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Earth and Oceanographic Science

Tricia Thibodeau '13 wins first prize at Hollings Scholar Symposium

Story posted October 02, 2012

Tricia Thibodeau '13 wins first prize at Hollings Scholar SymposiumThis past summer Earth and Oceanographic Science major Patricia Thibodeau ’13 studied the effects of ocean acidification on pteropod shells at the North West Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, Washington. This research was funded by the NOAA Hollings Scholarship that Tricia was awarded last year.

At the conclusion of the summer, Tricia presented her work at the Hollings Scholar symposium. She won first prize in the “Climate Adaptation and Mitigation” category.

The Hollings Scholarship Program provides successful undergraduate applicants with awards that include academic assistance (up to a maximum of $8,000 per year) for full-time study during the 9-month academic year; a 10-week, full-time internship position ($650/week) during the summer at a NOAA facility; and, if reappointed, academic assistance (up to a maximum of $8,000) for full-time study during a second 9-month academic year. The internship between the first and second years of the award provides the Scholars with "hands-on"/ practical educational training experience in NOAA-related science, research, technology, policy, management, and education activities.


Pteropod photograph by Patricia Thibodeau ’13 that was featured in a Washington Post article: Ocean acidification emerges as new climate threat
Pteropod photograph by Patricia Thibodeau ’13 that was featured in a
Washington Post article: Ocean acidification emerges as new climate threat

Impacts of Ocean Acidificatioon on Zooplankton in Puget Sound (PDF)
A PDF of her presentation is available for view:
Impacts of Ocean Acidificatioon on Zooplankton in Puget Sound

Pteropods are pelagic mollusks that live in high latitude oceans. They produce a calcareous shell that is sensitive to decreasing ocean pH.