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P vs. NP Problem Linked To the Quantum Nature of the Universe

Slashdot - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 12:17
KentuckyFC writes: "One of the greatest mysteries in science is why we don't see quantum effects on the macroscopic scale; why Schrodinger's famous cat cannot be both alive and dead at the same time. Now one theorist says the answer is because P is NOT equal to NP. Here's the thinking: The equation that describes the state of any quantum object is called Schrodinger's equation. Physicists have always thought it can be used to describe everything in the universe, even large objects, and perhaps the universe itself. But the new idea is that this requires an additional assumption — that an efficient algorithm exists to solve the equation for complex macroscopic systems. But is this true? The new approach involves showing that the problem of solving Schrodinger's equation is NP-hard. So if macroscopic superpositions exist, there must be an algorithm that can solve this NP-hard problem quickly and efficiently. And because all NP-hard problems are mathematically equivalent, this algorithm must also be capable of solving all other NP-hard problems too, such as the traveling salesman problem. In other words, NP-hard problems are equivalent to the class of much easier problems called P. Or P=NP. But here's the thing: computational complexity theorists have good reason to think that P is not equal to NP (although they haven't yet proven it). If they're right, then macroscopic superpositions cannot exist, which explains why we do not (and cannot) observe them in the real world. Voila!"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

P vs. NP Problem Linked To the Quantum Nature of the Universe

Slashdot - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 12:17
KentuckyFC writes: "One of the greatest mysteries in science is why we don't see quantum effects on the macroscopic scale; why Schrodinger's famous cat cannot be both alive and dead at the same time. Now one theorist says the answer is because P is NOT equal to NP. Here's the thinking: The equation that describes the state of any quantum object is called Schrodinger's equation. Physicists have always thought it can be used to describe everything in the universe, even large objects, and perhaps the universe itself. But the new idea is that this requires an additional assumption — that an efficient algorithm exists to solve the equation for complex macroscopic systems. But is this true? The new approach involves showing that the problem of solving Schrodinger's equation is NP-hard. So if macroscopic superpositions exist, there must be an algorithm that can solve this NP-hard problem quickly and efficiently. And because all NP-hard problems are mathematically equivalent, this algorithm must also be capable of solving all other NP-hard problems too, such as the traveling salesman problem. In other words, NP-hard problems are equivalent to the class of much easier problems called P. Or P=NP. But here's the thing: computational complexity theorists have good reason to think that P is not equal to NP (although they haven't yet proven it). If they're right, then macroscopic superpositions cannot exist, which explains why we do not (and cannot) observe them in the real world. Voila!"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

P vs. NP Problem Linked To the Quantum Nature of the Universe

Slashdot - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 12:17
KentuckyFC writes: "One of the greatest mysteries in science is why we don't see quantum effects on the macroscopic scale; why Schrodinger's famous cat cannot be both alive and dead at the same time. Now one theorist says the answer is because P is NOT equal to NP. Here's the thinking: The equation that describes the state of any quantum object is called Schrodinger's equation. Physicists have always thought it can be used to describe everything in the universe, even large objects, and perhaps the universe itself. But the new idea is that this requires an additional assumption — that an efficient algorithm exists to solve the equation for complex macroscopic systems. But is this true? The new approach involves showing that the problem of solving Schrodinger's equation is NP-hard. So if macroscopic superpositions exist, there must be an algorithm that can solve this NP-hard problem quickly and efficiently. And because all NP-hard problems are mathematically equivalent, this algorithm must also be capable of solving all other NP-hard problems too, such as the travelling salesman problem. In other words, NP-hard problems are equivalent to the class of much easier problems called P. Or P=NP. But here's the thing: computational complexity theorists have good reason to think that P is not equal to NP (although they haven't yet proven it). If they're right, then macroscopic superpositions cannot exist, which explains why we do not (and cannot) observe them in the real world. Voila!"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

Futureful, The Janus Friis-Backed AI Predictive Discovery Engine, Rebrands As Random

