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Why security professionals need to get more creative with penetration testing (and how to do it)

Computerworld News - Fri, 04/18/2014 - 10:59
Security professionals have long been running penetration tests against their firewalls and other security systems to find weaknesses that need to be addressed.
Categories: IT News

The Internet of Things and Humans

Slashdot - Fri, 04/18/2014 - 10:57
An anonymous reader writes "Speculating the future of human computer interaction, Tim O'Reilly contemplates how humans and things cooperate differently when things get smarter. He says, '[S]o many of the most interesting applications of the Internet of Things involve new ways of thinking about how humans and things cooperate differently when the things get smarter. It really ought to be called the Internet of Things and Humans ... is Uber an #IoT application? Most people would say it is not; it’s just a pair of smartphone apps connecting a passenger and driver. But imagine for a moment the consumer end of the Uber app as it is today, and on the other end, a self-driving car. You would immediately see that as #IoT. ... Long before we get to fully autonomous devices, there are many “halfway house” applications that are really Internet of Things applications in waiting, which use humans for one or more parts of the entire system. When you understand that the general pattern of #IoTH applications is not just sensor + network + actuator but various combinations of human + network + actuator or sensor + network, you will broaden the possibilities for interfaces and business models."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

Meet the Most Profitable PC Company You've Never Heard Of

Computerworld News - Fri, 04/18/2014 - 10:47
Dell's Original Equipment Manufacturer division makes custom PCs for companies in a variety of industries. It also makes money. With sales of plain ol' out-of-the-box machines on the decline, this might point to the future of the PC.
Categories: IT News

With $4.6M In New Funding, Preact Helps Software Companies Keep Customers Happy

TechCrunch - Fri, 04/18/2014 - 10:39
 Startup Preact is officially launching today with a product that it says can help companies increase customer spending and reduce churn. It's also announcing that it has raised a $4.6 million Series A led by Trinity Ventures. CEO Michael Geller said the Preact system looks at a variety of signals and uses data science to help subscription software companies identify when their customers are… Read More
Categories: IT News

App Search Engine Quixey Acquires Competing Service Kite.io

TechCrunch - Fri, 04/18/2014 - 10:21
 Mobile app search engine Quixey, backed by $75 million from Alibaba, Innovation Endeavors, Translink Capital and others, has put some of those dollars to use by acquiring a smaller, competing app search startup, San Francisco-based Kite.io. The deal was more of a talent grab, we hear, bringing Kite.io’s founders to Quixey where they’ll continue to help the company build out its… Read More
Categories: IT News

Investors Value Yahoo's Core Business At Less Than $0

Slashdot - Fri, 04/18/2014 - 10:15
An anonymous reader writes "Yahoo is most known for its search, email, and news services. But its U.S. web presence is only part of its corporate portfolio. It also owns large stakes in Yahoo Japan and Alibaba (a web services company based in China). Yahoo Japan is publicly traded, and Alibaba is heading toward an IPO, so both have a pretty firm valuation. The thing is: when you account for Yahoo's share of each and subtract them from Yahoo's current market cap, you get a negative number. Investors actually value Yahoo's core business at less than nothing. Bloomberg's Matt Levine explains: 'I guess this is fairly obvious, but it leads you to a general theory of the conglomerate discount, which is that a business can be worth less than zero (to shareholders), but a company can't be (to shareholders). ... A fun question is, as fiduciaries for shareholders, should Yahoo's directors split into three separate companies to maximize value? If YJHI and YAHI are worth around $9 billion and $40 billion, and Core Yahoo Inc. is worth around, I don't know, one penny, then just doing some corporate restructuring should create $13 billion in free shareholder value. Why not do that?'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

With Google Glass, the doctor can see you now

Computerworld News - Fri, 04/18/2014 - 10:01
Emergency room physicians at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center are four months into a pilot program where they are using Google's computerized eyeglasses to help treat patients.
Categories: IT News

Americans cool with lab-grown organs, but not designer babies

Network World - Fri, 04/18/2014 - 09:57
Americans are optimistic about scientific inventions on the horizon, though are cautious about future uses of DNA, robots, drones and always-on implants, according to the latest Pew Research Center survey on future technology.
Categories: IT News

LinkedIn Hits 300 Million Users

TechCrunch - Fri, 04/18/2014 - 09:40
 LinkedIn announced this morning that the company now has 300 million registered users worldwide, over half of which come from outside the U.S. Stateside, the site has 100 million members, its says. LinkedIn revealed these and other figures via a company blog post, in addition to laying out its vision for growing its presence through strategic initiatives on mobile, in Asia, and beyond. These… Read More
Categories: IT News

