David Carlon

Associate Professor of Biology, Director of the Bowdoin College Coastal Studies Center

Teaching this semester

BIOL 2232 / ENVS 2232. Benthic Ecology

David Carlon Sarah Kingston Bobbie Lyon
The principles of ecology emphasizing the hard- and soft-bottom communities of Casco Bay and Harpswell Sound. Field trips and field exercises demonstrate the quantitative principles of marine ecological research, including good practices in sampling designs and field experiments. A class field project designs and implements a long-term study, based at the Bowdoin Marine Laboratory, to monitor and detect changes in community structure driven by climate change in the twenty-first century. Assumes a basic knowledge of biological statistics. Taught in residence at the Bowdoin Marine Laboratory, Biology 2232/Environmental Studies 2232 is a course-module in the Bowdoin Marine Science Semester. Biology 2501 (same as Environmental Studies 2231), Biology 2330 (same as Environmental Studies 2233), and History 2129 (same as Environmental Studies 2449) are co-requisites of this course.

BIOL 2330 / ENVS 2233. Marine Molecular Ecology and Evolution

David Carlon Sarah Kingston Bobbie Lyon
Features the application of molecular data to ecological and evolutionary problems in the sea. Hands on laboratory work will introduce students to sampling, generation, and analysis of molecular data sets with Sanger-based technology and Next Generation Sequencing. Lectures, discussions, and computer-based simulations will demonstrate the relevant theoretical principles of population genetics and phylogenetics. A class project will begin a long-term sampling program that uses DNA barcoding to understand temporal and spatial change in the ocean. Taught in residence at the Bowdoin Marine Laboratory, Biology 2330/Environmental Studies 2233 is a course-module in the Bowdoin Marine Science Semester. Biology 2232 (same as Environmental Studies 2232), Biology 2501 (same as Environmental Studies 2231), and History 2129 (same as Environmental Studies 2449) are co-requisites of this course.

BIOL 2501 / ENVS 2231. Biological Oceanography

David Carlon Sarah Kingston Bobbie Lyon
Features classroom, laboratory, and fieldwork emphasizing fundamental biological processes operating in pelagic environments. It includes a hybrid of topics traditionally taught in physical and biological oceanography courses: major ocean current systems, physical structure of the water column, patterns and process of primary production, structure and function of pelagic food webs. Field trips to Casco Bay and Harpswell Sound will introduce students to the methods and data structures of biological oceanography. Taught in residence at the Bowdoin Marine Laboratory, Biology 2501/Environmental Studies 2231 is a course-module in the Bowdoin Marine Science Semester. Biology 2232 (same as Environmental Studies 2232), Biology 2330 (same as Environmental Studies 2233), and History 2129 (same as Environmental Studies 2449) are co-requisites of this course.

HIST 2129 / ENVS 2449. History of Harpswell and the Coast of Maine

Sarah McMahon David Carlon
Examines the long history of Harpswell as part of the coast of Maine, and the research methodologies used to uncover and analyze that history from environmental, community, socioeconomic, political, racial and ethnic, and cultural perspectives. Topics include bonds and tensions in a peninsula and islands community; coastal agriculture and stone walls; inshore and deep-sea fisheries; shipbuilding and shipping; the Civil War; ethnic, religious, and cultural diversity; poverty and living on the margin; and the rise of tourism. Culminates with an individual research project prospectus for a projected essay on an aspect of that history. . Taught in residence at the Bowdoin Coastal Studies Center. History 2129/Environmental Studies 2449 is a course-module in the Bowdoin Marine Science Semester. Biology 2501(same as Environmental Studies 2231), Biology 2330 (same as Environmental Studies 2233), and Biology 2232 (same as Environmental Studies 2232) are co-requisites of this course.

I am an an evolutionary biologist primarily interested in micro-evolution. I have an inordinate fondness for marine organisms, but have dabbled in some intriguing terrestrial systems, including the Hawaiian flycatcher radiation. My research has drawn on a variety of methods, but the approach and tools of Molecular Ecology unites ongoing work in my lab.

Education

  • B.A., Boston University
  • M.S., University of Massachusetts-Boston
  • Ph.D., University of New Hampshire

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