Fall 2012

012. Utopia: Intentional Communities in America, 1630–1997
Sarah McMahon M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25 CT-16 Harrison McCann
An examination of the evolution of utopian visions and utopian experiments that begins in 1630 with John Winthrop's "City upon a Hill," explores the proliferation of both religious and secular communal ventures between 1780 and 1920, and concludes with an examination of twentieth-century counterculture communes, intentional communities, and dystopian separatists. Readings include primary source accounts by members (letters, diaries, essays, etc.), "community" histories and apostate exposés, utopian fiction, and scholarly historical analyses. Discussions and essays focus on teaching students how to subject primary and secondary source materials to critical analysis.

018. New Worlds, New Goods: Consumerism in Early Modern Europe
Meghan Roberts M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25 Hubbard-22
Examines the social, cultural, and political dimensions of consumerism in the early modern Atlantic world, from the discovery of the New World through the French Revolution. Considers how material objects like tulips, coffee, clothing, and furniture provide a lens through which we can study topics such as imperialism, gender, class, and national identity.

020. In Sickness and in Health: Public Health in Europe and the United States
Susan Tananbaum T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Buck Center-211
Introduces a variety of historical perspectives on illness and health. Considers the development of scientific knowledge, and the social, political, and economic forces that have influenced public health policy. Topics include epidemics, maternal and child welfare, AIDS, and national health care.

026. Globalizing India
Rachel Sturman M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55 The Hazelton Room (Kanbar 109)
Interrogates contemporary globalization by examining how Indians have interacted with and been shaped by the broader world, with a focus on the last two centuries. Topics include the place of India in the European imagination and vice versa; India’s role in the rise of modern global capitalism and imperialism; and the distinctive features of contemporary globalization.

027. The Sexual Life of Colonialism: Gender and Sexuality in the Colonial World
Durba Mitra T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55 Chase Barn Chamber
Explores histories of state control of sexuality and intimacy in the non-Western world in the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. Addresses different forms of sexuality including interracial relationships between colonizers and the colonized, queer and same-sex desires, sexual outcasts like prostitutes, and the lives of transgender individuals. Readings cover histories of gender and sexuality in the Arab-Islamic world, colonial South Asia, and colonial sub-Saharan Africa.

125. Entering Modernity: European Jewry
Susan Tananbaum T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25 Searles-215
Explores Jewish life through the lenses of history, religion, and ethnicity and examines the processes by which governments and sections of the Jewish community attempted to incorporate Jews and Judaism into European society. Surveys social and economic transformations of Jews, cultural challenges of modernity, varieties of modern Jewish religious expression, political ideologies, the Holocaust, establishment of Israel, and American Jewry through primary and secondary sources, lectures, films, and class discussions.

139. The Civil War Era
Patrick Rael M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 Cleaveland-151
Examines the coming of the Civil War and the war itself in all its aspects. Considers the impact of changes in American society, the sectional crisis and breakdown of the party system, the practice of Civil War warfare, and social ramifications of the conflict. Includes readings of novels and viewing of films. Students are expected to enter with a basic knowledge of American history, and a commitment to participating in large class discussions.

200. Beyond Capoeira: History and Politics of Afro-Brazilian Culture
Laura Premack M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55 Searles-127
Seminar. Brazil has the largest population of African descent outside Africa. Nowadays, Brazilians pride themselves on their country’s unique racial and cultural heritage, but it hasn’t always been this way. For centuries, many Afro-Brazilian practices were illegal. Now, however, we are in the midst of what might be called an Afro-Brazilian renaissance. This is something to be celebrated, but it is also something to be questioned. Do these efforts to delineate, praise, and preserve Afro-Brazilian culture actually limit our understanding of it? Has labeling certain aspects of Brazilian cultural heritage as African created a situation in which other ways that Africa has influenced Brazil are overlooked? Just what do we mean by “African” and “Brazilian” anyhow? Takes a historical and anthropological approach to these and other related questions.

202. Ancient Rome
Robert Sobak M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55 Druckenmiller-016
Surveys the history of Rome from its beginnings to the fourth century A.D. Considers the political, economic, religious, social, and cultural developments of the Romans in the context of Rome’s growth from a small settlement in central Italy to the dominant power in the Mediterranean world. Special attention is given to such topics as urbanism, imperialism, the influence of Greek culture and law, and multiculturalism. Introduces different types of sources—literary, epigraphical, archaeological, etc.—for use as historical documents. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors.

207. Food and Power in American History
Tom Okie M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25 Mass Hall-McKeen Study
Seminar. The social, cultural, and environmental history of food production and consumption in America since the colonial era, with a focus on the rise of the “industrial” food system in the twentieth century. Topics include class/gender/race in rural landscapes, hunters and poachers, freshness, institutional and convenience foods, the Green Revolution, and the organic and local food movements.