Mathematicians Devise Typefaces Based On Problems of Computational Geometry

Slashdot - Fri, 04/18/2014 - 09:33
KentuckyFC writes: "Typeface design is something of an art. For many centuries, this art has been constrained by the materials available to typographers, mainly lead and wood. More recently, typographers have been freed from this constraint with the advent of digital typesetting and the number of typefaces has mushroomed. Verdana, for example, is designed specifically for computer screens. Now a father and son team of mathematicians have devised a number of typefaces based on problems they have studied in computational geometry. For example, one typeface is inspired by the folds and valleys generated by computational origami designs. Another is based on the open problem of 'whether every disjoint set of unit disks (gears or wheels) in the plane can be visited by a single taut non-self-intersecting conveyor belt.' Interestingly, several of the new typefaces also serve as puzzles in which messages are the solutions."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

Mathematicians Devise Typefaces Based On Problems of Computational Geometry

Slashdot - Fri, 04/18/2014 - 09:33
KentuckyFC writes: "Typeface design is something of an art. For many centuries, this art has been constrained by the materials available to typographers, mainly lead and wood. More recently, typographers have been freed from this constraint with the advent of digital typesetting and the number of typefaces has mushroomed. Verdana, for example, is designed specifically for computer screens. Now a father and son team of mathematicians have devised a number of typefaces based on problems they have studied in computational geometry. For example, one typeface is inspired by the folds and valleys generated by computational origami designs. Another is based on the open problem of 'whether every disjoint set of unit disks (gears or wheels) in the plane can be visited by a single taut non-self-intersecting conveyor belt.' Interestingly, several of the new typefaces also serve as puzzles in which messages are the solutions."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

Mathematicians Devise Typefaces Based On Problems of Computational Geometry

Slashdot - Fri, 04/18/2014 - 09:33
KentuckyFC writes: "Typeface design is something of an art. For many centuries, this art has been constrained by the materials available to typographers, mainly lead and wood. More recently, typographers have been freed from this constraint with the advent of digital typesetting and the number of typefaces has mushroomed. Verdana, for example, is designed specifically for computer screens. Now a father and son team of mathematicians have devised a number of typefaces based on problems they have studied in computational geometry. For example, one typeface is inspired by the folds and valleys generated by computational origami designs. Another is based on the open problem of 'whether every disjoint set of unit disks (gears or wheels) in the plane can be visited by a single taut non-self-intersecting conveyor belt.' Interestingly, several of the new typefaces also serve as puzzles in which messages are the solutions."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

Mathematicians Devise Typefaces Based On Problems of Computational Geometry

Slashdot - Fri, 04/18/2014 - 09:33
KentuckyFC writes: "Typeface design is something of an art. For many centuries, this art has been constrained by the materials available to typographers, mainly lead and wood. More recently, typographers have been freed from this constraint with the advent of digital typesetting and the number of typefaces has mushroomed. Verdana, for example, is designed specifically for computer screens. Now a father and son team of mathematicians have devised a number of typefaces based on problems they have studied in computational geometry. For example, one typeface is inspired by the folds and valleys generated by computational origami designs. Another is based on the open problem of 'whether every disjoint set of unit disks (gears or wheels) in the plane can be visited by a single taut non-self-intersecting conveyor belt.' Interestingly, several of the new typefaces also serve as puzzles in which messages are the solutions."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

Mathematicians Devise Typefaces Based On Problems of Computational Geometry

Slashdot - Fri, 04/18/2014 - 09:33
KentuckyFC writes: "Typeface design is something of an art. For many centuries, this art has been constrained by the materials available to typographers, mainly lead and wood. More recently, typographers have been freed from this constraint with the advent of digital typesetting and the number of typefaces has mushroomed. Verdana, for example, is designed specifically for computer screens. Now a father and son team of mathematicians have devised a number of typefaces based on problems they have studied in computational geometry. For example, one typeface is inspired by the folds and valleys generated by computational origami designs. Another is based on the open problem of 'whether every disjoint set of unit disks (gears or wheels) in the plane can be visited by a single taut non-self-intersecting conveyor belt.' Interestingly, several of the new typefaces also serve as puzzles in which messages are the solutions."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

