Spring 2015 Calendar of Events

Allison Cooper, Crystal Hall, and Ann Kibbie present: "Digital Humanities Projects in the Classroom: Three Case Studies"

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January 28, 2015 12:00 PM  – 1:00 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

FACULTY SEMINAR SERIES

Allison Cooper, Assistant Professor of Romance Languages and Cinema Studies, Crystal Hall, Visiting Assistant Professor in the Digital Humanities, and Ann Kibbie, Associate Professor of English are the featured speakers.  The title of their talk is: "Digital Humanities Projects in the Classroom: Three Case Studies."

Open to faculty and staff.
Buffet lunch $3, or bring your own lunch.

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CANCELLED: James Joyce's Birthday

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February 2, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

This event scheduled for tonight has been cancelled due to inclement weather.

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Evening Discussion with Jill Abramson, Former Executive Editor of 'The New York Times'

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February 4, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Memorial Hall, Pickard Theater

Jill Abramson is a journalist who spent the last 17 years in the most senior editorial positions at The New York Times, where she was the first woman to serve as Washington Bureau Chief, Managing Editor, and Executive Editor. Before joining the Times, she was Deputy Washington Bureau Chief and an investigative reporter covering money and politics at The Wall Street Journal for nine years.

She is the author of three books including Strange Justice, which she wrote with Jane Mayer. Before joining Harvard's English Department as a lecturer teaching non-fiction narrative writing, she taught undergraduate writing seminars at Yale for five years and at Princeton.

Note: This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin’s Live Webcasts page.

Ticket info: Free and open to the public. Tickets are required and are available at the David Saul Smith Union Information desk, 207-725-3375.

Sponsored by: Gender & Women's Studies and the Charles Weston Pickard Lecture Fund.

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Sherryl Vint: "To Seek Out New Worlds: Science Fiction in a Global Perspective"

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February 5, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Sherryl Vint is professor of Science Fiction Media Studies at the University of California, Riverside, where she co-directs the Science Fiction and Technoculture Studies program. She is the author and/or editor of several books, including Bodies of Tomorrow (2007), Animal Alterity (2010), The Wire (2013), Science Fiction: A Guide to the Perplexed (2014), and The Routledge Concise History of Science Fiction (2011, with Mark Bould). She co-edits the journals Science Fiction Film and Television and Science Fiction Studies.

Her talk will present an overview of science fiction in a global context, exploring the ways common science fiction icons appear differently when embedded in multiple local contexts, and will discuss the significance of the recent explosion of science fiction across the globe. 

This event is free and open to the public.  For more information contact Arielle Saiber at asaiber@bowdoin.edu.  

Sponsored by the Departments of Romance Languages and English and the Cinema Studies and Gender and Women's Studies Programs.

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Jill Pearlman presents: "The Spies Who Came into the Modernist Fold: The Covert Life of London's Lawn Road Flats, 1934-42"

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February 10, 2015 12:00 PM  – 1:00 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

FACULTY SEMINAR SERIES

Jill Pearlman, Senior Lecturer in Environmental Studies is the featured speaker. The title of her talk is: "The Spies Who Came into the Modernist Fold: The Covert Life of London's Lawn Road Flats, 1934-42."

Open to faculty and staff.
Buffet lunch $3, or bring your own lunch.

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Bowdoin Friends Book Lecture: Raymond Miller on 'Crime and Punishment'

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February 17, 2015 7:00 PM  – 8:00 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

The Association of Bowdoin Friends is pleased to continue the Book Lecture Series again this Spring! All members of the community are invited to enjoy a good read then experience an analysis of the story from the perspective of a Bowdoin professor.

For this installment, Raymond Miller will explore and discuss Fyodor Dostoyevsky's classic, Crime and Punishment. Renowned as one of the world's greatest novelists and literary psychologists, Dostoyevsky's works grapple with deep political, social, and religious issues while delving into the often tortured psychology of characters whose lives are shaped by these issues.

This is played out in the manner in which the novel addresses crime and punishment; the crime is committed in Part I and the punishment comes hundreds of pages later, in the Epilogue. The real focus is not on those two endpoints but on what lies between them--an in-depth exploration of the psychology of a criminal.

Raymond Miller is a retired associate professor of Russian. There will be opportunity for questions after his lecture.

