericka Albaugh spent the summer developing maps of language and political mobilization in Cameroon using ArcGIS. Chase researched the electoral boundaries of Cameroon, scanned paper maps of Cameroon's ethnic groups, and used ArcGIS to view and understand that information spatially.

John Philip Wendell
Thomas Baumgarte, Professor, Department of Physics

John Wendell and Thomas Baumgarte spent the summer working on a project in numerical relativity. They explored coordinate conditions unique to black holes. In order to analyze these conditions, they constructed solutions numerically on a computer. John's summer work supported his academic interests and will result in an honors thesis.

Article:
Dennison, K., Wendell, J., Baumgarte, T., & Brown, J. (2010). Trumpet slices of the Schwarzschild-Tangherlini spacetime. Physical Review D, 82, 124057-1-124057-10. (Featuring John Wendell '11)
Note: PDF of full article is available by subscription to Bowdoin community members

Summer 2009

Kauri Ballard '10
Janet Martin, Professor, Department of Government

Kauri Ballard and Janet Martin worked on Professor Martin's play, "Mrs. Roosevelt's Chronicles." The play will be comprised of thirteen vignettes with mini-documentaries that will provide historical, political racial, and cultural context. Kauri spent part of the summer locating images from various sources, including the American Memory Project of the Library of Congress and the National Archives, cataloging them, and obtaining copyright permission. Additionally, she developed the mini-documentaries using iMovie.

Joanna Caldwell '10
Genny LeMoine, Curator/Registrar, Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum

The Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum began work on a database of Inuit art and artists in their current collection as well as anticipated donations in preparation for an upcoming exhibit (Fall 2010). The goal was to make the contents of the database available to visitors via a public access kiosk. Joanna Caldwell spent the summer collecting data, researching biographical information about the art and artists, entering the data into the Museum’s databases, and thinking about how visitors would access the information.

Sabrina Cote '10
Sarah McMahon, Associate Professor, Department of History

The Times Record donated about 100 years of photographs that they printed to the Pejepscot Historical Society. The photographs present a remarkable pictorial history of the Brunswick-Bath-Topsham-Harpswell area. Sabrina Cote and Sarah McMahon researched the photographs in hopes of finding images to support Sarah's research of the Harpswell community from 1840-1910 and Sabrina's research for an advanced independent study that she undertook in the Spring 2010 semester. In addition to researching the photographs, Sabrina spent the summer scanning the images, cataloging them, and connecting the photographs to historic maps using ArcGIS.

Elise Krob '10
Eric Chown, Professor, Department of Computer Science

Two summers ago new robots were introduced at RoboCup 2008 that presented new challenges and obstacles as well as opportunities to streamline and revitalize the RoboCup Team's robots' code base, specifically to improve their vision. The new robots can see more pixels, which means that they need need help processing the additional pixels as well as colors and values that comprise objects. Elise Krob, the Bowdoin RoboCup team, and Eric Chown spent last summer developing a new vision system to insure that the robots could process all of the colors and objects that they would encounter on the soccer field.

Article:
Gibbons Summer Research Program: Elise Krob and Professor Eric Chown

Devon Layne '09
Carey Phillips, Professor, Department of Biology

Devon Layne and Carey Phillips worked to develop a virtual world representation of Chersonesos, an ancient Greek colony, as it existed in 300 BC. The virtual city was created on an island in Second Life, a virtual chat environment. Devon spent the summer reconstructing a series of Greek bath houses to demonstrate how their design and functionality evolved over time. Additionally, he created architectural elements of the baths, highlighting the intricate design of the heating and water-management systems, and recreating the period artwork. The virtual Chersonesos will eventually be used by local high schools as part of cultural reenactment and problem-solving exercises.

Danielle Marias '10
Barry Logan, Associate Professor, Department of Biology

Danielle Marias and Barry Logan proposed to use a computer model of plant architecture, Y-plant, to examine the impact of growth deformations on self-shading and photosynthesis in white spruce infected with a parasite, dwarf mistletoe. Y-plant was originally developed for understorey broad-leafed shrubs. This project represented the first attempt to use Y-plant on a conifer. Information & Technology staff as well as Professor Logan's colleagues at Fordham University worked with Danielle to recode the software to meet her needs.

