Upcoming Events

Francophone Film Festival - 'In The House' (Dans La Maison)

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April 2, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

A sixteen-year-old boy insinuates himself into the house of a fellow student from his literature class and writes about it in essays for his French teacher. Faced with this gifted and unusual pupil, the teacher rediscovers his enthusiasm for his work, but the boy's intrusion will unleash a series of uncontrollable events. 

Directed by Francois Ozon and based on the play The Boy in the Last Row by Juan Mayorga, the film was awarded the main prize at the 2012 San Sebastian International Film Festival, the Golden Shell, as well as the Jury Prize for Best Screenplay.

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Francophone Film Festival: 'Ernest and Celestine'

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April 3, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

There is a world of where the bears live above ground in their cities and the rodents live below in in their underground ones in mutual fear and hate. Ernest, a bear, and Celestine, a mouse, must stand up for their love in the face of bigotry and achieve the impossible.

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Francophone Film Festival: 'Ernest and Celestine' (Children's Matinee)

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April 4, 2015 10:00 AM  – 12:00 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

There is a world of where the Bears live above ground in their cities and the rodents live below in in their underground ones in mutual fear and hate. However, Celestine, an apprentice mouse dentist, finds at least momentary common cause with Ernest, a poor street Bear musician, that gets them rejected from both their respective worlds. Even in the face of misfortune, the exiles find a growing friendship between themselves as their respective talents flower because of it. 


Yet despite this, their quietly profound challenge to the founding prejudices of their worlds cannot be ignored as the authorities track them down. When that happens, Ernest and Celestine must stand up for their love in the face of such bigotry and achieve the impossible.

Based on a series of children's books of the same name, the film was selected to be screened in the Directors' Fortnight section at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival, as part of the TIFF Kids programme at the 2012 Toronto International Film Festival, and at the 2013 Hong Kong International Film Festival. It was selected for the grand competition at feature film edition of the 2013 World festival of animated film Animafest Zagreb and was screened as the opening film. The film received widespread critical acclaim, and became the first animated film to win the Magritte Award for Best Film.

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Noliwe Rooks: "Because What is Beautiful is Good: Erasing Race and Selling Feminism in the Dove Campaign for Real Beauty"

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April 6, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

This talk explores the role that Black women played at the beginning and the end of the first international Dove brand "real beauty" campaign and how and why that campaign used feminism as an advertising tool.

Noliwe Rooks is currently an Associate Professor in Africana Studies and Feminist, Gender, Sexuality Studies at Cornell University where she is also the Director of Graduate Studies in Africana Studies. She is an interdisciplinary scholar whose work explores the racial implications of beauty, fashion and adornment as well as the way race and gender both impact and are impacted by popular culture, social history and political life in the United States.

Rooks is the author of three books. The first, Hair Raising: Beauty, Culture and African American Women (1996, Rutgers University Press) won both the 1997 Choice Award for Outstanding Academic Book, and the Public Library Associations 1997 award for Outstanding University Press Book. Her second book, Ladies Pages: African American Women's Magazines and the Culture that Made Them (Rutgers University Press) was published in 2004. Her most recent book, White Money/Black Power: African American Studies and the Crises of Race in Higher Education was published in 2006 with Beacon Press.

She has two forthcoming edited collections: "Black Fashion: Gender. Art. Politics" a special issue of NKA: Journal of Contemporary Art, Duke University Press, Fall 2015, No. 37 and Women and Magazines in the 21st Century: Race, Writing and New Media (Under Consideration). Her current book project is about the politics of race and economics of K-12 education in the United States and tentatively titled, Apartheid in America and Why it Matters That We Have Reached the Beginning of the End of Public Education.

Open to the public free of charge.

For more information, contact Hanetha Vete-Congolo at mvete@bowdoin.edu.

Sponsored by the Andrew Mellon Foundation (Mellon Humanities Initiative).

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Akram Belkaid: "The Arab Spring Four Years After: A Failure or the Beginning of a Transition?"

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April 8, 2015 7:30 PM  – 9:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

In 2011, several Arab peoples rose up against their dictatorial or authoritarian regimes. From Tunisia to Bahrain via Egypt, Yemen or Syria, the same slogans mobilized the masses: freedom and dignity but also bread and employment. "The people want the fall of the regime" was the now famous slogan adopted by protesters committed to ending decades of deprivation of their most basic rights, among them "the right to rights." This shock wave brought down regimes or forced leaders to leave power (Tunisia, Egypt). It obliged many others to open their purse strings to buy social peace (The Gulf monarchies, Algeria). Four years after this unexpected dislocation, the debate is far from over regarding the real and structural outcome of the so-called "Arab Spring." After a quick reminder of the events of 2011, this presentation addresses the following points:

- Should the Arab Spring be considered a failure in light of the dramatic situation experienced by countries like Syria, Libya or Yemen? Or, would it be more appropriate to see it as a long-term transition?

- What are the prospects for the two countries where the Arab Spring began? Tunisia is an exception with its democratic, but fragile, experiment while Egypt has returned to authoritarianism and violence.

- Is the rise of ISIS a consequence of the Arab Spring? How will the Arab world face the extremist threat in the coming years in a context of a rising terrorism and a weakening of states?

Akram Belkaid, born in Algeria, is a journalist and a writer. He lives in France and works for Le Monde Diplomatique, a monthly magazine specialized in geostrategic issues. He is also a columnist with Le Quotidien d'Oran in Algeria and he has published several books about the Arab world, among them: Being Arab Today (Etre arabe aujourd'hui, carnetsnord, Paris, 2011) and Back to Algeria (Retours en Algerie, carnetsnord, Paris, 2013).

This event is free and open to the public.

Sponsored by the Departments of Romance Languages, Government and Legal Studies, and Religion.

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