The event is free and open to the public. Just come, listen, and learn.

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Linda Gradstein: "Do Women Do it Better, or Just Differently: Reflections on 25 Years as a Middle East Journalist"

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February 19, 2015 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Linda Gradstein is a journalist who reports for AOL News and Public Radio International's The World, and writes for the online magazine, Slate. She has covered important events in Israel, the West Bank, and the Gaza Strip, including the intifada, the mass immigration of Soviet immigrants to Israel, the leadership of Yasser Arafat, Hamas in Gaza, the Persian Gulf War, and major elections in Israel.

Gradstein was also the Israel correspondent for NPR News from 1990 until 2009.  She is a member of the team that received the Overseas Press Club award for her coverage of the assassination of Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, as well as the team that received Alfred I. DuPont-Columbia University Award for Excellence in Broadcast Journalism for her coverage of the Persian Gulf War.

Sponsored by Bowdoin Hillel, the Women's Resource Center and Gender and Women's Studies


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CANCELLED - Cristina Malcomson: "Studies of Skin Color in the Early Royal Society"

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February 19, 2015 4:30 PM  – 5:30 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO WEATHER.
For more information, contact the English Department coordinator at 725-3552 or lholland@bowdoin.edu.

In her most recent book, Studies of Skin Color in the Early Royal Society: Boyle, Cavendish, Swift (Ashgate, 2013), Cristina Malcolmson demonstrates how unstable the idea of race remained in England at the end of the seventeenth century, and yet how extensively the intertwined institutions of government, colonialism, the slave trade, and science were collaborating to usher it into public view. Arguing that the early Royal Society moved science toward racialization by giving skin color a new prominence as an object of experiment and observation, Malcolmson provides the first book-length examination of studies of skin color in the society. She also brings new light to the relationship between early modern literature, science, and the establishment of scientific racism in the nineteenth century.

Malcolmson,  professor of English at Bates College, has also written The 'Empire of Man over the Inferior Creatures': British Women, Race, and Seventeenth-Century Science for The Palgrave History of British Women's Writing, and a collaborative article with Ruth Paley (first author) and Michael Hunter on 'Parliament and Slavery 1660-c.1700' which appeared in the journal Slavery and Abolition in 2010.

Sponsored by the English Department

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Jennifer Scanlon presents: "Art, Craft, or the Space Between? The Folly Cove Women's Printmaking Collective"

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February 24, 2015 12:00 PM  – 1:00 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

FACULTY SEMINAR

Jennifer Scanlon, William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of the Humanities in Gender and Women's Studies and Associate Dean for Faculty is the featured speaker. The title of her talk is: "Art, Craft, or the Space Between? The Folly Cove Women's Printmaking Collective."

Open to faculty and staff.
Buffet lunch $3, or bring your own lunch.

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Portland Playback Theater: "Letting the World In: Stories of Discovery"

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February 26, 2015 7:00 PM  – 8:30 PM
Sills Hall, Smith Auditorium

The Portland Playback Theater comes to campus for a wonderful evening of storytelling and improv theater! This troupe of highly-trained, multi-talented actors featuring Erin Curren, visiting lecturer in French, will "playback" audience stories of discovery, difficulty, culture, realization and more. The group joins the art of improvisation with real-life stories spontaneously shared by members of the audience. Using movement, dialogue and music, the actors seek to honor the countless moments and events that shape our lives. 

Portland Playback Theatre Company was founded in Portland, Maine in 2005. The Playback Theatre style models transformation; a new way to relate to the world. When trained playback practitioners enact a story told by a member of the audience, a deep bond of understanding is established between the “teller” and the audience. Playback helps people see their common humanity. When people join together in sharing their stories and watching the re-enactments, it engenders an ability to focus on commonalities rather then judgments of otherness.  

Hosted by the Off Campus Study office, along with the McKeen Center and other offices on campus.

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Lawrence Principe: "Science Before Science" Symposium and Plenary Lecture

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February 26, 2015 7:30 PM  – 9:00 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

Lawrence Principe is a professor of the history of science and technology and a professor of chemistry at Johns Hopkins University. His research specialization lies in exploring and understanding early modern (1500-1750) chymistry, a term intended to include both what we call “chemistry” and “alchemy” in a time before there existed any clear distinction between the two. He is the author of several scholarly monographs, including The Aspiring Adept: Robert Boyle and His Alchemical Quest and Alchemy Tried in the Fire: Starkey, Boyle, and the Fate of Helmontian Chymistry. He has also written for a general audience, with books like The Scientific Revolution: A Very Short Introduction published by Oxford University Press in 2011, and The Secrets of Alchemy published by the University of Chicago Press in 2013.