Article:
Summer Research: Why is Mistletoe a Kiss Goodbye for White Spruce?

Octavian Neamtu '12
Steve Majercik, Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science
Frank Mauceri, Lecturer, Department of Music

Collaborating with Steve Majercik and Frank Mauceri, Octavian Neamtu spent the summer studying swarm models to determine whether they could be integrated with musical parameters. He then developed swarm models and applied them to musical improvisation and performance using MIDI devices for input and for sound generation. The first half of the summer included developing and evolving the swarm models, while the second half was spent mapping the system to the production of music and integrating that with a live performance.

Danielle Willey '12
Peter Lea, Associate Professor, Department of Geology

Danielle Willey and Peter Lea spent the summer developing virtual sedimentary geology field trips of the Reid State Park beach and the Catskill Mountains in New York. With Information & Technology staff, they developed tools to display navigable field photographs on Google Earth and provided students with the ability to take field notes and interact with others. The virtual field trips simulate activities that geology students undertake when they are actually in the field.

Summer 2008

Angela Fabunan '10
Charles Dorn, Assistant Professor and Chair, Education


Angela worked with Charles Dorn to design a publication and posters for the September 2008 opening of the McKeen Center for the Common Good. The publication and posters included content from primary source materials, including letters, photographs, and newspaper articles commemorating the College's history of seeking the "Common Good."  In addition to scanning images and researching content for the publication and posters, Angela used InDesign to design the posters for the Center's opening.

Hillary Hooke '09
Genevieve LeMoine, Curator/Registrar, Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum
Susan Kaplan, Director, Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum


In April 2008, the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum opened an exhibit commemorating the centennial of Robert E. Peary's 1908-1909 North Pole Expedition.  Hillary worked with Museum staff to develop a blog featuring various expedition members' diary and log entries as well as photographs.   She selected daily blog entries from among journals and logs in the Museum's collection and identified photographs to accompany the blog postings.  She prepared blog entries in advance of their publication date so that the blog would appear in "real time."  (Entries written in February 1909 were posted in February 2009.)

Christopher Jacob '09
Brad Burnham, Head Coach, Swimming
Dale Syphers, Professor, Physics and Astronomy


Christopher worked with Brad Burnham during the summer of 2007 to develop software and instruments to capture, analyze, and display data about swimmers.  The data generated from the instruments as well as video helped them analyze swimmers' stroke patterns and underwater gliding.  During the summer of 2008 Chris used that software to collect additional information.  He and Brad installed sensors around the pool to collect images to measure position on many swimmers at one time.  They hoped to use the images to examine the cause and effect relationships between body shapes and speeds.  Additionally, they hoped to use the software and sensors to compare a swimmer's speed wearing two different swimsuits and determine whether special swimsuits enabled the swimmers to swim faster.

Benjamin Lovell '10
Patrick Rael, Associate Professor, History


Ben continued gathering data and creating GIS maps for Patrick Rael's historical census data project. Since Fall 2003, Patrick has been acquiring historical datasets containing information from the federal decennial censuses (1790-1920) that students in his 200-level courses manipulate and then plot using ArcGIS. Ben's summer tasks included improving the data that currently exists by correcting it, supplementing it, and adding new variables.  He is currently working with some of the data as part of an independent study.

Duncan Masland '11
Matt Klingle, Assistant Professor, History
Eileen Johnson, Program Manager, Environmental Studies
Madeleine Msall, Associate Professor, Physics and Astronomy
Karen Topp, Lecturer, Physics and Astronomy


Duncan worked on two projects.  With Matt Klingle and Eileen Johnson he worked on a project exploring the living history of the Androscoggin River.  He developed a blog with Information & Technology staff to allow Bowdoin students to communicate with Mt. Ararat Middle School (Topsham, ME) students about the project.  Additionally, Duncan tracked down documents and developed an interactive map interface.

Duncan also worked with Madeleine Msall and Karen Topp to develop an online physics placement exam using Bowdoin's course management tool, Blackboard. First-year students (Class of 2012), who needed additional skills in physical reasoning and problem solving, took the online exam during Orientation in Fall 2008.

