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Updated: 13 min 55 sec ago

1 Shot in Apparent Utah Courthouse Scuffle

Mon, 04/21/2014 - 13:21

An altercation in a federal courthouse in Utah ended with a defendant shot Monday, after a U.S Marshall opened fire when the defendant allegedly tried to stab a witness with a pen.

Salt Lake City police responded to reports of shots fired in the courthouse at about 10 a.m., the Salt Lake Tribune reports. Authorities confirmed that the defendant was shot and critically wounded as he rushed the witness stand.

An FBI spokesperson said that defendant Siale Angilau, a suspected member of the Tongen Crips gang, was hospitalized with at least one chest wound, the AP reports. His was the last in a series of Crip-related cases. Melodie Rydalch of the U.S. Attorney’s Office told the Tribune that the shooting was related to gang violence.

Witnesses at the scene reported seeing an apparent gunshot victim carried out on a stretcher. The courthouse was put on lockdown shortly after the incident.

[Salt Lake Tribune]

Categories: Magazines

This Is Google’s Dead-Simple Formula for a Perfect Resume

Mon, 04/21/2014 - 13:19

For soon-to-be college graduates or anyone else currently on the job hunt, Google’s head of human resources has some advice for impressing potential employers. Laszlo Bock, who oversees the hiring of 100 new Google employees each week, offered some more morsels of wisdom to the New York Times’ Thomas Friedman this weekend (a conversation earlier this year between Bock and Friedman touched on the same topic). Here’s a quick breakdown of his key insights.

Be specific on resumes: Bock points out that many people’s resumes are overly vague. Instead a resume should offer specific details about a worker’s job experience that help contextualize his accomplishments. Bock explains: “Most people would write a résumé like this: ‘Wrote editorials for The New York Times.’ Better would be to say: ‘Had 50 op-eds published compared to average of 6 by most op-ed [writers] as a result of providing deep insight into the following area for three years.’”

Choose hard courses over straight A’s: Bock says a lower grade in a more challenging course can be more impressive to employers than a stellar performance in an easier class. He said a B in computer science could be more significant than an A+ in English “because it signals a rigor in your thinking and a more challenging course load.”

Explain your thought process in job interviews: Much like resumes, Bock says that specificity here is important. Employers want to know how a potential worker thinks to see whether they will be good at solving problems on the job. He recommends using this structure to explain your experiences to an employer: “What you want to do is say: ‘Here’s the attribute I’m going to demonstrate; here’s the story demonstrating it; here’s how that story demonstrated that attribute.’ ” Using this method shows a worker’s ability to think logically and evaluate their own performance in a critical way.

Read the full interview over at The Times.

Categories: Magazines

30 Crazy Things You Didn’t Know About Sleep

Mon, 04/21/2014 - 13:13

Sleepy’s mattress retailer is pretty pro-sleep. So to help educate a consumer base —and, you know, promote — the company came up with a list of 30 “insane” facts about it. They range from the awesome (gamers are more likely to be able to control their dreams) to depressing (a new parent will lose about 1055.6 hours of sleep in the first year of their child’s life… that’s almost 44 days.)

Explore more visuals like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually.
 

Categories: Magazines

Doh! Government Proposal Could Make Beer Prices Soar

Mon, 04/21/2014 - 13:12
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There’s a lot to hate about changes proposed by the FDA, which could push prices higher not only for beer, but for milk and meat as well. The new regulations are being bashed as wasteful and anti-recycling to boot.

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For centuries, beer manufacturers and farmers have enjoyed a mutually beneficial arrangement, in which the barley and other spent grain that’s left over in the brewing process is sold or given to farmers to use as cheap feed for animals.

“I get free waste removal and he gets free feed — it doesn’t get any better than that,” Kyle Williams, owner and brewer at North Carolina’s Brevard Brewing Co., who works with the nearby Busybee Farm, explained in a recent (Hendersonville) Times-News story. “It’s a perfectly symbiotic relationship.”