Open to the public free of charge. For more information, please contact the Department of English at 207-725-3552. 

Organized by the Medieval and Early Modern Studies program (MEMS)
Sponsored by the Andrew Mellon Foundation

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Symposium: "Science Before Science"

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February 27, 2015 9:00 AM  – 3:30 PM
Moulton Union, Lancaster Lounge

How did science operate before the Scientific Revolution? This symposium brings together an interdisciplinary group of scholars in the humanities to explore the theme of science before science—the medieval and early modern art of natural philosophy. The plenary lecture and the panels will discuss cutting-edge scholarship on alchemy, astronomy, botany, and climate change in the pre-modern world, as well as the global crosscurrents that transmitted Islamic learning to Europe.

Panel 1: “Botany”
9:00-10:30 AM
Speakers:
Lydia Barnett, Assistant Professor of History at Bates; Brian Ogilvie, Associate Professor of History at UMass Amherst; John Slater, Associate Professor of Spanish at UC Davis
Moderator:
Margaret Boyle, Assistant Professor of Romance Languages at Bowdoin College

Panel 2: “Astronomy”
11:00 AM-12:30 PM
Speakers
: Katherine Dauge-Roth, Associate Professor of Romance Languages at Bowdoin College; Claire Goldstein, Associate Professor of French at UC Davis; Crystal Hall, Visiting Assistant Professor in the Digital Humanities at Bowdoin College
Moderator
: Arielle Saiber, Associate Professor of Romance Languages at Bowdoin College

Panel 3: “Science and Islam”
2:00-3:30 PM
Speakers
: Robert Morrison, Associate Professor of Religion at Bowdoin College; F. Jamil Ragep, Professor of Islamic Studies at McGill University; George Saliba, Professor of Arabic and Islamic Science at Columbia University
Moderator
: Sally Ragep, Senior Researcher at the Institute of Islamic Studies at McGill University 

Open to the public free of charge. For more information, please contact the Department of English at 207-725-3552.

Organized by the Medieval and Early Modern Studies program (MEMS)
Sponsored by the Andrew Mellon Foundation

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Hester Blum: "Polar Imprints: The News from the Ends of the Earth"

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March 2, 2015 6:00 PM  – 7:30 PM
Hubbard Hall, Room 208 Thomas F. Shannon Room

Narratives of polar voyages enjoyed wide circulation in Anglo-American cultural and political spheres during the long nineteenth century. Yet the familiar travel accounts of adventurous voyage and their fictional counterparts were not the only forms of literary production generated by Arctic and Antarctic exploration. Many expeditions brought a surprising piece of equipment aboard ship: a printing press. With such presses, polar-voyaging sailors wrote and printed newspapers, broadsides, plays, and other reading matter beyond the Arctic and Antarctic Circles; these publications were produced almost exclusively for a reading audience comprised of the expedition’s crew members. 

In this presentation, Hester Blum, associate professor of English at Pennsylvania State University, will examine the first printed polar newspapers. What does this drive toward what she calls “extreme printing” tell us about the state of print culture and coterie publication in the nineteenth century Anglo-American world? Her talk will be attentive to the rhetorical distance between mass-published voyage accounts, and the coterie publications produced and circulated aboard ship. 'Polar Imprints' is attuned to the tension between the global ambitions of polar voyages, and the remarkably circumscribed conditions of their practice.

Sponsored by Africana Studies, Arctic Studies, and the English Department.

Free and Open to the Public

Note: This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin’s Live Webcasts page.

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Award Winning Author Jonas Lüscher: "The Beauty of Crisis": A Reading from the Novella 'Barbarian Spring'

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March 3, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

A leading Swiss industrialist on a business trip to Tunisia is invited to spend the week with the daughter of a local gangster. He accompanies her to the wedding of two London city traders at a desert luxury resort and, with the wedding party in full swing and the bride riding up the aisle on a camel, the global financial system stands on the brink of collapse. The British pound has depreciated tenfold, and their world begins to crumble around them. 

