Location: Bowdoin / Susan Taffe Reed

Music

Susan M. Taffe Reed

CFD Postdoctoral Fellow in Music

Contact Information

staffere@bowdoin.edu
207-725-3551
Music
107 Gibson Hall



Spring 2014

  • American Indian Powwow Culture (MUS 3260)


Susan Taffe Reed

Education

  • Ph.D. Cornell University, Musicology/American Indian Studies (minor)
  • M.A. Cornell University, Musicology/American Indian Studies (minor)
  • B.A. Colgate University, Music/Native American Studies, magna cum laude





Susan Taffe Reed is an interdisciplinary scholar whose work navigates in and between the fields of Ethnomusicology and American Indian Studies, as she shapes a holistic approach to understanding the interconnectivity of music and Native life, past and present.  Her current research focuses on music and dance in relation to continuity and change, language, kinship, complementarity, and pathways to revitalization. 

Dr. Taffe Reed is currently a Consortium for Faculty Diversity Postdoctoral Fellow in the Music Department.  Prior to coming to Bowdoin, she was a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Department of Music at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

She is the recipient of numerous awards and grants, including the Donald J. Grout Memorial Prize for outstanding Ph.D. dissertation, Hewitt Pantaleoni Prize, T. Temple Tuttle Prize, David L. Call Achievement Award, several Grout Fund grants, and the Mario St. George Boiardi Scholarship.  This year she was awarded the Blanton Owen Fund Award from the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress, which contributed to supporting fieldwork for her manuscript-in-progress, Innovating Tradition: Powwows in Appalachian Pennsylvania, which is under advance contract with Ohio University Press for the series in Race, Ethnicity, and Gender in Appalachia.  Through ethnographic interviews, Dr. Taffe Reed is documenting the significant role that music and dance play in the social, spiritual, and political dimensions of powwows.  She is also revising and editing her manuscript, Complementarity in Lunaapeewak (Delaware Indian) Music and Dance, for book publication.    

Her publications have appeared in the peer-reviewed journal Ethnomusicology Review and in the edited volumes Native Americans in the Susquehanna River Valley, Past and Present and The Encyclopedia of American Indian Issues Today.  She recently served as an article referee for the Journal of the Society for American Music.   

Dr. Taffe Reed presents her work to the international academic community at conferences in the United States and abroad.  She has delivered papers at meetings of the Society for Ethnomusicology (as well as chapter meetings of the Niagara and Mid Atlantic chapters of the Society for Ethnomusicology), British Forum for Ethnomusicology, New York State-St. Lawrence Chapter of the American Musicological Society, Appalachian Studies Association, and the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association.

As an educator, she has three core outreach missions: 1) fostering intellectual diversity in higher education; 2) educating the public about Native America’s rich and vibrant culture through music; 3) cultivating positive relationships between Indigenous communities and academe. 

Dr. Taffe Reed has a deep love for the Endless Mountains region of Northeastern Pennsylvania, where she grew up with rich ties to her Delaware (Turtle Clan), German, and Irish roots.  Because of her personal background, she is especially dedicated to mentoring Indigenous and rural college students.  In addition to having learned Native American flute, drum, and singing traditions, she is a classical pianist and soprano who has studied and performed in classical, jazz, blues, and popular styles.  She is a student of the Lunaapeewiixsihtiit Sheshkoolhaaluweesak Eehakehkiingeewaniikaan (The Lunaape Speakers Teachers Academy) and is active in Munsee Delaware language revitalization.  She regularly attends powwows and is a Southern Buckskin traditional dancer.  Since coming to Bowdoin, she has been enjoying life on the sea.

2013 “Kiiloona Ktaaptoonehna: Munsee Delaware Language Revitalization on the Susquehanna’s North Branch.” In Native Americans in the Susquehanna River Valley, Past and Present, edited by Dave Minderhout. Stories of the Susquehanna Valley Series. Lewisburg, PA: Bucknell University Press.Advance contract.       Innovating Tradition: Powwows in Appalachian Pennsylvania.  Race, Ethnicity, and Gender in Appalachia Series.  Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press. 

Forthcoming.   “Pootaatiikanush (Delaware Flute).”  In The New Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments, Second Edition, edited by J. Richard Haefer Glen Jacobs, Munsee language collaborator.  London: Macmillan Press.

Forthcoming.   “Powuniikan (Delaware Drum).”  In The New Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments, Second Edition, edited by J. Richard Haefer Glen Jacobs, Munsee language collaborator.  London: Macmillan Press.

Forthcoming.   “Shohwuniikan (Delaware Rattle).”  In The New Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments, Second Edition, edited by J. Richard Haefer Glen Jacobs, Munsee language collaborator.  London: Macmillan Press.

2013 “Music: Vibrant Elements of American Indian Culture.” In Encyclopedia of American Indian Issues Today, Vol. 2, edited by Russell M. Lawson. Oxford, England: Greenwood Press.2013    “Kiiloona Ktaaptoonehna: Munsee Delaware Language Revitalization on the Susquehanna’s North Branch.”  In Native Americans in the Susquehanna River Valley, Past and Present, edited by Dave Minderhout.  Stories of the Susquehanna Valley Series.  Lewisburg, PA: Bucknell University Press.

2013    “Music: Vibrant Elements of American Indian Culture.”  In Encyclopedia of American Indian Issues Today, Vol. 2, edited by Russell M. Lawson.  Oxford, England: Greenwood Press. 

2012    “Colonization’s Chain: Tracing the Links that Bond Communities Through the Delaware Skin Dance.”  Ethnomusicology Review, Vol. 16.