This relationship is in jeopardy, however, due to changes proposed by the FDA that are part of the broader Food Safety Modernization Act. Brewers say that if the proposal is approved, they would be required to dry and package spent grain before it’s shipped off to farmers as feed. The equipment needed and administrative hassles required to handle that extra step in the waste removal process would cost a bundle—as much as $13 million per brewing facility, Scott Mennen, vice president of brewery operations at Widmer Brothers Brewery in North Portland, Ore., told the Oregonian. “That would be cost prohibitive,” Mennen said. “Most brewers would have to put this material in a landfill.”

(MORE: That Craft Beer You’re Drinking Isn’t Craft Beer. Do You Care?)

The proposals, as well as the Food Safety Modernization Act in general, are obviously designed to protect consumers and make food safer. But no one has made much of a case indicating that using spent grain as feed is unsafe for animals or humans—an FDA spokesperson cited in the Oregonian piece couldn’t a single example in which the age-old practice has caused problems.

The Brewers Association declared the FDA proposal an “unwarranted burden for all brewers,” arguing that if the regulations would approved, costs would rise for brewers—and, inevitably, for drinkers who buy products made by those brewers—and that the changes would also be bad for the environment:

Brewers of all sizes must either adhere to new processes, testing requirements, recordkeeping and other regulatory requirements or send their spent grain to landfills, wasting a reliable food source for farm animals and triggering a significant economic and environmental cost.

Right behind brewers in the protest over the new regulations are farmers, who are potentially losing an inexpensive stream of feed for animals. The system of recycling a nearby brewer’s spent grain “saves me so much money in feed costs it’s incredible,” one small farmer in North Carolina, who uses the grain to feed cattle, pigs, and chickens, said to the Times-News. “If I couldn’t get the grain, it wouldn’t be justifiable for me to be in the hog business, because it keeps the cost down to where it’s affordable for me to feed them — that would be one more industry I would be out of.”

To recap, the new FDA proposal would raise the costs and complications in the of production process for beer brewers, and would also make it more expensive for farmers to feed animals, perhaps even to the point of putting some out of business. The proposal wasn’t created to address some specific safety problem, nor out of concern for the environment—in fact, approval of the new regulations could result in more waste at landfills, which is less than ideal for the environment.

(MORE: The Resurgence of Cheap Old-School Mass-Market Beer)

And horror of all horrors, your beer could wind up costing more down the line. Same thing for meat, dairy, and a wide range of products that originate at farms, as the rise in feed prices is a prime reason why there’s been such as steep rise in beef prices lately.

The FDA is currently reviewing the proposed rule changes, and it is including the overwhelmingly negative feedback it has received from brewers and farmers in this process. A revised proposal is expected sometime this summer.

Categories: Magazines

Immigration Activists Try to Ramp up Pressure on Obama Again

Mon, 04/21/2014 - 13:02

For months now, the pattern has been the same. Immigration activists, frustrated with inaction, latch onto some small glimmer of hope: a new campaign to pressure the powerful, or an approving remark by someone who can break the legislative stalemate. Each time the prospect of progress fades as quickly as it appeared.

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In the 10 months since the Senate passed a comprehensive reform of U.S. immigration law, it has become abundantly clear that the GOP-controlled House won’t follow suit before November’s midterm elections. A report last week that House Speaker John Boehner was “hellbent” on passing an immigration overhaul in 2014 was swiftly shot down by his spokesman. “Nothing has changed,” said the spokesman, Brendan Buck.

With reform stalled in the House, immigration reformers have once again ratcheted up pressure on President Barack Obama. They hope to convince Obama to take executive action to slow the tide of deportations.

A memo released Monday by the AFL-CIO outlines the steps it believes the Obama Administration can take to ease the impact of immigration enforcement on immigrant families. The memo comes as Jeh Johnson, Obama’s new secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, conducts a review of the Administration’s enforcement policies. The document calls for DHS to take four concrete steps: granting work permits to certain undocumented immigrants; reclaiming federal authority over enforcement policy from the states; reforming the removal process; and protecting undocumented workers who file workplace grievances. (Read the full memo here.)