TechCrunch - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 12:06
Futureful, the AI predictive discovery engine backed by Skype co-founder Janus Friis which we last covered back in August, has a new name and a new interface -- evolving its proposition of serendipitous browsing to more clearly flag up the randomness angle. Read More
Categories: IT News

Eyeview Brings Its Personalized Video Ads To Internet-Connected TVs

TechCrunch - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 12:00
Personalized video advertising company Eyeview is announcing that its ads will now work on Internet-connected TVs, specifically those with Roku and Microsoft Xbox devices. Eyeview's technology allows ads to be customized using viewer data. For example, it allows a big chain to create a national ad that will include local stores and deals depending on where it's shown. Read More
Categories: IT News

Linus Torvalds Suspends Key Linux Developer

Slashdot - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 11:35
alphadogg writes: "An argument between developers of some of the most basic parts of Linux turned heated this week, resulting in a prominent Red Hat employee and code contributor being banned from working on the Linux kernel. Kay Sievers, a well-known open-source software engineer, is a key developer of systemd, a system management framework for Linux-based operating systems. Systemd is currently used by several prominent Linux distributions, including two of the most prominent enterprise distros, Red Hat and SUSE. It was recently announced that Ubuntu would adopt systemd in future versions as well. Sievers was banned by kernel maintainer Linus Torvalds on Wednesday for failing to address an issue that caused systemd to interact with the Linux kernel in negative ways."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

Feds Aim to Regulate Healthcare IT While Doing No Harm to Innovation

Network World - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 11:01
A joint report from the Office of the National Coordinator of Health IT, the Food and Drug Administration and the Federal Communications Commission provides guidance on how the government intends to regulate clinical healthcare applications without stifling innovation.
Categories: IT News

The Right Way To Ask Users For iOS Permissions

TechCrunch - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 11:00
Cluster is the first native mobile app I’ve designed, and the experience has taught me a lot about things to consider that aren’t necessarily a concern on the web. When creating a web app, you’re just building a page a user visits. But when creating a native experience, you’re not only asking them to download something but also probably asking them to give you access to their location or… Read More
Categories: IT News

Nokia app developers get some new imaging tricks

Network World - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 10:53
Nokia is giving developers the tools to write Windows Phone apps that lets users do more with their photos, like combine shots taken with the front and back cameras.
Categories: IT News

Secret App Down For Hours, Silicon Valley Goes Back To Work

TechCrunch - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 10:53
Secret, the anonymous gossip-sharing app and current Silicon Valley addiction, is currently experiencing a significant outage following yesterday’s update, which introduced a variety of new features, including anonymous invites – a mechanism the company hoped would help grow its userbase, and subsequently, the amount of content shared on the service. (Uh-oh, maybe that new trick… Read More
Categories: IT News

Algorithm Challenge: Burning Man Vehicle Exodus

Slashdot - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 10:53
Slashdot contributor Bennett Haselton writes: "A year ago, getting ready for Burning Man, I read that the cars in the exit line sometimes have to wait in the sun for hours to get out. I came up with an algorithm that I thought would alleviate the problem. Do you think it would work? If not, why not? Or can you think of a better one?" Read on for the rest of Bennett's thoughts.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

Facebooks Declining Organic Reach a 'Real Nightmare' for Marketers

Network World - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 10:33
Facebook can't be faulted for following the same path as other mass media channels that came before it with regards to advertising, but there are many marketers who are still hoping for something different this time around.
Categories: IT News

ePantry Launches An Online Grocery Offering Sustainable Goods, Automatically Shipped To Your Door

TechCrunch - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 10:20
A new online grocery called ePantry, publicly launching today, believes that consumers do care about buying green and sustainable products, but they often choose not to because it’s less convenient. That is, when you run out of dish soap or laundry detergent, for example, you simply head over to your local store and grab whatever’s on the shelf – and it might not be the best… Read More
Categories: IT News