Chris Necchi '10
Peter Lea, Associate Professor, Geology
Janet Martin, Professor, Government


Chris worked on two projects.  With Peter Lea he worked on the Maine Watershed Web project, which is dedicated to collaborative education, research, and stewardship of Maine watersheds.  The web site is at http://learn.bowdoin.edu/apps/hydrology/watersheds/.  He worked with Peter and Information & Technology staff to develop ways for Bowdoin participants and others to integrate and update weekly water quality data into the web site.  Additionally, he took photographs from the field and developed Google Map displays for the web site.

Chris also worked with Janet Martin to research digital imagery to accompany her upcoming play, The Roosevelt Chronicles.  The play will consist of vignettes from the past 75 years that illustrate Presidents' interactions with women and issues of concern to women.  Historical images will be projected between each vignette.  Chris looked for images, reviewed them, researched copyright permissions, and cataloged Janet's image collection.

Summer 2007

Zoe Eddy '10
Genny LeMoine, Curator/Registrar, Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum

Zoe's project with the Arctic Museum was an extension of a project started during the summer of 2006 by another Gibbons intern.  She will continued work developing an interactive map/timeline of Robert E. Peary's Arctic expeditions for use in the Museum's exhibit, Northward over the Great Ice: Robert E. Peary's North Pole Expeditions .   With guidance from curatorial staff, Zoe collected historical materials to use in the exhibit.   Additionally, she worked with Information & Technology staff to acquire digital media and incorporated these elements into an interactive exhibit.

Jeffrey Friedlander '08
Vineet Shende, Assistant Professor, Department of Music

Jeffrey and Vin worked on two projects. The first project introduced Jeff to Finale, a notational program to extract and format musical compositions. He worked with several of Vin's compositions. Secondly, he and Vin set-up and wrote programs for the Music Department's Electronic Music Studio. Jeff hopes to work in music technology after graduation; both projects introduced him to software and tools that he will use.

Christopher Jacob '09
Brad Burnham, Head Coach, Swimming, Athletics Department
Dale Syphers, Professor, Department of Physics

Chris developed software necessary to capture, analyze, and display data about swimmers so that it is useful for the subjects.   The data was generated from a prototype towing machine mounted to the pool deck and attached to a swimmer through a line wrapped around a drum in the machine, (imagine a very sophisticated fishing reel). The position and voltage sensors in the towing machine collected 3.5 million data-points about the swimmer from each 15 second pass.   The goal was to develop the software programs that would transform the sensor data into usable information for athletes.

Carl Morrissey '09
Ed Laine, Associate Professor, Department of Geology

Carl worked with Ed to develop a web site for the Bowdoin Buoy Facility.   He focused on the educational aspects of the web site and helped to prepare materials about the buoy to be used in Geology/Environmental Studies 103 and Geology/Environmental Studies 267.   The web site enabled Ed to introduce new materials about harmful algal blooms into his courses and focus on the content more effectively in an interdisciplinary context.

Nate Morrow '10
Susan Wegner, Associate Professor, Department of Art History
Katy Kline, Director, Museum of Art

Nate worked with Susan and Katy to develop online interactive programming to accompany the Museum of Art's exhibit, Beauty and Duty: The Art and Business of Renaissance Marriage , which opened in March 2008.   With their guidance, he designed and implemented web activities aimed at different audiences, including K-12 students, teachers, and Bowdoin students.

David Thompson '08
Patrick Rael, Associate Professor, Department of History
Richard Lindemann, Director, Special Collections and Archives, Library

David worked with Patrick Rael and Richard Lindemann to research and develop content for the Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain Digital Archive.

Allison Weide '08
Anne Henshaw, Director, Coastal Studies Center and Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology

Allison worked with Anne to develop interactive web-based mapping of Inuit place names and travel routes on southwest Baffin Island, Canada.   She created a web interface that integrated GIS vector data (polylines and polygons) from the place name project together with associated attributes so that a user can work with the information in an interactive way. The primary objective was to code that data so that one could scroll over the screen to see which routes are used during the summer versus winter.