Obama has repeatedly resisted calls for him to use executive authority. He says he lacks the discretion to make the changes activists have sought—an argument that many top Democrats reject. “The only way to truly fix it is through congressional action. We have already tried to take as many administrative steps as we could,” Obama said in a news conference last week.

But with House Republicans refusing to budge, proponents of reform on both sides of the aisle have warned that Obama will act if Congress won’t. Exercising executive authority to ease deportations, the top concern of Hispanic groups, could help mend fraying ties with Latino voters and nudge them toward the polls before November elections that look grim for Democrats. Obama has made a similar move in the past: In the summer of 2012, with his reelection hanging in the balance, Obama signed an order that granted relief from deportations for certain young adults who had been brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

“I’m convinced that if we don’t get it done by the August break, the president, who is feeling a lot of pressure from having not done anything on immigration reform, will feel that he has to act through executive action,” Florida Republican Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart told the Washington Post last week.

Obama is staying coy about his intentions. “We’re going to review it one more time,” Obama said last week of the DHS review, “to see if there’s more that we can do to make it more consistent with common sense and more consistent with I think the attitudes of the American people, which is we shouldn’t be in the business necessarily of tearing families apart who otherwise are law-abiding.”

For activists still searching for signs of hope, the answer seemed to contain a warning to Republicans: Help fix the broken immigration system, or the President will do it without you.

Categories: Magazines

Russia Accuses Ukraine of Violating Agreement

Mon, 04/21/2014 - 12:53

Russia’s top diplomat accused Ukraine’s interim government Monday of violating the international agreement struck last week to ratchet down tensions between the two bordering countries.

“[The agreement] is not only not being fulfilled, but steps are being taken, primarily by those who seized power in Kiev, that are grossly breaching the agreement reached in Geneva,” Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said Monday, the New York Times reports.

Secretary of State John Kerry brokered a deal Thursday between Ukraine and Russia in Geneva that called for the disarmament of pro-Russia militia groups in eastern Ukraine and an end to violence and intimidation.

Lavrov denied accusations that Russia, which currently has an estimated 40,000 troops near the Ukraine-Russia border, used the conflict in Ukraine as a justification to annex its Crimean Peninsula. He also responded to warnings from the Obama Administration that the U.S. would impose sanctions on Russia if the country did not try to ease tensions in eastern Ukraine.

“Before giving us ultimatums, demanding that we fulfill demands within two or three days with the threat of sanctions, we would urgently call on our American partners to fully accept responsibility for those who they brought to power,” Lavrov said.

[NYT]

Categories: Magazines

What’s Happening with Uncharted and The Last of Us Developer Naughty Dog?

Mon, 04/21/2014 - 12:47

I wish I knew. First Amy Hennig — who I’ve interviewed, and who’s arguably the creative lifeblood of the Uncharted series (she directed or co-directed all three installments) — leaves Naughty Dog, or winds up forced out, depending who you talk to (Naughty Dog co-president Evan Wells claims the separation was, in fact, amicable). That made headlines in early March. Then “Uncharted 4″ (or whatever it’s ultimately called) director Justin Richmond follows Hennig’s lead and exits the studio to work on League of Legends with developer Riot Games.

And now Nate Wells is saying his farewells. Wells — no relation to Naughty Dog co-president Evan, as far as I know — worked as lead artist on The Last of Us, a game that went on to win pretty much every award a video game can. Prior to working at Naughty Dog, Wells was the lead artist on Irrational Games’ BioShock Infinite, where he served until August 2012, leaving Irrational to work on The Last of Us at Naughty Dog. (A remastered version of the latter for Sony’s PlayStation 4 is due later this year.)

Here’s Wells (Nate) confirming his new digs on Twitter last night:

Hmmm….seem to be some threads here. Yes, I joined the wild, wacky, and ultimately brilliant folks at #GiantSparrow on April 3rd.—
Nate Wells (@PrettyLarceny) April 21, 2014

Wells is now working at studio Giant Sparrow, the folks behind PS3-exclusive adventure game The Unfinished Swan.

