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IT News

FireChat ignites new way to communicate on phones

Associated Press Top Technology Stories - Thu, 04/03/2014 - 12:08
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- A new mobile messaging application called FireChat is empowering nearby smartphone users to stay in touch even when there's no cellular service or Internet connection....
Categories: IT News

Intel taps China's 'white box' makers to fuel tablet chip business

Network World - Thu, 04/03/2014 - 12:04
As big name vendors prepare Intel-powered tablets this year, the U.S. chip maker is also courting little-known "white box" vendors in Shenzhen, China, for its tablet chips.
Categories: IT News

Data analytics startup SimpleQL suggests questions

Network World - Thu, 04/03/2014 - 12:02
SimpleQL thinks the best way to bring business intelligence to people who've never drilled into big data is to help them decide what they want to know.
Categories: IT News

FireChat Brings Its Anonymous Offline Chat Network To Android

TechCrunch - Thu, 04/03/2014 - 12:00
When Open Garden’s FireChat launched on iOS about two weeks ago, it created quite a bit of interest, not in the least because it is one of the first iOS 7 apps to use Apple’s Multipeer Connectivity Framework. With that, the app can use a mesh network of local iPhones to build a local chat network, even if there is no network connection around. Starting today, Android users can join in… Read More
Categories: IT News

Unity beta program helps game developers with Windows Phone 8.1

Network World - Thu, 04/03/2014 - 11:58
Game developers can prepare to create apps for Windows Phone 8.1 with a beta program from Unity Technologies.
Categories: IT News

Report Claims Google Is Exploring Offering Wireless Carrier Services

TechCrunch - Thu, 04/03/2014 - 11:55
Google is exploring launching a wireless carrier service, according to The Information. The report cites a meeting between Google and Verizon officials in which the possibility of a Google MVNO was discussed. Read More
Categories: IT News

How to 3D print your own designs without a 3D printer

Network World - Thu, 04/03/2014 - 11:45
In his keynote speech at the Inside 3D Printing conference in New York today, 3D Systems CEO Avi Reichental said that when he's asked if 3D printers will make their way into everyday people's homes, he can't answer them. That's because it's not a matter of if they'll make their way into the home – it's where in the home they'll put them, Reichental said.
Categories: IT News

Career advice: Learn from your mistakes

Computerworld News - Thu, 04/03/2014 - 11:42
Premier 100 IT Leader Doris Peek also answers questions on the value of education and of learning about the business.
Categories: IT News

NYU Group Says Its Scheme Makes Cracking Individual Passwords Impossible

Slashdot - Thu, 04/03/2014 - 11:28
An anonymous reader writes "Researchers at New York University have devised a new scheme called PolyPassHash for storing password hash data so that passwords cannot be individually cracked by an attacker. Instead of a password hash being stored directly in the database, the information is used to encode a share in a Shamir Secret Store (technical details PDF). This means that a password cannot be validated without recovering a threshold of shares, thus an attacker must crack groups of passwords together. The solution is fast, easy to implement (with C and Python implementations available), requires no changes to clients, and makes a huge difference in practice. To put the security difference into perspective, three random 6 character passwords that are stored using standard salted secure hashes can be cracked by a laptop in an hour. With a PolyPassHash store, it would take every computer on the planet longer to crack these passwords than the universe is estimated to exist. With this new technique, HoneyWords, and hardware solutions all available, does an organization have any excuse if their password database is disclosed and user passwords are cracked?."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

NYU Group Says Its Scheme Makes Cracking Individual Passwords Impossible

Slashdot - Thu, 04/03/2014 - 11:28
An anonymous reader writes "Researchers at New York University have devised a new scheme called PolyPassHash for storing password hash data so that passwords cannot be individually cracked by an attacker. Instead of a password hash being stored directly in the database, the information is used to encode a share in a Shamir Secret Store (technical details PDF). This means that a password cannot be validated without recovering a threshold of shares, thus an attacker must crack groups of passwords together. The solution is fast, easy to implement (with C and Python implementations available), requires no changes to clients, and makes a huge difference in practice. To put the security difference into perspective, three random 6 character passwords that are stored using standard salted secure hashes can be cracked by a laptop in an hour. With a PolyPassHash store, it would take every computer on the planet longer to crack these passwords than the universe is estimated to exist. With this new technique, HoneyWords, and hardware solutions all available, does an organization have any excuse if their password database is disclosed and user passwords are cracked?."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