Swiss-German author Jonas Lüscher, a major emerging voice in European fiction, reads and discusses the English translation of his award-winning novella Barbarian Spring, a beautifully written account of the financial crisis in its global dimensions, and a powerful alternative to the dominating discourses of economics and politics. 

Born in Switzerland, Lüscher lives in Munich. After training as a primary school teacher in Bern and a few years in the German film industry, he studied at the School of Philosophy in Munich. He is currently a PhD student at the Department of Philosophy at the ETH Zurich.

For more information, please contact Jens Klenner (jklenner@bowdoin.edu)

Sponsored by the Departments of German, English and Economics.  Supported by the Andrew Mellon Foundation. 

Note: This talk will also be live streamed on Bowdoin’s Live Webcasts page.

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Kimberly Juanita Brown: "Afterimages of History: The Poetics of Photography in the Contemporary"

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March 24, 2015 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Dr. Kimberly Juanita Brown considers the fraught terrain of word and image in the twentieth-century construction of black identity. Marking painful historical moments that both frame and extend the parameters of racialized existence, Brown seeks to reconcile the import and utility of African American art practices heavily dependent on the visual. Using works from Audre Lorde, Michael S. Harper, and Lucille Clifton alongside photographs by Roy DeCarava and Carrie Mae Weems, she will explore the layered contingency of imagery within the arena of black subjectivity.

Brown is currently lecturer on Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality at Harvard University. Her research and teaching gather at the intersection of critical race theory and visual culture studies. Her book (forthcoming from Duke University Press), The Repeating Body: Slavery’s Visual Resonance in the Contemporary examines contemporary representations of slavery that emphasize the repetition of black women’s corporeal practices in the aftermath of the event of slavery.  A second project, Their Dead Among Us: Photography, Melancholy, and The Politics of the Visual, will explore the photographic dispossession of the body of the other and patterns of exclusion engendered by these ocular practices. 

Sponsored by the Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund, Departments of Art History and Africana Studies, and Bowdoin College Museum of Art

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Film Screening: 'The Auschwitz Gateway Film' with Filmmaker David Conover

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March 25, 2015 7:00 PM  – 9:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Filmmaker David Conover will screen his recently-produced eight-minute film created for the Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial Museum in Oświęcim, Poland.

The Auschwitz Gateway Film is a compelling and heartbreaking introduction to the horrors of the Holocaust at the largest concentration camp of the Nazi era, and will be shown to museum visitors before they walk through the infamous Arbeit Macht Frie ("work makes you free") gateway to enter the camp.

The screening will be followed by a conversation with Conover and Professor of English and Cinema Studies, Aviva Briefel.

Free and open to the public. No tickets required.

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The Human Significance of Climate Change

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April 2, 2015 12:30 PM  – 1:30 PM
Moulton Union, Main Lounge

"The Human Significance of Climate Change," by David Collings, professor of English.

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Cristina Malcolmson: 'Studies of Skin Color in the Early Royal Society'

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April 23, 2015 4:30 PM  – 5:30 PM
Massachusetts Hall, Faculty Room

In her most recent book, Studies of Skin Color in the Early Royal Society: Boyle, Cavendish, Swift (Ashgate, 2013), Cristina Malcolmson demonstrates how unstable the idea of race remained in England at the end of the seventeenth century, and yet how extensively the intertwined institutions of government, colonialism, the slave trade, and science were collaborating to usher it into public view.

Arguing that the early Royal Society moved science toward racialization by giving skin color a new prominence as an object of experiment and observation, Malcolmson provides the first book-length examination of studies of skin color in the society. She also brings new light to the relationship between early modern literature, science, and the establishment of scientific racism in the nineteenth century.

Malcolmson, professor of English at Bates College, has also written The 'Empire of Man over the Inferior Creatures': British Women, Race, and Seventeenth-Century Science for The Palgrave History of British Women's Writing, and a collaborative article with Ruth Paley (first author) and Michael Hunter on 'Parliament and Slavery 1660-c.1700' which appeared in the journal Slavery and Abolition in 2010.

Sponsored by the English Department. For more information, contact department coordinator Laurie Holland at 207-725-3552 or lholland@bowdoin.edu.

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