Mathematicians Devise Typefaces Based On Problems of Computational Geometry

Slashdot - Fri, 04/18/2014 - 09:33
KentuckyFC writes: "Typeface design is something of an art. For many centuries, this art has been constrained by the materials available to typographers, mainly lead and wood. More recently, typographers have been freed from this constraint with the advent of digital typesetting and the number of typefaces has mushroomed. Verdana, for example, is designed specifically for computer screens. Now a father and son team of mathematicians have devised a number of typefaces based on problems they have studied in computational geometry. For example, one typeface is inspired by the folds and valleys generated by computational origami designs. Another is based on the open problem of 'whether every disjoint set of unit disks (gears or wheels) in the plane can be visited by a single taut non-self-intersecting conveyor belt.' Interestingly, several of the new typefaces also serve as puzzles in which messages are the solutions."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

Mathematicians Devise Typefaces Based On Problems of Computational Geometry

Slashdot - Fri, 04/18/2014 - 09:33
KentuckyFC writes: "Typeface design is something of an art. For many centuries, this art has been constrained by the materials available to typographers, mainly lead and wood. More recently, typographers have been freed from this constraint with the advent of digital typesetting and the number of typefaces has mushroomed. Verdana, for example, is designed specifically for computer screens. Now a father and son team of mathematicians have devised a number of typefaces based on problems they have studied in computational geometry. For example, one typeface is inspired by the folds and valleys generated by computational origami designs. Another is based on the open problem of 'whether every disjoint set of unit disks (gears or wheels) in the plane can be visited by a single taut non-self-intersecting conveyor belt.' Interestingly, several of the new typefaces also serve as puzzles in which messages are the solutions."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

Mathematicians Devise Typefaces Based On Problems of Computational Geometry

Slashdot - Fri, 04/18/2014 - 09:33
KentuckyFC writes: "Typeface design is something of an art. For many centuries, this art has been constrained by the materials available to typographers, mainly lead and wood. More recently, typographers have been freed from this constraint with the advent of digital typesetting and the number of typefaces has mushroomed. Verdana, for example, is designed specifically for computer screens. Now a father and son team of mathematicians have devised a number of typefaces based on problems they have studied in computational geometry. For example, one typeface is inspired by the folds and valleys generated by computational origami designs. Another is based on the open problem of 'whether every disjoint set of unit disks (gears or wheels) in the plane can be visited by a single taut non-self-intersecting conveyor belt.' Interestingly, several of the new typefaces also serve as puzzles in which messages are the solutions."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

Mathematicians Devise Typefaces Based On Problems of Computational Geometry

Slashdot - Fri, 04/18/2014 - 09:33
KentuckyFC writes: "Typeface design is something of an art. For many centuries, this art has been constrained by the materials available to typographers, mainly lead and wood. More recently, typographers have been freed from this constraint with the advent of digital typesetting and the number of typefaces has mushroomed. Verdana, for example, is designed specifically for computer screens. Now a father and son team of mathematicians have devised a number of typefaces based on problems they have studied in computational geometry. For example, one typeface is inspired by the folds and valleys generated by computational origami designs. Another is based on the open problem of 'whether every disjoint set of unit disks (gears or wheels) in the plane can be visited by a single taut non-self-intersecting conveyor belt.' Interestingly, several of the new typefaces also serve as puzzles in which messages are the solutions."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

Mathematicians Devise Typefaces Based On Problems of Computational Geometry

Slashdot - Fri, 04/18/2014 - 09:33
KentuckyFC writes: "Typeface design is something of an art. For many centuries, this art has been constrained by the materials available to typographers, mainly lead and wood. More recently, typographers have been freed from this constraint with the advent of digital typesetting and the number of typefaces has mushroomed. Verdana, for example, is designed specifically for computer screens. Now a father and son team of mathematicians have devised a number of typefaces based on problems they have studied in computational geometry. For example, one typeface is inspired by the folds and valleys generated by computational origami designs. Another is based on the open problem of 'whether every disjoint set of unit disks (gears or wheels) in the plane can be visited by a single taut non-self-intersecting conveyor belt.' Interestingly, several of the new typefaces also serve as puzzles in which messages are the solutions."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

Mathematicians Devise Typefaces Based On Problems of Computational Geometry

Slashdot - Fri, 04/18/2014 - 09:33
KentuckyFC writes: "Typeface design is something of an art. For many centuries, this art has been constrained by the materials available to typographers, mainly lead and wood. More recently, typographers have been freed from this constraint with the advent of digital typesetting and the number of typefaces has mushroomed. Verdana, for example, is designed specifically for computer screens. Now a father and son team of mathematicians have devised a number of typefaces based on problems they have studied in computational geometry. For example, one typeface is inspired by the folds and valleys generated by computational origami designs. Another is based on the open problem of 'whether every disjoint set of unit disks (gears or wheels) in the plane can be visited by a single taut non-self-intersecting conveyor belt.' Interestingly, several of the new typefaces also serve as puzzles in which messages are the solutions."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News
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