215. The Paradox of Progress: Europe and the Experience of Modernity, 1815-1918
Kimberly Herrlinger M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55 Adams-406
Survey course of the “long nineteenth century” in Europe, from 1815 to the end of the First World War, with an emphasis on the social, cultural, and political impact of industrial and technological “progress.” Explores the way people lived and thought about the world around them as Europe industrialized, as well as the ambivalence that many Europeans came to attach to “modernity” by the end of the Great War in 1918.

227. City and Landscape in Modern Europe
Jill Pearlman M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 Buck Center-211
Explores the evolution of the built environment in London, Paris, Vienna, and Berlin from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Focusing on significant moments in the history of these cities, considers a variety of factors as determinants of urban form, including technological developments, industrialization, politics, economics, culture and design. Topics include the creation of capital cities, natural and public spaces, streets, housing, suburbanization, environmental problems, and current schemes for a sustainable urbanism.

230. Dictatorship, Human Rights, and Memory in Latin America
Elizabeth Shesko T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 Pols House-Conf Room
Seminar. Examines the military dictatorships that ruled Latin American countries from the mid-1950s to the 1980s, the movements for democracy that toppled them, and efforts to reckon with their aftermath. Topics include internal and external support for the regimes, the role of truth commissions, the prosecution of human rights violations, and the challenges of writing the history of dictatorship. Considers the cases studies of Guatemala, Argentina, Chile, and Brazil through primary sources and recent scholarship. Taught at both the 200 level and the 300 level. Students at both levels attend the same class sessions; students enrolled in the 300-level course complete a substantial research paper.

239. Comparative Slavery and Emancipation
Patrick Rael T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55 Adams-114
Seminar. Examines slavery as a labor system and its relationship to the following: the emergence of market economies, definitions of race attendant to European commercial expansion, the cultures of Africans in the diaspora, slave control and resistance, free black people and the social structure of New World slave societies, and emancipation and its aftermath. Spends some time considering how historians have understood these crucial issues. Non-majors invited.

248. Family and Community in American History, 1600-1900
Sarah McMahon T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55 Sills-205
Examines the social, economic, and cultural history of American families from 1600 to 1900, and the changing relationship between families and their kinship networks, communities, and the larger society. Topics include gender relationships; racial, ethnic, cultural, and class variations in family and community ideals, structures, and functions; the purpose and expectations of marriage; philosophies of child-rearing; organization of work and leisure time; and the effects of industrialization, urbanization, immigration, and social and geographic mobility on patterns of family life and community organization.

252. Colonial Latin America
Elizabeth Shesko T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Sills-111
Introduces students to the history of Latin America from pre-Columbian times to about 1825. Traces developments fundamental to the establishment of colonial rule, drawing out regional comparisons of indigenous resistance and accommodation. Topics include the nature of indigenous societies encountered by Europeans; exploitation of African and Indian labor; evangelization and the role of the church; the evolution of race, gender, and class hierarchies in colonial society; and the origins of independence in Spanish America and Brazil. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors.

257. Age of Reform: The Long Progressive Movement in U.S. History 1890-1940
Tom Okie M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25 Buck Center-211
Investigates the history of reform in the United States. Examines episodes from the late nineteenth-century farmers’ and workers’ movements through the New Deal reforms of the 1930s, but focuses on the so-called “progressive movement” around the turn of the century, including urban reform, the social gospel, conservation and rural development, segregation and eugenics, and progressive politics.

261. The Making of Modern India
Rachel Sturman M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 Sills-109
Traces the history of India from the rise of British imperial power in the mid-eighteenth century to the present. Topics include the formation of a colonial economy and society; religious and social reform; the emergence of anti-colonial nationalism; the road to independence and partition; and issues of secularism, democracy, and inequality that have shaped post-colonial Indian society.

265. Mogadishu to Madagascar: East African History
David Gordon T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25 Hubbard-22
Examines the history of East Africa with a special focus on the interactions between east Africans and the Indian Ocean World. Considers African societies prior to Portuguese conquest, continues through Omani colonialism, and the spread of slavery across East Africa and the Indian Ocean islands of Madagascar and Mauritius; the onset of British, Italian, and German colonialism, rebellions against colonialism including Mau Mau in Kenya, and post-colonial conflicts including the Zanzibar revolution of 1964; the rise of independent Tanzania, Kenya, Mozambique, Madagascar, and Somalia, and challenges to their sovereignty by present-day Indian Ocean rebels, such as the Somali pirates.