I can’t imagine any of this bodes well. Naughty Dog’s lost the director of its next big Uncharted game, the director and creative lead for all its prior Uncharted games and the lead artist on its most critically acclaimed game to date (The Last of Us), all in the space of two months.

[Gamespot]

Categories: Magazines

Prince George Goes to the Zoo and Meets a Marsupial Named After Him

Mon, 04/21/2014 - 12:45

In continuation of their Australia tour, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge brought baby Prince George to Sydney’s Taronga Zoo on Sunday after attending an Easter service.

There, Prince George was introduced to another George: one of the zoo’s bilbies, a desert-dwelling marsupial which was named after the prince. The family spent some time admiring the small furry, long-eared animal together from just outside the enclosure.

When George was handed a stuffed replica of the animal George, he elicited chuckles by immediately throwing it aside.

We get it, George—we’d want the real thing too.

Categories: Magazines

Shooting Reported at Federal Courthouse in Utah

Mon, 04/21/2014 - 12:41

(SALT LAKE CITY) — A spokeswoman for the U.S. attorney in Utah says a shooting has left at least one person injured at a federal courthouse in downtown Salt Lake City.

Salt Lake City police were called to the U.S. District Court building about 9:45 a.m. Monday, and witnesses told the Salt Lake Tribune they saw someone carried out of the courthouse on a stretcher.

U.S. attorney’s office spokeswoman Melodie Rydalch said the shooting happened in connection with a gang-related trial.

Rydalch didn’t immediately say if the shooter was in custody.

The case was being heard in U.S. District Judge Tena Campbell’s courtroom.

Categories: Magazines

American Meb Keflezighi Wins Boston Marathon

Mon, 04/21/2014 - 12:30

(BOSTON) — American Meb Keflezighi has won the Boston Marathon, a year after a bombing at the finish line left three dead and more than 260 people injured.

Keflezighi is a former New York City Marathon champion and Olympic medalist. He ran the 26.2 miles from Hopkinton to the finish on Boylston Street in Boston’s Back Bay on Monday in 2 hours, 8 minutes, 37 seconds.

Keflezighi held off Wilson Chebet of Kenya who finished 11 seconds behind. The 38-year-old from San Diego looked over his shoulder several times over the final mile. After realizing he wouldn’t be caught, he raised his sunglasses, began pumping his right fist and made the sign of the cross.

No U.S. runner had won the race since Lisa Larsen-Weidenbach took the women’s title in 1985; the last American man to win was Greg Meyer in 1983.

Categories: Magazines

Holder: U.S. To Make More Convicts Eligible for Presidential Clemency

Mon, 04/21/2014 - 12:29

The Obama Administration continued its push to reduce the number of prisoners serving long sentences as a result of the nation’s federal drug laws on Monday with an announcement by Attorney General Eric Holder describing new rules that would expand the pool of convicts eligible to apply for presidential clemency.

In a video released by the Department of Justice, Holder said they will expand the existing criteria government attorneys use to consider which offenders may be eligible for clemency. Later this week Deputy Attorney General James Cole will announce the new criteria, which Holder expects will lead thousands to apply to receive reduced sentences.

“This new and improved approach will make the criteria for clemency recommendation more expansive,” Holder said. “This will allow the Department of Justice and the president to consider requests from a larger field of eligible individuals.”

Throughout 2013, the Obama Administration began taking a piecemeal approach to reforming the nation’s drug laws as a part of Obama’s “Smart on Crime” initiative. In late 2013, Obama commuted the sentences of eight crack-cocaine offenders who had been serving lengthy sentences that would have been shortened under updated legislation. And last week, Obama commuted the sentence of another former drug prisoner whose sentence was lengthened as a result of a typo.