GameSpy Multiplayer Shutting Down, Affecting Hundreds of Games

Slashdot - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 10:12
An anonymous reader writes "For over a decade, GameSpy has provided and hosted multiplayer services for a variety of video games. GameSpy was purchased in 2012, and there were some worrying shutdowns of older servers, which disabled multiplayer capabilities for a number of games. Now, the whole service is going offline on May 31. Some publishers are scrambling to move to other platforms, while others are simply giving up on those games. Nintendo's recent abandonment of Wi-Fi games was a result of their reliance on GameSpy's servers. Bohemia Interactive, developers of the Arma series, said the GameSpy closure will affect matchmaking and CD-key authentication."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

Fifty years on, mainframer remembers 'a fantastic time to be an engineer'

Network World - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 09:51
The make-or-break project kept engineers just out of college working around the clock hunting down bugs. The product had so much buzz that speculators bought up units to resell later for a profit. The company invested so much in development that its future was riding on success.
Categories: IT News

50 years later, a mainframer recalls 'a fantastic time to be an engineer'

Computerworld News - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 09:51
The make-or-break project kept engineers just out of college working around the clock hunting down bugs. The product had so much buzz that speculators bought up units to resell later for a profit. The company invested so much in development that its future was riding on success.
Categories: IT News

Mainframe turns 50: IBM System/360 launch was dawn of enterprise IT

Computerworld News - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 09:47
In many ways, the modern computer era began in the New Englander Motor Hotel in Greenwich, Connecticut.
Categories: IT News

NASA To Catalog and Release Source Code For Over 1,000 Projects

Slashdot - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 09:30
An anonymous reader writes "By the end of next week, NASA will release a master catalog of over 1,000 software projects it has conducted over the years and will provide instructions on how the public can obtain copies of the source code. NASA's goal is to eventually 'host the actual software code in its own online repository, a kind of GitHub for astronauts.' This follows NASA's release of the code running the Apollo 11 Guidance Computer a few years back. Scientists not affiliated with NASA have already adapted some of NASA's software. 'In 2005, marine biologists adapted the Hubble Space Telescope's star-mapping algorithm to track and identify endangered whale sharks. That software has now been adapted to track polar bears in the arctic and sunfish in the Galapagos Islands.' The Hubble Space Telescope's scheduling software has reportedly also been used to schedule MRIs at hospitals and as control algorithms for online dating services. The possibilities could be endless."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

NASA To Catalog and Release Source Code For Over 1,000 Projects

Slashdot - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 09:30
An anonymous reader writes "By the end of next week, NASA will release a master catalog of over 1,000 software projects it has conducted over the years and will provide instructions on how the public can obtain copies of the source code. NASA's goal is to eventually 'host the actual software code in its own online repository, a kind of GitHub for astronauts.' This follows NASA's release of the code running the Apollo 11 Guidance Computer a few years back. Scientists not affiliated with NASA have already adapted some of NASA's software. 'In 2005, marine biologists adapted the Hubble Space Telescope's star-mapping algorithm to track and identify endangered whale sharks. That software has now been adapted to track polar bears in the arctic and sunfish in the Galapagos Islands.' The Hubble Space Telescope's scheduling software has reportedly also been used to schedule MRIs at hospitals and as control algorithms for online dating services. The possibilities could be endless."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

NASA To Catalog and Release Source Code For Over 1,000 Projects

Slashdot - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 09:30
An anonymous reader writes "By the end of next week, NASA will release a master catalog of over 1,000 software projects it has conducted over the years and will provide instructions on how the public can obtain copies of the source code. NASA's goal is to eventually 'host the actual software code in its own online repository, a kind of GitHub for astronauts.' This follows NASA's release of the code running the Apollo 11 Guidance Computer a few years back. Scientists not affiliated with NASA have already adapted some of NASA's software. 'In 2005, marine biologists adapted the Hubble Space Telescope's star-mapping algorithm to track and identify endangered whale sharks. That software has now been adapted to track polar bears in the arctic and sunfish in the Galapagos Islands.' The Hubble Space Telescope's scheduling software has reportedly also been used to schedule MRIs at hospitals and as control algorithms for online dating services. The possibilities could be endless."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News
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