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In-Flight Wi-Fi Provider Going Above and Beyond To Help Feds Spy

Slashdot - Wed, 04/09/2014 - 17:35
An anonymous reader sends in a report from Wired that GoGo, a company the provides in-flight Wi-Fi access to airline passengers, seems to be making every effort to assist law enforcement agencies with wiretaps. From the article: "Gogo and others that provide Wi-Fi aboard aircraft must follow the same wiretap provisions that require telecoms and terrestrial ISPs to assist U.S. law enforcement and the NSA in tracking users when so ordered. But they may be doing more than the law requires. According to a letter (PDF) Gogo submitted to the Federal Communications Commission, the company voluntarily exceeded the requirements of the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act, or CALEA, by adding capabilities to its service at the request of law enforcement. The revelation alarms civil liberties groups, which say companies should not be cutting deals with the government that may enhance the ability to monitor or track users."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

In-Flight Wi-Fi Provider Going Above and Beyond To Help Feds Spy

Slashdot - Wed, 04/09/2014 - 17:35
An anonymous reader sends in a report from Wired that GoGo, a company the provides in-flight Wi-Fi access to airline passengers, seems to be making every effort to assist law enforcement agencies with wiretaps. From the article: "Gogo and others that provide Wi-Fi aboard aircraft must follow the same wiretap provisions that require telecoms and terrestrial ISPs to assist U.S. law enforcement and the NSA in tracking users when so ordered. But they may be doing more than the law requires. According to a letter (PDF) Gogo submitted to the Federal Communications Commission, the company voluntarily exceeded the requirements of the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act, or CALEA, by adding capabilities to its service at the request of law enforcement. The revelation alarms civil liberties groups, which say companies should not be cutting deals with the government that may enhance the ability to monitor or track users."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

Hands-On Video Of Carousel, Dropbox’s Replacement For Your Camera Roll

TechCrunch - Wed, 04/09/2014 - 17:33
 We take more photos than we know what to do with, and that crummy camera roll that came with your phone can’t handle them. That’s why Dropbox built Carousel for iOS and Android — to make managing your photos simple, just like it did with file storage. Lightning quick with automatic backup and an innovative chat feature, Carousel puts a lifetime of photos at your finger tips.… Read More
Categories: IT News

Dropbox Makes Another Nod Toward Business, But It Might Not Be Enough Yet

TechCrunch - Wed, 04/09/2014 - 17:24
 Dropbox announced several updates to its Dropbox for Business product today that are designed to make it more attractive to IT pros who will administer the service in the enterprise. That said, not all are convinced that the company has gone far enough perfect its offering to larger businesses. R Ray Wang, founder at Constellation Research says today’s announcements are a good first step,… Read More
Categories: IT News

One Kings Lane Loses CEO Doug Mack To Fanatics

TechCrunch - Wed, 04/09/2014 - 17:24
 One Kings Lane CEO Doug Mack is leaving the home goods e-commerce company. Mack will be joining sports site Fanatics as CEO. Mack joined OKL in 2010, and helped grow the company to its nearly $1 billion valuation. As of 2012, he says, One Kings Lane had around $200 million in sales, which has increased, we're told. CFO Dinesh Lathi will be stepping into Mack's role, according to the company. Read More
Categories: IT News

Jabra Solemate Max Review: The Sneaker Speaker Balloons To Basketball Player Proportions

TechCrunch - Wed, 04/09/2014 - 17:22
 Jabra, like Jawbone, used to make Bluetooth headsets back when those were all the rage. Their popularity never extended beyond the ranks of particularly annoying real estate agents and I guess “rainmakers” in various fields, however, and so Jawbone, and later Jabra, turned their Bluetooth expertise to another task: making speakers. Jabra’s Solemate line now has an entry in the… Read More
Categories: IT News

Yahoo DMARC Implementation Breaks Most Mailing Lists

Slashdot - Wed, 04/09/2014 - 16:53
pdclarry writes: "On April 8, Yahoo implemented a new DMARC policy that essentially bars any Yahoo user from accessing mailing lists hosted anywhere except on Yahoo and Google. While Yahoo is the initiator, it also affects Comcast, AT&T, Rogers, SBCGlobal, and several other ISPs. Internet Engineering Council expert John R. Levine, a specialist in email infrastructure and spam filtering, said, 'Yahoo breaks every mailing list in the world including the IETF's' on the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) list. DMARC (Domain-based Message Authentication, Reporting & Conformance) is a two-year-old proposed standard previously discussed on Slashdot that is intended to curb email abuse, including spoofing and phishing. Unfortunately, as implemented by Yahoo, it claims most mailing list users as collateral damage. Messages posted to mailing lists (including listserv, mailman, majordomo, etc) by Yahoo subscribers are blocked when the list forwards them to other Yahoo (and other participating ISPs) subscribers. List members not using Yahoo or its partners are not affected and will receive posts from Yahoo users. Posts from non-Yahoo users are delivered to Yahoo members. So essentially those suffering the most are Yahoo's (and Comcast's, and AT&T's, etc) own customers. The Hacker News has details about why DMARC has this effect on mailing lists. Their best proposed solution is to ban Yahoo email users from mailing lists and encourage them to switch to other ISPs. Unfortunately, it isn't just Yahoo, although they are getting the most attention."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

