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Art History

Fall 2012

Opening for Michelangelo: Art and Afterlife

Opening for Michelangelo: Art and Afterlife

December 6, 20125:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

You are invited to a reception from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, December 6, 2012, at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art to celebrate the exhibition Michelangelo: Art and Afterlife, on view in the Zuckert Gallery December 6 through December 23, 2012.

This student-organized exhibition highlights the influence of Michelangelo's art and the legend of his character in the years after his death. Reproductive prints by Renaissance artists, images of Michelangelo, and drawings that emulate his style comprise the show. Viewers are offered a pithy example of how Michelangelo made his mark on more than the Sistine Chapel.

The exhibition was organized by students in Associate Professor of Art History Susan Wegner's seminar, AH 324: Art and Life of Michelangelo.

Image: Giorgio Ghisi, Italian, 1520-1582. Allegory of Life, 1561, engraving. Gift of Leo Steinberg 1996.88.

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Lecture:

Lecture: "From Abject Horror to Witty Play: The Oscillating Modes of the Supernatural in 19th-Century Japan"

November 15, 20124:30 PM – 5:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Japanese prints from the Edo period (1600-1868) often feature haggard ghosts, vengeful demons, and mischievous beings. Daniel McKee will discuss these prints in connection with literary, theatrical, and political discourses, reading them as a medium of socio-political critique.

McKee, Japanese studies bibliographer and adjunct assistant professor in Cornell University's East Asian Program, was formerly the curator of the Clark Center for Japanese Art.

This talk is organized in conjunction with Fantastic Stories: The Supernatural in Nineteenth-Century Japanese Prints, on view at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, and is presented as part of the series of events recognizing 25 years of the Asian Studies Program at Bowdoin.

Sponsored by the Lectures and Concerts Committee, Blythe Bickel Edwards Fund, Asian Studies Program, Art History Division of the Department of Art, and the Bowdoin College Museum of Art. Presented by Asian Studies and the Bowdoin College Museum of Art

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Exhibition Opening:

Exhibition Opening: "A Printmaking ABC: In Memoriam David P. Becker"

November 15, 201210:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Museum of Art, Bernard & Barbro Osher Gallery

This selection of masterly prints from Albrecht Durer and Rembrandt to David Hockney and Jasper Johns is drawn from the collection of 1,500 prints given and bequeathed by Bowdoin alumnus David P. Becker, class of 1970.

Becker, a former trustee of the College, was an internationally recognized print scholar whose expertise encompassed drawings, illustrated books, and writing manuals. Throughout his life, he collected with the intent to build a comprehensive teaching resource for his alma mater.

This exhibition will introduce visitors to the techniques, themes, and stylistic developments of western printmaking since the Renaissance. The exhibition is on view through March 10, 2013.

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Susan Merriam, Associate Professor of Art History from Bard College: Being Animal, Becoming Human. Exploring the Human-Animal Boundary in the Visual Culture of Early Modern Europe

Susan Merriam, Associate Professor of Art History from Bard College: Being Animal, Becoming Human. Exploring the Human-Animal Boundary in the Visual Culture of Early Modern Europe

November 14, 20126:30 PM – 8:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Susan Merriam, Associate Professor of Art History from Bard College will speak on "Being Animal, Becoming Human. Exploring the Human-Animal Boundary in the Visual Culture of Early Modern Europe" She will consider early modern attitudes toward and images of animals

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Exhibition Opening:

Exhibition Opening: "Fantastic Stories: The Supernatural in 19th-Century Japanese Prints"

November 9, 201210:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Museum of Art, Center Gallery

Organized on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of Asian Studies at Bowdoin College, the exhibition "Fantastic Stories: The Supernatural in Nineteenth-century Japanese Prints" features forty prints by well-known artists such as Utagawa Kuniyoshi, Kawanabe Kyosai, Utagawa Kunisada, and Katsushika Hokusai. Viewers will delve into the world of mythical creatures and ghostly apparitions in the Edo period. The exhibition continues through March 3, 2013.