NYU Group Says Its Scheme Makes Cracking Individual Passwords Impossible

Slashdot - Thu, 04/03/2014 - 11:28
An anonymous reader writes "Researchers at New York University have devised a new scheme called PolyPassHash for storing password hash data so that passwords cannot be individually cracked by an attacker. Instead of a password hash being stored directly in the database, the information is used to encode a share in a Shamir Secret Store (technical details PDF). This means that a password cannot be validated without recovering a threshold of shares, thus an attacker must crack groups of passwords together. The solution is fast, easy to implement (with C and Python implementations available), requires no changes to clients, and makes a huge difference in practice. To put the security difference into perspective, three random 6 character passwords that are stored using standard salted secure hashes can be cracked by a laptop in an hour. With a PolyPassHash store, it would take every computer on the planet longer to crack these passwords than the universe is estimated to exist. With this new technique, HoneyWords, and hardware solutions all available, does an organization have any excuse if their password database is disclosed and user passwords are cracked?."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

NYU Group Says Its Scheme Makes Cracking Individual Passwords Impossible

Slashdot - Thu, 04/03/2014 - 11:28
An anonymous reader writes "Researchers at New York University have devised a new scheme called PolyPassHash for storing password hash data so that passwords cannot be individually cracked by an attacker. Instead of a password hash being stored directly in the database, the information is used to encode a share in a Shamir Secret Store (technical details PDF). This means that a password cannot be validated without recovering a threshold of shares, thus an attacker must crack groups of passwords together. The solution is fast, easy to implement (with C and Python implementations available), requires no changes to clients, and makes a huge difference in practice. To put the security difference into perspective, three random 6 character passwords that are stored using standard salted secure hashes can be cracked by a laptop in an hour. With a PolyPassHash store, it would take every computer on the planet longer to crack these passwords than the universe is estimated to exist. With this new technique, HoneyWords, and hardware solutions all available, does an organization have any excuse if their password database is disclosed and user passwords are cracked?."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

NYU Group Says Its Scheme Makes Cracking Individual Passwords Impossible

Slashdot - Thu, 04/03/2014 - 11:28
An anonymous reader writes "Researchers at New York University have devised a new scheme called PolyPassHash for storing password hash data so that passwords cannot be individually cracked by an attacker. Instead of a password hash being stored directly in the database, the information is used to encode a share in a Shamir Secret Store (technical details PDF). This means that a password cannot be validated without recovering a threshold of shares, thus an attacker must crack groups of passwords together. The solution is fast, easy to implement (with C and Python implementations available), requires no changes to clients, and makes a huge difference in practice. To put the security difference into perspective, three random 6 character passwords that are stored using standard salted secure hashes can be cracked by a laptop in an hour. With a PolyPassHash store, it would take every computer on the planet longer to crack these passwords than the universe is estimated to exist. With this new technique, HoneyWords, and hardware solutions all available, does an organization have any excuse if their password database is disclosed and user passwords are cracked?."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

NYU Group Says Its Scheme Makes Cracking Individual Passwords Impossible

Slashdot - Thu, 04/03/2014 - 11:28
An anonymous reader writes "Researchers at New York University have devised a new scheme called PolyPassHash for storing password hash data so that passwords cannot be individually cracked by an attacker. Instead of a password hash being stored directly in the database, the information is used to encode a share in a Shamir Secret Store (technical details PDF). This means that a password cannot be validated without recovering a threshold of shares, thus an attacker must crack groups of passwords together. The solution is fast, easy to implement (with C and Python implementations available), requires no changes to clients, and makes a huge difference in practice. To put the security difference into perspective, three random 6 character passwords that are stored using standard salted secure hashes can be cracked by a laptop in an hour. With a PolyPassHash store, it would take every computer on the planet longer to crack these passwords than the universe is estimated to exist. With this new technique, HoneyWords, and hardware solutions all available, does an organization have any excuse if their password database is disclosed and user passwords are cracked?."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

NYU Group Says Its Scheme Makes Cracking Individual Passwords Impossible

Slashdot - Thu, 04/03/2014 - 11:28
An anonymous reader writes "Researchers at New York University have devised a new scheme called PolyPassHash for storing password hash data so that passwords cannot be individually cracked by an attacker. Instead of a password hash being stored directly in the database, the information is used to encode a share in a Shamir Secret Store (technical details PDF). This means that a password cannot be validated without recovering a threshold of shares, thus an attacker must crack groups of passwords together. The solution is fast, easy to implement (with C and Python implementations available), requires no changes to clients, and makes a huge difference in practice. To put the security difference into perspective, three random 6 character passwords that are stored using standard salted secure hashes can be cracked by a laptop in an hour. With a PolyPassHash store, it would take every computer on the planet longer to crack these passwords than the universe is estimated to exist. With this new technique, HoneyWords, and hardware solutions all available, does an organization have any excuse if their password database is disclosed and user passwords are cracked?."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