Spoonrocket Raises $10 Million From Foundation Capital And General Catalyst

TechCrunch - Wed, 04/09/2014 - 16:43
 Spoonrocket, which promises to deliver $8 meals to customers’ doors in 15 minutes or less, has captured the attention of customers in San Francisco and the East Bay. And that has attracted investors like Foundation Capital and General Catalyst, which sources say have together invested at least $10 million in the startup. Read More
Categories: IT News

Dropbox diversifies beyond storage with photos, collaboration apps

Computerworld News - Wed, 04/09/2014 - 16:42
Dropbox, the cloud storage and file sharing vendor, is expanding its scope into photo management and document collaboration.
Categories: IT News

Land Rover reveals 'transparent' hood

Computerworld News - Wed, 04/09/2014 - 16:30
In what is definitely the stuff of science fiction, Land Rover has created a virtual transparent hood that allows drivers to see the ground directly in front of them.
Categories: IT News

Tip of the Hat: What the Heartbleed bug means for you

Computerworld News - Wed, 04/09/2014 - 16:25
Computerworld offers a Tip of the Hat to Shane Dingman of the Toronto Globe and Mail for an easy-to-understand look at the Heartbleed security bug -- what happened, what key websites are among the hundreds of thousands affected, and whether users can do anything at this point.
Categories: IT News

How Riot's Social Scientists Fight League of Legends</em> Trolling

Slashdot - Wed, 04/09/2014 - 16:10
An anonymous reader writes "There's an interesting interview up today with Jeffrey Lin, lead designer of social systems for Riot, the game studio behind League of Legends. Lin has a PhD in cognitive neuroscience. His recognition that most trolls are only trolls because they're having an off day has changed the way that Riot punishes players. 'In other words, you need a carrot and not a stick. Where a punishment would come across as harsh and out-of context, pointing out to players that they're letting their usually-high standards of conduct slide usually results in a change of attitude. Incentivising the good behaviour with an Honour stat which could be affected by conduct in any match also serves to reinforce that good behaviour.' As a result, Lin's seen a noticeable spike in the number of people saying 'GG' (good game) at the end of a match. It leaves you wondering: what if Activision approached Call of Duty griefers on Xbox Live the same way?"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

How Riot's Social Scientists Fight League of Legends</em> Trolling

Slashdot - Wed, 04/09/2014 - 16:10
An anonymous reader writes "There's an interesting interview up today with Jeffrey Lin, lead designer of social systems for Riot, the game studio behind League of Legends. Lin has a PhD in cognitive neuroscience. His recognition that most trolls are only trolls because they're having an off day has changed the way that Riot punishes players. 'In other words, you need a carrot and not a stick. Where a punishment would come across as harsh and out-of context, pointing out to players that they're letting their usually-high standards of conduct slide usually results in a change of attitude. Incentivising the good behaviour with an Honour stat which could be affected by conduct in any match also serves to reinforce that good behaviour.' As a result, Lin's seen a noticeable spike in the number of people saying 'GG' (good game) at the end of a match. It leaves you wondering: what if Activision approached Call of Duty griefers on Xbox Live the same way?"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

How Riot's Social Scientists Fight League of Legends</em> Trolling

Slashdot - Wed, 04/09/2014 - 16:10
An anonymous reader writes "There's an interesting interview up today with Jeffrey Lin, lead designer of social systems for Riot, the game studio behind League of Legends. Lin has a PhD in cognitive neuroscience. His recognition that most trolls are only trolls because they're having an off day has changed the way that Riot punishes players. 'In other words, you need a carrot and not a stick. Where a punishment would come across as harsh and out-of context, pointing out to players that they're letting their usually-high standards of conduct slide usually results in a change of attitude. Incentivising the good behaviour with an Honour stat which could be affected by conduct in any match also serves to reinforce that good behaviour.' As a result, Lin's seen a noticeable spike in the number of people saying 'GG' (good game) at the end of a match. It leaves you wondering: what if Activision approached Call of Duty griefers on Xbox Live the same way?"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

How Riot's Social Scientists Fight League of Legends</em> Trolling

Slashdot - Wed, 04/09/2014 - 16:10
An anonymous reader writes "There's an interesting interview up today with Jeffrey Lin, lead designer of social systems for Riot, the game studio behind League of Legends. Lin has a PhD in cognitive neuroscience. His recognition that most trolls are only trolls because they're having an off day has changed the way that Riot punishes players. 'In other words, you need a carrot and not a stick. Where a punishment would come across as harsh and out-of context, pointing out to players that they're letting their usually-high standards of conduct slide usually results in a change of attitude. Incentivising the good behaviour with an Honour stat which could be affected by conduct in any match also serves to reinforce that good behaviour.' As a result, Lin's seen a noticeable spike in the number of people saying 'GG' (good game) at the end of a match. It leaves you wondering: what if Activision approached Call of Duty griefers on Xbox Live the same way?"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