Image: Utagawa Kunisada, Japanese, 1786-1865, The Cat Witch, color woodblock (detail).

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"Markets and Networks: An Art Historian's Journey into the Digital Landscape: by Anne Helmreich Nov. 2

November 2, 201212:30 PM – 1:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

"Markets and Networks: An Art Historian's Journey into the Digital Landscape"

Dr. Anne Helmreich, Senior Program Office, Getty Foundation (Associate Professor of Art History, Case Western Reserve University, on leave)

Dr. Helmreich has published widely on British art, including work on garden history, landscape painting, and the history of London's art market. She is currently serving as a Senior Program Officer at the Getty Foundation, where one of her areas of specialization is the digital humanities. She will speak about her most recent scholarship, which uses social network analysis to visualize and interpret the international art market in the late 19th century. She will also offer her perspective on the present condition and future of the digital humanities, and the ways in which art historians and other humanists might integrate computational methodologies into their own work.


The lecture is part of the "Computation and the Liberal Arts Colloquium Series," funded by the Office of the Dean for Academic Affairs.

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Lecture:

Lecture: "Truth to Nature: John Ruskin and Landscape Painting 1840s-1870s" Nov. 1

November 1, 20124:15 PM – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

"Truth to Nature: John Ruskin and Landscape Painting 1840s-1870s"

Dr. Anne Helmreich
Senior Program Office, Getty Foundation; Associate Professor of Art History, Case Western Reserve University
Thursday, November 1, 2012
4:15 pm
Beam Classroom, VAC

The quest for truth to nature irrevocably shaped the course of British art and science in the nineteenth century. This talk examines the dynamic relationship between these two seemingly disparate disciplines and its impact on American art making, drawing on examples highlighted in the exhibition 'We Never See Anything Clearly': John Ruskin and Landscape Painting 1840s-1870s at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art.

Image:
John Ruskin
Bellinzona, 1858
watercolor and gouache over graphite on off-white wove paper
8 1/2 in. x 6 1/16 in. (21.59 cm x 15.4 cm)
Gift of Miss Susan Dwight Bliss
1956.24.257
Bowdoin College Museum of Art

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Exhibit Opening:

Exhibit Opening: "'We Never See Anything Clearly': John Ruskin and Landscape Painting, 1840s-1870s" Oct. 30

October 30, 20121:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Museum of Art, Becker Gallery

First day for the exhibition: "We Never See Anything Clearly": John Ruskin and Landscape Painting, 1840s-1870s.

John Ruskin (1819-1900), a prominent English art critic of the Victorian era, discussed in his writings possibilities for the reconciliation of two adverse trends in British art of his time: the atmospheric effects that characterize art by J.M.W. Turner and his circle and the heightened detail cherished by the Pre-Raphaelites and their emulators.

The exhibition, drawn from the permanent collection, features several of Ruskin's own drawings and those of English and American artists whose struggles with pictorial detail and effect echoed his own.

Art majors Ben Livingston, class of 2013, and Ursula Moreno-VanderLaan, class of 2013, worked with Pamela Fletcher, Associate Professor of Art History, to research and organize the exhibition, as part of Bowdoin College course ART 352, The Pre-Raphaelites.

The exhibition will be on view in the Becker Gallery at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art through December 23, 2012.

Image: John Ruskin, English, 1819-1900. Bellinzona, 1858, watercolor and gouache over graphite. Gift of Miss Susan Dwight Bliss.

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Bowdoin Museum of Art Fall Open House Oct. 18

Bowdoin Museum of Art Fall Open House Oct. 18

October 18, 20125:30 PM – 7:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

A festive reception to celebrate fall exhibitions, including In a New Light: American and European Masters; In Dialogue: Art from Bowdoin and Colgate Collections; Making a Presence: F. Holland Day in Artistic Photography; The Renaissance and the Revival of Classical Antiquity; Simply Divine: Gods and Demigods in the Ancient Mediterranean; "We Never See Anything Clearly": John Ruskin and Landscape Painting, 1840s-1870s; and William Wegman: Hello Nature, which closes October 21.

