Upcoming Events

Allen Hockley: "Woodblock Illustrated Histories of Meiji-era Japan"

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October 14, 2015 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

The threat westernization posed to indigenous cultural practices during the middle decades of the Meiji era (1868-1912) sparked a resurgence of traditional values that rippled through government policies, social institutions, and cultural production. Historians have invested considerable effort to understand the causes, manifestations, and legacies of these developments. Art historians have been attentive to popular artists' engagement with social and cultural developments of the Meiji era. But apart from Sino- and Russo-Japanese war imagery, the role of popular visual culture in the formation and dissemination of Meiji-era nativist and nationalist discourses has not yet received serious consideration. This lecture addresses these lapses by focusing on a large and varied corpus of woodblock prints and illustrated books that engage nationalist ideologies by attempting to visualize key moments in Japan's 2500-year history.

Allen Hockley, associate professor of Art History and Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at Dartmouth College, is a specialist in Japanese art. He received his B.A. from the University of Victoria, M.A. from the University of British Columbia, and his Ph.D. from the University of Toronto.

This lecture is sponsored by Bowdoin College Art History and Asian Studies Departments.

Image: Adachi Gink: Empress Regent Jing Subjugates Korea, from Illustrated Historical Synopsis of Japan, 1888

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Namiko Kunimoto: "Nakamura Hiroshi and the Politics of Embodiment"

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November 11, 2015 4:30 PM  – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Dr. Namiko Kunimoto, assistant professor of art history at the Ohio State University will deliver a public lecture on the modern Japanese artist Nakamura Hiroshi (b. 1932).  A significant artist active in the 1950s, Nakamura was part of the "reportage" movement and created works that critiqued the US military presence in Japan. Dr. Kunimoto will be discussing these paintings as well as Nakamura Hiroshi's later turn to Surrealism within the context of postwar Japanese politics. 

Sponsored by the Departments of Art History and Asian Studies.

Image: Taken from "Sunagawa No. 5" by Hiroshi Nakamura, 1955, Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo.

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