Former pardon attorneys and experts have said many of prisoners with similar cases are currently serving lengthy sentences, and Holder said Monday he expects “thousands” of applications for clemency as a result of the expanded criteria. Both the White House and the Justice Department have so far declined to estimate the number of clemencies the new criteria and increase in applications could produce.

In order to keep up with the influx of applications, Holder says the Department of Justice will assign more lawyers to review the applications. “As a society, we pay much too high a price whenever our system fails to deliver the just outcomes necessary to deter and punish crime, to keep us safe, and to ensure that those who have paid their debts have a chance to become productive citizens,” Holder said. “Our expanded clemency application process will aid in this effort. And it will advance the aims of our innovative new Smart on Crime initiative – to strengthen the criminal justice system, promote public safety, and deliver on the promise of equal justice under law.”

 

Categories: Magazines

Have Your Own Year of No Sugar

Mon, 04/21/2014 - 12:26

Dr. Robert Lustig is an unassuming-looking fellow with a medium build, gray hair and a laser-like focus. He’s good with Power Point and is comfortable throwing about phrases like “multivariate linear regression analysis.” As his YouTube video “Sugar: The Bitter Truth” opens, he stands at a lectern in an anonymous looking hall, looking every bit like that professor whose chemistry lectures put you to sleep every time. You’d never suspect that a 90-minute educational lecture from this man could generate some three and a half million hits, but that’s just what happened.

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In the first 17 minutes, Lustig calmly drops facts like precision bombs:

  • as a society we all weigh 25 pounds more than our counterparts did 25 years ago
  • even as our total fat consumption has gone down, our obesity has continued to accelerate
  • Americans are currently consuming 63 pounds per person of high fructose corn syrup per year
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But it isn’t until minute 20 that Lustig throws down the gauntlet: “My charge before the end of tonight is to demonstrate that fructose is a poison.”

And thus was born our family’s Year of No Sugar.

The concept was simple: We were not eating added sugar. We would not eat it in the house, we would not eat it with a mouse. No white sugar, brown sugar, cane sugar, molasses, maple syrup, honey, evaporated cane syrup, agave, brown rice syrup, artificial sweeteners of all stripes and no…not even fruit juice. Naturally occurring sugar — such as that contained in a piece of fruit — was fine, containing as it did all the beneficial fiber and micronutrients, and naturally limited the amount we ate — you’d get full before you could eat enough fructose to worry about.

But, in the interest of family harmony, we would have some exceptions too, number one being: As a family, we would pick one dessert per month to have which contained sugar. If it was your birthday that month, you got to pick the dessert.

Up until the year of the experiment, we — myself, my husband, and our two daughters Greta and Ilsa — were a fairly normal family when it came to food, I think. Perhaps a bit on the liberal-organic-dirt-worshipping-side, but nevertheless, still fairly middle of the road. We ate meat. We liked snacks. We liked desserts. Life is short, I reasoned, and although I have my requisite worried-Vermont-mom concerns, (hormone free beef? GMO corn? pesticides in the potatoes?) I tried to keep them in check. I didn’t want my kids growing up being afraid to live.

So, short of going to live under a rock, what can we do? How do we learn to be “moderate” in a culture that is, every minute of every day trying to convince us that moderation is whatever you want it to be?

Although we are no longer Sugar Abstainers, these days the four of us are what I’d call Sugar Avoiders of the First Degree. Here are a few of the things our family took away from our Year of No Sugar:

Number one: don’t drink sugar. If we change nothing else in our culture, we should do this one thing. Not only will we be far healthier, but we’ll begin to realize what we are up against in the Sugar Wars: the ubiquity of sugar, the elevated degree of sweetness we’ve been trained to expect. Tellingly, this cuts out most of our society’s popular options: soda, juice, sugared teas, sports drinks, vitamin waters. What’s left? Water. Lots of water. More water. Milk. Unsweetened tea and coffee. And, due to its vanishingly small percentage of fructose, I hereby give you permission to include wine. You’re welcome.