271. Culture Wars in the Age of Enlightenment
Meghan Roberts M 8:00 - 9:25, W 8:00 - 9:25 Sills-109
Examines a series of intellectual, political, and cultural feuds in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Europe, the so-called “Age of Enlightenment” during which thinkers aspired to implement sweeping changes in politics and society. Topics include the debate over who had the right to engage in intellectual work, the rise of atheistic thinking and the efforts of religious groups to combat it, the development of new scientific methods, and discussions of government, gender, and race. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors.

272. Warlords and Child Soldiers in African History
David Gordon T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Mass Hall-Faculty Room
Seminar. Examines how gender, age, religion, and race have informed ideologies of violence by considering various historical incarnations of the African warrior across modern history, including the military slave, the mercenary, the revolutionary, the warlord, the religious warrior, and the child soldier. Analyzes the nature of warfare in modern African history and how fighters, followers, African civilians, and the international community have imagined the “work of war” in Africa. Readings include scholarly analyses of warfare, warriors, and warrior ideals alongside memoirs and fictional representations.

275. History of China I: Antiquity and Late Antiquity (2000 B.C.E. to 800 C.E.)
Leah Zuo M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 Searles-313
First installment of a three-part introduction to Chinese history. Explores the origins and foundations of Chinese civilization. Prominent themes include the inception of the imperial system, the intellectual fluorescence in classical China, the introduction and assimilation of Buddhism, the development of Chinese cosmology, and the interactions between early China and neighboring regions. Class discussion of historical writings complemented with literary works and selected pieces of the visual arts. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors.

276. The Classical Roots of Chinese Thought
Leah Zuo M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55 Boody-Johnson Seminar Room
Seminar. Addresses Chinese thought from the time of Confucius, ca. sixth century B.C.E., up to the beginning of the Common Era. The first half of the time period nurtured many renowned thinkers, who devoted themselves to the task of defining and disseminating ideas. The latter half witnessed the canonization of a number of significant traditions, including Confucianism. Major problems that preoccupied the thinkers include order and chaos, human nature, the relationship between man and nature, among others. Students instructed to treat philosophical ideas as historically conditioned constructs and to interrogate them in contexts. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors.

281. The Courtly Society of Heian Japan
Thomas Conlan M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25 HL-311 (third floor)
Seminar. Japan’s courtly culture spawned some of the greatest cultural achievements the world has ever known. Using the Tale of Genji, a tenth-century novel of romance and intrigue, attempts to reconstruct the complex world of courtly culture in Japan, where marriages were open and easy, even though social mobility was not; and where the greatest elegance, and most base violence, existed in tandem. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors.

283. The Origins of Japanese Culture and Civilization
Thomas Conlan T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Sills-109
How do a culture, a state, and a society develop? Designed to introduce the culture and history of Japan by exploring how “Japan” came into existence, and to chart how patterns of Japanese civilization shifted through time. Attempts to reconstruct the tenor of life through translations of primary sources, and to lead to a greater appreciation of the unique and lasting cultural and political monuments of Japanese civilization. Note: This course fulfills the pre-modern requirement for history majors.

311. Experiments in Totalitarianism: Nazi Germany and Soviet Russia
Kimberly Herrlinger T 1:00 - 3:55 Mass Hall-McKeen Study
Compares and contrasts the nature of society and culture under two of the twentieth century’s most “totalitarian” regimes—fascism under the Nazis in Germany, and socialism under the Bolsheviks in the Soviet Union. Prior course work in either modern Germany or Russia is strongly recommended, and students may focus their research project on either country, or a comparison of both.

337. Nature and Health in America
Matthew Klingle M 9:30 - 12:25 Searles-115
Explores relationships between humans, environment, and health in North American history from the sixteenth century to the present day. Topics may include the evolution of public health, biomedical research, and clinical practice; folk remedies and popular understandings of health; infectious and chronic diseases; links between landscape, health, and inequality; gender and reproductive health; occupational health and safety; the effects of agriculture, industrialization, and urbanization on human and ecological health; state and federal policies; and the colonial and global dimensions of public health and medicine. Students write a major research paper based on primary sources. Environmental Studies 101, 203, and at least one 200-level history course recommended.

366. Dictatorship, Human Rights, and Memory in Latin America
Elizabeth Shesko T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 Pols House-Conf Room
Seminar. Examines the military dictatorships that ruled Latin American countries from the mid-1950s to the 1980s, the movements for democracy that toppled them, and efforts to reckon with their aftermath. Topics include internal and external support for the regimes, the role of truth commissions, the prosecution of human rights violations, and the challenges of writing the history of dictatorship. Considers the cases studies of Guatemala, Argentina, Chile, and Brazil through primary sources and recent scholarship. Taught at both the 200 level and the 300 level. Students at both levels attend the same class sessions; students enrolled in the 300-level course complete a substantial research paper.