How Riot's Social Scientists Fight League of Legends</em> Trolling

Slashdot - Wed, 04/09/2014 - 16:10
An anonymous reader writes "There's an interesting interview up today with Jeffrey Lin, lead designer of social systems for Riot, the game studio behind League of Legends. Lin has a PhD in cognitive neuroscience. His recognition that most trolls are only trolls because they're having an off day has changed the way that Riot punishes players. 'In other words, you need a carrot and not a stick. Where a punishment would come across as harsh and out-of context, pointing out to players that they're letting their usually-high standards of conduct slide usually results in a change of attitude. Incentivising the good behaviour with an Honour stat which could be affected by conduct in any match also serves to reinforce that good behaviour.' As a result, Lin's seen a noticeable spike in the number of people saying 'GG' (good game) at the end of a match. It leaves you wondering: what if Activision approached Call of Duty griefers on Xbox Live the same way?"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

How Riot's Social Scientists Fight League of Legends</em> Trolling

Slashdot - Wed, 04/09/2014 - 16:10
An anonymous reader writes "There's an interesting interview up today with Jeffrey Lin, lead designer of social systems for Riot, the game studio behind League of Legends. Lin has a PhD in cognitive neuroscience. His recognition that most trolls are only trolls because they're having an off day has changed the way that Riot punishes players. 'In other words, you need a carrot and not a stick. Where a punishment would come across as harsh and out-of context, pointing out to players that they're letting their usually-high standards of conduct slide usually results in a change of attitude. Incentivising the good behaviour with an Honour stat which could be affected by conduct in any match also serves to reinforce that good behaviour.' As a result, Lin's seen a noticeable spike in the number of people saying 'GG' (good game) at the end of a match. It leaves you wondering: what if Activision approached Call of Duty griefers on Xbox Live the same way?"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

How Riot's Social Scientists Fight League of Legends</em> Trolling

Slashdot - Wed, 04/09/2014 - 16:10
An anonymous reader writes "There's an interesting interview up today with Jeffrey Lin, lead designer of social systems for Riot, the game studio behind League of Legends. Lin has a PhD in cognitive neuroscience. His recognition that most trolls are only trolls because they're having an off day has changed the way that Riot punishes players. 'In other words, you need a carrot and not a stick. Where a punishment would come across as harsh and out-of context, pointing out to players that they're letting their usually-high standards of conduct slide usually results in a change of attitude. Incentivising the good behaviour with an Honour stat which could be affected by conduct in any match also serves to reinforce that good behaviour.' As a result, Lin's seen a noticeable spike in the number of people saying 'GG' (good game) at the end of a match. It leaves you wondering: what if Activision approached Call of Duty griefers on Xbox Live the same way?"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

How Riot's Social Scientists Fight League of Legends</em> Trolling

Slashdot - Wed, 04/09/2014 - 16:10
An anonymous reader writes "There's an interesting interview up today with Jeffrey Lin, lead designer of social systems for Riot, the game studio behind League of Legends. Lin has a PhD in cognitive neuroscience. His recognition that most trolls are only trolls because they're having an off day has changed the way that Riot punishes players. 'In other words, you need a carrot and not a stick. Where a punishment would come across as harsh and out-of context, pointing out to players that they're letting their usually-high standards of conduct slide usually results in a change of attitude. Incentivising the good behaviour with an Honour stat which could be affected by conduct in any match also serves to reinforce that good behaviour.' As a result, Lin's seen a noticeable spike in the number of people saying 'GG' (good game) at the end of a match. It leaves you wondering: what if Activision approached Call of Duty griefers on Xbox Live the same way?"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News

How Riot's Social Scientists Fight League of Legends</em> Trolling

Slashdot - Wed, 04/09/2014 - 16:10
An anonymous reader writes "There's an interesting interview up today with Jeffrey Lin, lead designer of social systems for Riot, the game studio behind League of Legends. Lin has a PhD in cognitive neuroscience. His recognition that most trolls are only trolls because they're having an off day has changed the way that Riot punishes players. 'In other words, you need a carrot and not a stick. Where a punishment would come across as harsh and out-of context, pointing out to players that they're letting their usually-high standards of conduct slide usually results in a change of attitude. Incentivising the good behaviour with an Honour stat which could be affected by conduct in any match also serves to reinforce that good behaviour.' As a result, Lin's seen a noticeable spike in the number of people saying 'GG' (good game) at the end of a match. It leaves you wondering: what if Activision approached Call of Duty griefers on Xbox Live the same way?"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: IT News
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