Number two: read ingredients, always. We have come to a point where it has become all too clear we cannot trust the food industry to have our best interests at heart. The more packages, boxes and bags you read, the more amazed you will be at the number of things you buy, things that are not even sweet, that contain added sugar in all its myriad guises and aliases. Think you know your favorite tomato sauce? Chicken broth? Salad dressing? Cold cuts? I’d be willing to bet if you look closely, you’re going to be surprised. The good news is there’s almost always another brand, further down the shelf, that doesn’t contain that sneaky ingredient, if you take the time to find it.

Number three: order simply in restaurants and don’t be afraid to ask. Once you start to ask, you’ll be amazed at how much restaurant food has added sugar in it. And that’s assuming the staff even knows what’s in their own food, which is not always the case. The usual suspects? Dressings, glazes, broths, marinades and always, always the sauce.

Number four: make sugar special. Skip the crappy cookies someone brought to the office. Try having oatmeal with bananas and raisins on top instead of brown sugar. Save your sweet tooth for that oh-so-special something that’s really worth, you know, consuming a little bit of poison for.

Eve O. Schaub is the author of Year of No Sugar.

Categories: Magazines

A Rare Look Inside an Apple Data Center

Mon, 04/21/2014 - 12:12

Yet more proof that Apple is not quite as secretive as it once was, when it thinks openness is in its own interest: The company showed off one of its data centers, in Sparks, Nevada, to Wired’s Stephen Levy for a good piece on its renewable-energy efforts. They’re led by Lisa Jackson, a former administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency.

Ninety-four percent of the power at Apple’s corporate campus and server farms is now renewable, provided by sources such as solar, wind and hydroelectric energy. One hundred percent of the power at Apple’s own data centers — it also uses co-location facilities owned by others — is renewable.

Both Google and Facebook are also aiming for 100% renewable data centers, but have a long way left to go. However, since Apple, unlike those companies, is primarily a producer of physical objects, being environmentally correct involves a different set of challenges and a lot more than data:

Aluminum is huge for Apple—it’s the main material in laptops, phones and iPads. Thus the impact of mining and processing that metal makes up for a substantial part of Apple’s carbon footprint. That’s why Jackson took notice last year when an engineer told her that he felt something wasn’t right with the way Apple measured that impact. Later, a second engineer reported similar suspicions. In her telling, Jackson could have dismissed this disquiet by noting that Apple was simply conforming to the standard methods of measuring the damage in a given process. But she encouraged efforts at Apple to revisit those standards. Indeed, Apple’s reexamination discovered that using the conventional yardstick, it was dramatically underestimating the emissions its aluminum use was dumping into the atmosphere—by a factor of four. Apple had to adjust its figures to reflect this. As a result, the company did not fulfill its expectation that its carbon footprint would be ten percent smaller in 2013 than previous years—it was nine percent larger. Apple would have to work harder to make its goals.

Levy’s story is full of intriguing nuggets, but one item a lot of people are probably wondering about goes unmentioned. He says that the only thing about his data-center visit Apple told him he couldn’t share with the world was the name of the manufacturer of the servers that power it. All he can disclose is that “they are not Mac Mini’s or anything else that you’d buy in an Apple store.”

Categories: Magazines

Even Advanced Biofuels May Not Be So Green

Mon, 04/21/2014 - 12:11
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Back in 2008, TIME published a controversial cover story with a simple line: The Clean Energy Myth. TIME’s Michael Grunwald made a damning case against the ethanol industry, arguing that the massive subsidies for biofuels intended to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by cutting demand for oil actually had the opposite environmental effect:

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“The basic problem with most biofuels is amazingly simple, given that researchers have ignored it until now: using land to grow fuel leads to the destruction of forests, wetlands and grasslands that store enormous amounts of carbon.”

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The years since have seen rounds of opposing studies on the environmental effects of bioenergy, even as the amount of biofuel produced has continued to rise. The U.S. is expected to use almost 5 billion bushels of corn to produce over 13 billion gallons of ethanol this year, thanks chiefly to government mandates. But research has also linked the use of crops like corn and soybeans as fuel to the rise in global food prices in recent years. (In 2013, four of every ten bushels of corn producing in the U.S. went to ethanol, almost as much as was used to feed livestock.) And improving gas mileage and rising production of domestic oil—thanks to the recent shale boom—have undercut the argument that biofuels are needed for energy independence.