NYU Group Says Its Scheme Makes Cracking Individual Passwords Impossible

Slashdot - Thu, 04/03/2014 - 11:28
An anonymous reader writes "Researchers at New York University have devised a new scheme called PolyPassHash for storing password hash data so that passwords cannot be individually cracked by an attacker. Instead of a password hash being stored directly in the database, the information is used to encode a share in a Shamir Secret Store (technical details PDF). This means that a password cannot be validated without recovering a threshold of shares, thus an attacker must crack groups of passwords together. The solution is fast, easy to implement (with C and Python implementations available), requires no changes to clients, and makes a huge difference in practice. To put the security difference into perspective, three random 6 character passwords that are stored using standard salted secure hashes can be cracked by a laptop in an hour. With a PolyPassHash store, it would take every computer on the planet longer to crack these passwords than the universe is estimated to exist. With this new technique, HoneyWords, and hardware solutions all available, does an organization have any excuse if their password database is disclosed and user passwords are cracked?."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

NYU Group Says Its Scheme Makes Cracking Individual Passwords Impossible

Slashdot - Thu, 04/03/2014 - 11:28
An anonymous reader writes "Researchers at New York University have devised a new scheme called PolyPassHash for storing password hash data so that passwords cannot be individually cracked by an attacker. Instead of a password hash being stored directly in the database, the information is used to encode a share in a Shamir Secret Store (technical details PDF). This means that a password cannot be validated without recovering a threshold of shares, thus an attacker must crack groups of passwords together. The solution is fast, easy to implement (with C and Python implementations available), requires no changes to clients, and makes a huge difference in practice. To put the security difference into perspective, three random 6 character passwords that are stored using standard salted secure hashes can be cracked by a laptop in an hour. With a PolyPassHash store, it would take every computer on the planet longer to crack these passwords than the universe is estimated to exist. With this new technique, HoneyWords, and hardware solutions all available, does an organization have any excuse if their password database is disclosed and user passwords are cracked?."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

NYU Group Says Its Scheme Makes Cracking Individual Passwords Impossible

Slashdot - Thu, 04/03/2014 - 11:28
An anonymous reader writes "Researchers at New York University have devised a new scheme called PolyPassHash for storing password hash data so that passwords cannot be individually cracked by an attacker. Instead of a password hash being stored directly in the database, the information is used to encode a share in a Shamir Secret Store (technical details PDF). This means that a password cannot be validated without recovering a threshold of shares, thus an attacker must crack groups of passwords together. The solution is fast, easy to implement (with C and Python implementations available), requires no changes to clients, and makes a huge difference in practice. To put the security difference into perspective, three random 6 character passwords that are stored using standard salted secure hashes can be cracked by a laptop in an hour. With a PolyPassHash store, it would take every computer on the planet longer to crack these passwords than the universe is estimated to exist. With this new technique, HoneyWords, and hardware solutions all available, does an organization have any excuse if their password database is disclosed and user passwords are cracked?."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

NYU Group Says Its Scheme Makes Cracking Individual Passwords Impossible

Slashdot - Thu, 04/03/2014 - 11:28
An anonymous reader writes "Researchers at New York University have devised a new scheme called PolyPassHash for storing password hash data so that passwords cannot be individually cracked by an attacker. Instead of a password hash being stored directly in the database, the information is used to encode a share in a Shamir Secret Store (technical details PDF). This means that a password cannot be validated without recovering a threshold of shares, thus an attacker must crack groups of passwords together. The solution is fast, easy to implement (with C and Python implementations available), requires no changes to clients, and makes a huge difference in practice. To put the security difference into perspective, three random 6 character passwords that are stored using standard salted secure hashes can be cracked by a laptop in an hour. With a PolyPassHash store, it would take every computer on the planet longer to crack these passwords than the universe is estimated to exist. With this new technique, HoneyWords, and hardware solutions all available, does an organization have any excuse if their password database is disclosed and user passwords are cracked?."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

NYU Group Says Its Scheme Makes Cracking Individual Passwords Impossible

Slashdot - Thu, 04/03/2014 - 11:28
An anonymous reader writes "Researchers at New York University have devised a new scheme called PolyPassHash for storing password hash data so that passwords cannot be individually cracked by an attacker. Instead of a password hash being stored directly in the database, the information is used to encode a share in a Shamir Secret Store (technical details PDF). This means that a password cannot be validated without recovering a threshold of shares, thus an attacker must crack groups of passwords together. The solution is fast, easy to implement (with C and Python implementations available), requires no changes to clients, and makes a huge difference in practice. To put the security difference into perspective, three random 6 character passwords that are stored using standard salted secure hashes can be cracked by a laptop in an hour. With a PolyPassHash store, it would take every computer on the planet longer to crack these passwords than the universe is estimated to exist. With this new technique, HoneyWords, and hardware solutions all available, does an organization have any excuse if their password database is disclosed and user passwords are cracked?."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News
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