Location: Bowdoin / Chemistry / Courses / Fall 2012

Chemistry

Fall 2012

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011. Great Issues in Science
Daniel Steffenson M 11:30 - 12:25, W 11:30 - 12:25, F 11:30 - 12:25 Searles-127
Presents a realistic and mature picture of science and the methods employed by current scientists to provide acceptable justifications for scientific hypotheses and theories. Starting with the invention of science by the ancient Greek philosophers (Lucretius, On the Nature of Things) and using historical examples from various sciences, three philosophical models of justification examined in detail: logical empiricism (the Vienna Circle), Fallibilism (Popper), and Conventionalism (Kuhn). Several literary images of science (Vonnegut, Brecht, Pynchon, Crichton) are compared to the philosophical models. Examines the role of scientists in making certain value judgments such as organ transplants or stem cell research.

059. Chemistry of Consumer Goods
Yi Jin Gorske T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 Druckenmiller-016
Natural and synthetic “chemicals” make up virtually everything we purchase and consume from breakfast cereals to soaps, shampoo bottles, and over-the-counter medications. Examines the chemical components of food, drugs, soaps, plastics, and other consumer goods we encounter daily. Explores scientific resources that can be used to obtain information on product components, safety, and regulations. Also considers topics related to some of the current safety concerns raised by chemicals found in common household items through case studies and research projects. Assumes no background in science. Not open to students who have credit for a chemistry course numbered 100 or higher.

101. Introductory Chemistry I
Michael Danahy M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25 Cleaveland-151
The first course in a two-semester introductory college chemistry sequence. Introduction to the states of matter and their properties, stoichiometry and the mole unit, properties of gases, thermochemistry, atomic structure, and periodic properties of the elements. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week. To ensure proper placement, students must take the chemistry placement examination and must be recommended for placement in Chemistry 101. Students continuing in chemistry will take Chemistry 102, not Chemistry 109, as their next chemistry course.

101. Introductory Chemistry I
Jeffrey Nagle T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Druckenmiller-016
The first course in a two-semester introductory college chemistry sequence. Introduction to the states of matter and their properties, stoichiometry and the mole unit, properties of gases, thermochemistry, atomic structure, and periodic properties of the elements. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week. To ensure proper placement, students must take the chemistry placement examination and must be recommended for placement in Chemistry 101. Students continuing in chemistry will take Chemistry 102, not Chemistry 109, as their next chemistry course.

109. General Chemistry
Ronald Christensen M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25 Druckenmiller-016
A one-semester introductory chemistry course. Introduction to models of atomic structure, chemical bonding, and intermolecular forces; characterization of chemical systems at equilibrium and spontaneous processes; the rates of chemical reactions; and special topics. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week. Students who have taken Chemistry 102 may not take Chemistry 109 for credit. To ensure proper placement, students must take the chemistry placement examination and must be recommended for placement in Chemistry 109.

210. Chemical Analysis
Ryan Nelson M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25 Druckenmiller-020
Methods of separating and quantifying inorganic and organic compounds using volumetric, spectrophotometric, electrometric, and chromatographic techniques are covered. Chemical equilibria and the statistical analysis of data are addressed. Lectures and four hours of laboratory work per week.

225. Organic Chemistry I
Michael Danahy M 8:30 - 9:25, W 8:30 - 9:25, F 8:30 - 9:25 Cleaveland-151
Introduction to the chemistry of the compounds of carbon. Describes bonding, conformations, and stereochemistry of small organic molecules. Reactions of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, and alcohols are discussed. Kinetic and thermodynamic data are used to formulate reaction mechanisms. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week.

225. Organic Chemistry I
Richard Broene M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25 Cleaveland-151
Introduction to the chemistry of the compounds of carbon. Describes bonding, conformations, and stereochemistry of small organic molecules. Reactions of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, and alcohols are discussed. Kinetic and thermodynamic data are used to formulate reaction mechanisms. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week.

225. Organic Chemistry I
Benjamin Gorske M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25 Druckenmiller-004
Introduction to the chemistry of the compounds of carbon. Describes bonding, conformations, and stereochemistry of small organic molecules. Reactions of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, and alcohols are discussed. Kinetic and thermodynamic data are used to formulate reaction mechanisms. Lectures, review sessions, and four hours of laboratory work per week.

251. Chemical Thermodynamics and Kinetics
Daniel Steffenson M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25 Druckenmiller-020
Thermodynamics and its application to chemical changes and equilibria that occur in the gaseous, solid, and liquid states. The behavior of systems at equilibrium and chemical kinetics are related to molecular properties by means of statistical mechanics and the laws of thermodynamics. Lectures and four hours of laboratory work per week. Mathematics 181 is recommended.

306. Advanced Environmental Organic Chemistry
Dharanija Vasudevan T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55 Druckenmiller-024
Human activities result in the intentional or inadvertent release of organic chemicals into the natural environment. Interconnected physical, chemical, and biological processes influence the environmental fate of chemicals and the extent human and ecosystem exposure. Focuses on the thermodynamics and kinetics of chemical transformations in the natural environment via nucleophilic, redox, photolytic, and biological (microbial) reactions.

327. Biomimetic and Supramolecular Chemistry
Benjamin Gorske T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Adams-114
A guided exploration of the primary scientific literature concerning weak covalent and noncovalent interactions that collectively determine the three-dimensional structures of biomimetic and foldameric molecules and that govern the aggregation of molecules into discrete multi-molecular assemblies. Surveys practical applications in biochemical investigation, catalysis, and medicine, as well as in the young but rapidly expanding sciences of molecular and nanostructural engineering.

340. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
Jeffrey Nagle T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25 Hatch Library-210
Inorganic chemistry is incredibly diverse and wide-ranging in scope. Symmetry, spectroscopy, and quantum-based theories and computational methods are employed to gain insight into the molecular and electronic structures and reaction mechanisms of inorganic compounds. Examples from the current literature emphasized, including topics in inorganic photochemistry and biochemistry. Chemistry 252 is recommended.