Summer 2006

Thomas Duffy '07
Peter Lea, Associate Professor of Geology, Department of Geology

Tom worked with Peter to develop materials for an upcoming glacial geology course (Geology 282) using Google Earth. He provided examples of different glacial features around the world using Google Earth satellite and aerial imagery, integrated additional materials (e.g., field photographs, graphs of data) into Google Earth to create virtual field trips, and created self-quizzes based upon Google Earth images and data.

Brendan Mortimer '06
Scott Sehon, Professor of Philosophy, Department of Philosophy

Each fall semester, Scott teaches Philosophy 223, a course on symbolic logic.   In this course, students learn to use a natural deduction system for quantificational logic. They learn a formal way to show that one formula implies another.   The system is natural in that it is intended to mimic informal or natural ways of reasoning.   Each line of the deduction must cite one of about 10 rules.   Brendan worked with Scott to create a computer application to help students master the deduction system.

Mark Viehman '07
Patrick Rael, Associate Professor of History, Department of History

Mark continued gathering data and creating GIS maps for Patrick Rael's historical census data project. Since Fall 2003, Patrick has been acquiring historical datasets containing information from the federal decennial censuses (1790-1920) that students in his 200-level courses manipulate and then plot using ArcGIS. Mark's summer tasks included improving the data that currently exists by correcting it, supplementing it, and adding new variables.   In addition, he worked with Patrick to prepare materials for a new course in quantitative history.

Lowell Walker '07
John Lichter, Assistant Professor of Biology and Environmental Studies, Department of Biology
Matt Klingle, Assistant Professor of History and Environmental Studies, Department of History

Lowell worked on two projects utilizing GIS.   He contributed to the GIS database for Merrymeeting Bay by developing a GIS layer of rare and threatened plant species in Merrymeeting Bay and its tidal tributaries.   In addition, he acquired and georeferenced historical maps of the area.   Both projects contributed to the Merrymeeting Bay area GIS database.

Greg Wyka '08
Ed Laine, Associate Professor of Geology, Department of Geology

Greg worked with Ed to create a detailed bathymetric map of Harpswell Sound to track a new oceanographic buoy that is adjacent to the Coastal Studies Center. The Bowdoin Buoy Facility (BBF) has a dozen sensors at various depths reporting on meteorology, currents, chemistry, and biology real time 24/7. It was used as a focus in Introduction to Marine Environmental Geology and Marine Geology in Fall 2006 and in Coastal Oceanography in Spring 2007.

Summer 2005

Emma Bonanomi '05
Genevieve Lemoine, Curator/Registrar, Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum

Emma Bonanomi worked with Genny LeMoine and other Arctic Musem staff to curate an   pcoming exhibit, This Extraordinary Paradise: Life in Northwest Greenland. Specifically, the project proposed to develop audio-tours using Apple iPods to deliver multimedia content (images and audio) to supplement the exhibit. Emma scanned images, wrote text, and programmed the iPods with the exhibit content.

Adam Cohen-Leadholm '07
Vineet Shende, Assistant Professor of Music, Department of Music

Vineet Shende spent the summer completing three compositions - a large multi-movement work, a smaller orchestral work, and a multi-movement work for a chamber ensemble. Adam, who is a music major with a special interest in composition used Finale, a notational program to extract and format these musical compositions as well as create a vocal-piano reduction for the multi-movement orchestral work.   In addition, he used Finale to work on his own compositions with Vineet's guidance., which helped him learn more about this complicated program.

Karen Fossum '07
Pamela Fletcher, Assistant Professor of Art History, Department of Art History

Karen worked with Pamela Fletcher to develop a GIS-based curriculum for Art History 357: The Commercial Art Gallery, an advanced seminar. Specifically, the project attempted to map art galleries in New York and London in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. By mapping the geography of the commercial gallery, they explored many questions about art galleries and their historical development.

Gillian Garratt-Reed '07
Ed Laine, Associate Professor of Geology, Department of Geology

Gillian worked with Ed Laine to create an oceanographic database for use in future introductory, intermediate, and advanced courses, as well as faculty and student research. The project included evaluating oceanographic water quality data collected in Casco Bay over the past five years. Gillian gathered metadata and analyzed whether certain data would be included in the database. In addition, she used Ocean Data View, a software package for interactive exploration, analysis, and visualization of the oceanographic data.