Still, biofuel advocates have always pointed to the development of second-generation biofuels that will get around some of those environmental drawbacks by using the waste products of crops like corn or by tapping non-food plants like switchgrass or wood chips. Though those next-generation cellulosic fuels have proven difficult to develop on a commercial scale—it’s been chemically challenging to tap the energy locked in cellulose—there has been some progress recently, with major cellulosic ethanol plants from companies like DuPont and Abengoa Bioenergy.

But now it turns out that even next-generation biofuels may be worse for the climate than the fossil fuel-based sources they’re meant to replace. A new federally-funded study published in Nature Climate Change has found that biofuels made from corn waste release 7% more greenhouse gases over the short term than gasoline. That’s because by using corn waste like stalks and cobs as a fuel source, farmers aren’t letting the plant residue remain in their fields, when over time it would enrich the soil with carbon. The carbon gained by swapping out gasoline with next-generation ethanol made from corn waste doesn’t make up for the additional carbon lost by the soil. While next-generation biofuels are better for the climate over the long term, the study concludes they’re not green enough to meet federal standards for subsidies, which require cellulosic ethanol to produce at least 60% less carbon than gasoline. And without those subsidies—which amount to $1 per gallon—the nascent advanced biofuel industry could be smothered in the crib.

That should be extremely worrying to the biofuel industry, which has been counting on the growth of advanced biofuels as subsidies for corn ethanol are phased out. The Renewable Fuels Association—an ethanol trade group—was quick to criticize the Nature Climate Change study, noting that earlier research concluded that corn residue could be removed for fuel without reducing the amount of carbon in soil. And Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) spokesperson Liz Purchia said in a statement that the study “does not provide useful information to the life-cycle greenhouse gas emission from corn stover ethanol.” University of Nebraska Professor Adam Liska, who led the Nature Climate Change study, noted that using some of the corn residue to produce electricity—where it could help replace far dirtier coal—could make next-generation biofuels greener. So could the adoption of other cellulosic sources, or even algae. But most of the next-generation biofuel plants that are close to completion will be using corn residue as an early fuel source.

The reality is that the biofuel industry is in trouble. For the first time ever, the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change explicitly warned about the environmental risks of uncontrolled biofuel development in its most recent report on global warming. Given the political power of the farmers who directly benefit from ethanol subsidies—and the paucity of other immediate options to reduce the climate impact of transportation—biofuels aren’t going away. But the industry has a long way to go before it can prove that biofuels—even next-generation options—aren’t a clean energy myth.

Categories: Magazines

Kenya’s Rita Jeptoo Wins Boston Marathon Again

Mon, 04/21/2014 - 12:04

(BOSTON) — Rita Jeptoo of Kenya successfully defended the Boston Marathon title she said she could not enjoy a year ago after the fatal bombings.

Jeptoo finished Monday’s race in a course-record 2 hours, 18 minutes, 57 seconds. She becomes the seventh three-time Boston Marathon champion.

Jeptoo broke away from a group of five runners at the 23-mile mark. Buzunesh Deba finished second with an unofficial time of 2:19:59.

American Shalane Flanagan finished fifth after leading for more than half the race. She took a gamble by setting the early pace. She ran her first mile in 5 minutes, 11 seconds, but fell back on the Newton Hills about 21 miles into the race.

Categories: Magazines

Kentucky Inmate Starves To Death

Mon, 04/21/2014 - 12:02

(LOUISVILLE, Ky.) — One doctor has been fired and another is being dismissed from the Kentucky State Penitentiary after an inmate went on a hunger strike and committed suicide by starving himself to death.

