Location: Bowdoin / Economics / Courses / Fall 2013

Economics

Fall 2013

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018. The Art of the Deal: Commerce and Culture
Bibi Khan M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55
Explores the economics of culture, including the analysis of markets for art, music, literature, and movies. If culture is “priceless,” then why do artists starve while providers of pet food make billions? Why are paintings by dead artists generally worth more than paintings by living artists? Could music piracy on the information superhighway benefit society? Can Tom Hanks turn a terrible movie into a contender at the box office? Students are not required to have any prior knowledge of economics, and will not be allowed to argue that baseball comprises culture.

101. Principles of Microeconomics
Deborah DeGraff M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. The theory of demand, supply, cost, and market structure is developed and then applied to problems in antitrust policy, environmental quality, energy, education, health, the role of the corporation in society, income distribution, and poverty. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both Economics 1101 {101} and 1102 {102}.

101. Principles of Microeconomics
Daniel Stone T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. The theory of demand, supply, cost, and market structure is developed and then applied to problems in antitrust policy, environmental quality, energy, education, health, the role of the corporation in society, income distribution, and poverty. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both Economics 1101 {101} and 1102 {102}.

101. Principles of Microeconomics
Daniel Stone T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. The theory of demand, supply, cost, and market structure is developed and then applied to problems in antitrust policy, environmental quality, energy, education, health, the role of the corporation in society, income distribution, and poverty. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both Economics 1101 {101} and 1102 {102}.

101. Principles of Microeconomics
Bibi Khan M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on the allocation of resources through markets. The theory of demand, supply, cost, and market structure is developed and then applied to problems in antitrust policy, environmental quality, energy, education, health, the role of the corporation in society, income distribution, and poverty. Students desiring a comprehensive introduction to economic reasoning should take both Economics 1101 {101} and 1102 {102}.

102. Principles of Macroeconomics
Yao Tang T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on determinants of the level of national income, prices, and employment. Current problems of inflation and unemployment are explored with the aid of such analysis, and alternative views of the effectiveness of fiscal, monetary, and other governmental policies are analyzed. Attention is given to the sources and consequences of economic growth and to the nature and significance of international linkages through goods and capital markets.

102. Principles of Macroeconomics
Stephen Meardon M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55
An introduction to economic analysis and institutions, with special emphasis on determinants of the level of national income, prices, and employment. Current problems of inflation and unemployment are explored with the aid of such analysis, and alternative views of the effectiveness of fiscal, monetary, and other governmental policies are analyzed. Attention is given to the sources and consequences of economic growth and to the nature and significance of international linkages through goods and capital markets.

213. History of Economic Thought
Stephen Meardon M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55
A historical study of insights and methods of inquiry into the functions of markets and the role of government in shaping them. Readings include the original works of economic thinkers from the eighteenth to twentieth centuries, including Adam Smith, David Ricardo, Henry Carey, Karl Marx, Henry George, Thorstein Veblen, and John Maynard Keynes, among others. Different historiographical approaches are employed, including examination of the problems motivating past thinkers as well as the relevance of their ideas to modern economics.

221. Marxian Political Economy
Jonathan Goldstein T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
An alternative (heterodox) analysis of a capitalist market economy rooted in Marx’s methodological framework, which focuses on the interconnected role played by market relations, class/power relations, exploitation and internal tendencies towards growth, crisis, and qualitative change. Students are introduced to the Marxian method and economic theory through a reading of Volume I of Capital. Subsequently, the Marxian framework is applied to analyze the modern capitalist economy with an emphasis on the secular and cyclical instability of the economy, changing institutional structures and their ability to promote growth, labor market issues, globalization, and the decline of the Soviet Union.

255. Microeconomics
Guillermo Herrera M 8:00 - 9:25, W 8:00 - 9:25
An intermediate-level study of contemporary microeconomic theory. Analysis of the theory of resource allocation and distribution, with major emphasis on systems of markets and prices as a social mechanism for making resource allocation decisions. Topics include the theory of individual choice and demand, the theory of the firm, market equilibrium under competition and monopoly, general equilibrium theory, and welfare economics.

255. Microeconomics
Guillermo Herrera M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25
An intermediate-level study of contemporary microeconomic theory. Analysis of the theory of resource allocation and distribution, with major emphasis on systems of markets and prices as a social mechanism for making resource allocation decisions. Topics include the theory of individual choice and demand, the theory of the firm, market equilibrium under competition and monopoly, general equilibrium theory, and welfare economics.

256. Macroeconomics
Yun Kim T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
An intermediate-level study of contemporary national income, employment, and inflation theory. Consumption, investment, government receipts, government expenditures, money, and interest rates are examined for their determinants, interrelationships, and role in determining the level of aggregate economic activity. Policy implications are drawn from the analysis.

257. Economics Statistics
Rachel Connelly M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55
An introduction to the data and statistical methods used in economics. A review of the systems that generate economic data and the accuracy of such data is followed by an examination of the statistical methods used in testing the hypotheses of economic theory, both micro- and macro-. Probability, random variables and their distributions, methods of estimating parameters, hypothesis testing, regression, and correlation are covered. The application of multiple regression to economic problems is stressed. Students who have taken Mathematics 2606 {265} are encouraged to take Economics 3516 {316} instead of this course.

260. Financial Analysis
Bing Chen T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
Provides a thorough exposure to asset valuation, portfolio management, and corporate financial decision-making. In addition, presents the financial accounting concepts necessary to utilize corporate financial statements in valuation and decision-making exercises. Topics include functions and structure of the financial system; measures of return and risk, and discounted cash-flow analysis; overview of financial statements and financial statement analysis; portfolio theory, asset pricing models, and efficient markets theory; corporate decision-making—the cost of capital, capital budgeting, and capital structure. Mathematics 161 is recommended.

301. The Economics of the Family
Rachel Connelly M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55
Seminar. Microeconomic analysis of the family—gender roles and related institutions. Topics include marriage, fertility, married women’s labor supply, divorce, and the family as an economic organization.

309. International Finance
Yao Tang T 8:30 - 9:55, TH 8:30 - 9:55
Seminar. Surveys a number of topics in international finance and international macroeconomics, including balance of payments, exchange rate determination, the Mundell-Fleming model of output and exchange rate, exchange rate regimes, international capital flows, and international financial crises. Involves data analysis to empirically evaluate the theoretical models. Also provides a special focus on Asia by discussing issues such as Asia's role in the global imbalances, China's exchange rate regime, and the currency carry trade associated with the Japanese Yen.

316. Econometrics
Jonathan Goldstein T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
Seminar. A study of the mathematical formulation of economic models and the statistical methods of testing them. A detailed examination of the general linear regression model, its assumptions, and its extensions. Applications to both micro- and macroeconomics are considered. Though most of the course deals with single-equation models, an introduction to the estimation of systems of equations is included. An empirical research paper is required.

319. The Economics of Development
Deborah DeGraff M 10:00 - 11:25, W 10:00 - 11:25
Seminar. Theoretical and empirical analysis of selected microeconomic issues within the context of developing countries. Has a dual focus on modeling household decisions and on the effects of government policy and intervention on household behavior and well being. Topics include agricultural production, land use systems, technology and credit markets, household labor allocation and migration, investment in education and health, and income inequality.