All programs and exhibitions presented by the Bowdoin College Museum of Art are open to the public free of charge. Museum hours are Tuesday-Saturday: 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thursday: 10 a.m.-8:30 p.m.; Sunday: Special hours on Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. through October 21, 2012, for the William Wegman exhibition. Closed on Mondays and national holidays.

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Lecture, William Wegman in Conversation: Performance, Process, and Early Video Art

Lecture, William Wegman in Conversation: Performance, Process, and Early Video Art

October 18, 20124:30 PM – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Artist William Wegman will return to campus on Thursday, October 18, for "William Wegman in Conversation: Performance, Process, and Early Video Art" at 4:30 p.m. in Kresge Auditorium, Visual Arts Center. Wegman will be joined for the discussion by Lori Zippay, executive director of Electronic Arts Intermix, New York City. Wegman first established himself within the contexts of video and performance art in the 1970s. In conversation with Zippay, he will comment on a selection of his early films and explain how they gave rise to and influenced his current artistic practice.

The Bowdoin College Museum of Art's Fall Open House will follow the talk, from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the museum. This festive reception celebrates all the fall exhibitions on view, including William Wegman: Hello Nature (which closes Oct. 21) and Making a Presence: F. Holland Day in Artistic Photography.

All programs and exhibitions presented by the Bowdoin College Museum of Art are open to the public free of charge. Museum hours are Tuesday-Saturday: 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thursday: 10 a.m.-8:30 p.m.; Sunday: Special hours on Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. through October 21, 2012, for the William Wegman exhibition. Closed on Mondays and national holidays.

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Beauty and the Eye of the Beholder by Sara Lipton (Assoc Prof. of History, SUNY Stony Brook)

Beauty and the Eye of the Beholder by Sara Lipton (Assoc Prof. of History, SUNY Stony Brook)

October 11, 20126:00 PM – 7:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

This lecture offers a new chronology and explanation for the introduction of anti-Jewish imagery into Christian art in the Middle Ages. It argues that the creation of dark, grotesque, and scowling Jewish figures is not, as so often been assumed, a reflection of rising anti-Semitism. Rather, the iconography grows out of changing Christian religious culture. As Christian devotions became more affective and artists began to depict the Crucified Christ as dying or dead, Christians were forced to ponder the nature of divine beauty and struggle with the indignity of divine suffering. Failure to be properly moved by portrayals of Christ's affliction was identified with "Jewish" superficial and materialistic ways of looking, and depictions of Jews exaggerated their defiance and hostility in order to provide a counter-model for Christian seeing. But if the imagery was not inspired by ethnic hatred, it acted powerfully to help create it.

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William Wegman's Weimaraners and Other Animals in Contemporary Art

William Wegman's Weimaraners and Other Animals in Contemporary Art

October 4, 20124:30 PM – 5:30 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Susan McHugh, associate professor, Department of English, University of New England, will deliver this lecture presented in conjunction with the exhibition William Wegman: Hello Nature. Respondent: Daniel Kany, Art Historian and Critic.

Susan McHugh is the author of Animal Stories: Narrating across Species Lines, 2011, in the University of Minnesota Press's Posthumanities series, as well as Dog, 2004, a volume in Reaktion Books' groundbreaking Animal series.

William Wegman: Hello Nature features over 100 works, including painting, photography, video, and drawing, all produced in or inspired by Maine, where Wegman has summered since the late 1970s. Taken together, this body of work demonstrates Wegman's rigorous and sustained engagement with the natural world and places the artist squarely within the American landscape tradition. On view through October 21, 2012.

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