According to documents obtained by The Associated Press, the Department of Corrections terminated physician Steve Hiland and will soon cut loose psychologist Jean Hinkebein. The firings stem from the Jan. 13 death of 57-year-old James Kenneth Embry, who was serving a nine-year sentence for drug offenses.

An internal investigation done by the Corrections Department concluded that the doctors missed multiple signs that Embry was slowly committing suicide by refusing food and that Hiland signed off on nurses’ notes without seeing patients.

Hiland has denied wrongdoing. Hinkebein declined to comment.

The Kentucky Attorney General’s Office is conducting a criminal review of Embry’s death.

Categories: Magazines

Women Named Jennifer Are Gold Diggers According to Dubious Survey

Mon, 04/21/2014 - 11:59
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If you’re bachelor with cash to spare, you should stay away from women names Jennifer, according to a sexist and highly suspect new survey. DirtSearch.org, a background check service, skimmed through their data to find the most-searched female names on their site that had petty crime records. Then the good people at Dirt Search decided that women who’d had trouble with the law must surely be gold diggers and took it upon themselves to warn wealthy men to be on the look out for Jennifers, Jessicas and other suspiciously named women.

The Daily Mail published the list of most common “gold digger” names as follows:

1. Jennifer

2. Jessica

3. Michelle

4. Lisa

5. Ashley

6. Amanda

7. Melissa

8. Stephanie

9. Nicole

10. Angela

Sorry, J-Law, J Woww and Jennifer Aniston. Looks like you’re not going to be able to fulfill your dreams of marrying rich. Husbands of Jennifer Lopez, Jennifer Garner and Jennifer Connelly: I hope you got a prenup. All other Jennifers: don’t even try to get on Millionaire Matchmaker this season.

One more note: the DirtSearch list is pretty close to the most popular women’s names from 1985. (I chose that year randomly—women born that year would be 29 now. I’m fairly certain if you cross reference this list with other years around the age, you would find a similar overlap.) I’ve bolded the names that are on both lists. Turns out the most-searched names on a background check website also were the most popular girl baby names in the mid-1980s.

1. Jessica

2. Ashley

3. Jennifer

4. Amanda

5. Sarah

6. Stephanie

7. Nicole

8. Heather

9. Elizabeth

10. Megan

So maybe don’t breakup with your girlfriend named Jennifer quite yet, men.

Categories: Magazines

Washington Mudslide Death Toll Rises to 41

Mon, 04/21/2014 - 11:58

The death toll from a March mudslide in Washington state has risen to 41, officials said Monday.

The Snohomish County Medical Examiner’s Office has identified and released the names of 39 victims so far, and it’s working on identifying the remaining bodies.

“We are working closely with the families of the remaining missing and extend our most heartfelt sympathies to the family and friends during this difficult time,” the office said in a statement on its website.

The mudslide destroyed more than two dozen homes when it occurred on the outskirts of Oso, a small town about 50 miles northeast of Seattle, on March 22.

Categories: Magazines

Couple Asks Internet to Name Their Baby, Somehow Doesn’t End Up With Child Called “Kids’R’Gross”

Mon, 04/21/2014 - 11:46

A few months back, a couple decided to turn to the Internet to name their baby. Their reasoning was never really clear, but their motivation probably fell somewhere on the spectrum between “Why the hell not?” and “Yeah, we’re bored so let’s just do this.”

So they set up NameMyDaughter.com and then casually placed the link on Reddit, inviting the online community to submit their ideas and ultimately vote for the winning moniker. Naturally, things escalated quickly. Sure, names like Leslie and Renee were thrown into the mix, but Megatron, Not Zelda, Salad and Streetlamp also topped the list. (Does that surprise anyone? Please raise your hand if that surprises you at all.)

The baby was born this month and the results are in. Her name is Amelia Savannah Joy McLaughlin, which is a real name, fit for a real human! This part is surprising.

To be fair, the father clarified that he and his wife would make the final decision, so it’s possible that Amelia wasn’t the true winner in the poll and they simply chose it over “Salad” because they’re not monsters.

(h/t Betabeat)

Categories: Magazines