Julia Ledewitz '08
John Lichter, Assistant Professor of Biology and Environmental Studies, Department of Biology
Matt Klingle, Assistant Professor of History and Environmental Studies, Department of History

Julia worked with John Lichter and Matt Klingle to examine the role of historical maps in understanding the ecology of Merrymeeting Bay. The project required researching available historical maps and converting the information into scanned images and digital files. Julia conducted that work as well as develop GIS datasets that will be used by faculty and students in Environmental Studies 394: Ecology of Merrymeeting Bay and Environmental Studies 203: Environment and Culture in North American History.

Maxwell Tyler '07
Peter Lea, Associate Professor of Geology, Department of Geology

The Merrymeeting Bay (MMB) project involves both interdisciplinary teaching and research in geology, biology, environmental studies, archeology and history. Max assisted in the development of IT resources for the project, including (1) data collection and processing to construct a bathymetric map of MMB, and (2) development of Geographical Information System (GIS) maps and coverages to make research and monitoring results accessible on the web. Max utilized and synthesized data and information from diverse scientific instruments (notably acoustic-doppler current profiler, Campbell Scientific dataloggers and probes, YSI multi-parameter sonde) with Global Positioning System data and GIS within the evolving MMB database.

David Willner '06
Patrick Rael, Associate Professor of History, Department of History

David continued gathering data and creating GIS maps for Patrick Rael's historical census data project. Since Fall 2003, Patrick has been acquiring historical datasets containing information from the federal decennial censuses (1790-1920) that students in his 200-level courses manipulate and then plot using ArcGIS. David's summer's tasks included improving the data that currently exists by correcting it, supplementing it, and adding new variables.

Daniel Yingst '07
Tom Conlan, Associate Professor of History and Asian Studies, Department of History and Asian Studies Program

Daniel worked with Tom Conlan to enhance the Scrolls of the Mongol Invasions of Japan web site. Specifically, he created an interactive map and timeline to show the progression of the Mongols during the invasions, both geographically and chronologically. He also used his programming skills to optimize the performance and maintenance of the site and enable easier creation of additional teaching materials and content.

Summer 2004

Christina Lynn Furick '04
Clifton Olds, Edith Cleaves Barry Professor of the History and Criticism of Art, Emeritus, Department of Art History
Carey Phillips, Professor, Department of Biology

The Zen Gardens project received a grant from the NEA to enhance it by creating virtual gardens for users to visit.  Lynn created 3-D models of trees, rocks, and other Japanese garden elements.

Molly Juhlin '05
De-nin Lee, Assistant Professor, Department of Art History and Asian Studies Program

The Chinese scrolls project used the same framework as Tom Conlan's Mongol Scrolls project.   Molly spent the summer scanning and manipulating images for this project that De-nin Lee used in her first-year seminar, Stories and Scrolls in Fall 2004.

Sarah Scott '07
James Higginbotham, Associate Professor, Department of Classics

Sarah spent the summer populating the Classics database with images of Mediterranean artifacts and sites, but worked most specifically to edit and improve the existing content.

Matthew Spooner '05
Patrick Rael, Associate Professor, Department of History
Anne Henshaw, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology-Anthropology and Coastal Studies Center

Both projects required extensive use of GIS (Geographic Information Systems) and shared Matthew, who applied his newly acquired GIS knowledge to help Patrick and Anne create materials for their Fall 2004 courses.

Ella Thodal '05
Adam Levy, Professor, Department of Mathematics

This Webmathematica math project enabled Adam to create problem sets to help his students visualize various algorithms and formulas without having to do a lot of programming.   Ella spent the summer creating problem sets and preparing them for Adam's Optimization course.

Will Voinot-Baron '07
Ed Laine, Associate Professor, Department of Earth and Oceanographic Science

This project entailed making a bathymetric map of Quahog Bay.   Will spent about two weeks on a boat in Quahog Bay gathering bathymetric profiles.   He then spent the rest of his summer editing the data and creating contour maps for Ed to use in his courses and student research.

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