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Barack and Michelle Obama Remember Frankie Knuckles

RollingStone - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 17:50
President Barack Obama and Michelle Obama have shared a letter offering their thoughts and prayers to the friends and family of Chicago house pioneer Frankie Knuckles who died earlier this month FACT reports Check Out these 5 Defining Tracks from Frankie Knuckles "Frankie's work helped open minds and bring people together blending...

Categories: Magazines

Gwyneth Paltrow’s Goop Lost Money in 2012 and 2011

Time - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 17:42

Gwyneth Paltrow’s lifestyle company Goop, famous for its weekly newsletter, was in debt and losing money through the end of 2012, the company’s corporate records reveal.

Unaudited financial statements for the privately-held company that were filed with the UK’s Companies House state that Goop reported a 2012 loss of around $39,000 (£22,954), Radar Online reports. That was a big improvement from 2011, however, when the company reported nearly $260,200 (£155,834) in losses.

The company had real revenue — the records show significant product sales and income from Groupon — but expenses exceeded gross profits. Compensation for Paltrow and recently departed Goop CEO Sebastian Bishop was one of the more notable administrative expenses. The two took in close to $589,000 (£350,000) together in 2012, nearly a third of the company’s gross profits that year and a significant increase from the almost $173,000 (£102,788) they received the previous year.

Categories: Magazines

Country Hall of Fame Taps Ronnie Milsap, Mac Wiseman, Hank Cochran

RollingStone - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 17:35
Ronnie Milsap Mac Wiseman and the late Hank Cochran will receive country music's highest honor later this year induction into the Country Music Hall of Fame The 2014 honorees were announced Tuesday at a press conference inside the downtown Nashville landmark's rotunda which houses the bronze plaques of its 121...

Categories: Magazines

How the Heck Do You Make Powdered Alcohol?

Time - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 17:34

The Internet was in a tizzy yesterday over what appeared to be the approval of powdered alcohol, which had the potential to be added to water or food, or snorted.

But if it sounds too ridiculous to be true, it probably is—for now. The labels for the powdered alcohol, branded “Palcohol,” were approved in error, and the product’s label approval was rescinded yesterday by the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB). The company that makes Palcohol, Lipsmark, had this to say on its site: “We have been in touch with the TTB and there seemed to be a discrepancy on…how much powder is in the bag. There was a mutual agreement for us to surrender the labels. This doesn’t mean that Palcohol isn’t approved. It just means that these labels aren’t approved. We will re-submit.”

So while it appears powdered alcohol’s move to market has been stalled, we’re still scratching our heads: Considering how quickly liquid alcohol evaporates, do you make it powdered?

Palcohol, it turns out, is not the first attempt at a powdered alcohol. According to patent data, General Foods Corporation (now a subsidiary of Kraft) patented a couple of ways to make “alcohol-containing powder” in the early 1970s. In their process, they took a carbohydrate and broke it down through a process called hydrolysis, rendering it into a white powder. According to John Coupland, a professor of food science at Penn State University and spokesperson for the Institute of Food Technologists, they then combined that powder with pure liquid alcohol, which stuck to the powder, essentially capturing the alcohol in white dust. “It would feel dry to your hands,” Coupland says.

The Palcohol makers are not revealing how they make their product, which comes in cosmopolitan, mojito, margarita, and lemon drop flavors. “They say that they are trying to patent it at the moment, which suggests they have something novel, but I have no clue what that could be,” says Coupland.

So it looks like powdered alcohol is indeed possible, but won’t be for sale anytime soon. For now, you’re still going to have to consume your alcohol with dinner—instead of sprinkled on top of it.

 

Categories: Magazines

Courtney Love Knows 'You Know My Name' on New Song

RollingStone - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 17:10
Courtney Love won't release her double A-side single "You Know My Name"/"Wedding Day" until May 4th but the vicious chugging "You Know My Name" has already premiered on Steve Lamacq's BBC Radio 6 show You can check out the track above which finds Love in full beast mode wracking up...

Categories: Magazines

Watch Young the Giant Perform Live at The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas

RollingStone - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 17:10
For their latest album Mind Over Matter Young the Giant told us they were demonstrating "democracy at work" "Sometimes you can think about higher things and the social implications of what you're doing but at the end of the day just being and existing as a group together getting in...

Categories: Magazines

TIME 100 Alumni Who Continue to Inspire Change

Time - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 17:07

Over the past 10 years, TIME has chosen some of the world’s biggest movers and shakers for its annual list of the most influential people in the world. Many of them have continued to transform themselves and the lives of others long after their inclusion.

Take Hillary Clinton, for example. The one-time First Lady has appeared on the list seven times (including one time with husband Bill) as she evolved from senator to presidential candidate to Secretary of State to (unofficial) presidential candidate again. We’ve selected 10 other honorees that we think fit the bill.

Categories: Magazines

Hear Courtney Love Howl on “You Know My Name”: Listen

Time - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 17:03

Hole’s grunge classic Live Through This turned 20 years old last week, which prompted an outpouring of nostalgia for Courtney Love’s glory days — as well as a lot of bummed-out head-shaking at her spottier output in recent years: Hole’s poorly reviewed Nobody’s Daughter, Love’s poor-selling 2004 solo album, America’s Sweetheart.

But in advance of an upcoming tour, Love is releasing an double A-side on May 4, and the first song from it should serve as proof that Love’s still got it. “You Know My Name” is a thrilling punk workout that has Love screaming and spewing venom like the alt-rock banshee she once was. Just when the track seems to reach its peak, it ignites with a forceful hook: “All this world is burning up / It’s time that you retire.” Good thing she hasn’t.

Categories: Magazines

Apple’s Patent to Auto-Disable Texting While Driving Is Old News

Time - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 16:59

The idea that a master control device placed in your car or truck or rental vehicle might automatically deactivate your smartphone’s ability to text has been around for awhile: There’s an app that’ll disable phone texting if it detects motion above 10 m.p.h., for instance, or another from AT&T that’ll do so the same once you reach 25 m.p.h. We’ve written about a few ourselves in recent years, like Scosche CellControl, or TextBuster. They’re not really news.

Bear that in mind as you’re reading reports that Apple might (gasp!) have lockout designs on your handheld computing device while operating a motor vehicle. First, the news stems from a patent, and patents slot somewhere between hypotheticals and parking spaces. And second, Apple filed this particular patent back in 2008 — this is just the patent coming to light.

Here’s the gist, scraped from U.S. patent 8,706,143, published today for what Apple describes as a “Driver handheld computing device lock-out.”

…The lock-out mechanisms disable the ability of a handheld computing device to perform certain functions, such as texting, while one is driving. In one embodiment, a handheld computing device can provide a lock-out mechanism without requiring any modifications or additions to a vehicle by using a motion analyzer, a scenery analyzer and a lock-out mechanism. In other embodiments, the handheld computing device can provide a lock-out mechanism with modifications or additions to the vehicle, including the use of signals transmitted by the vehicle or by the vehicle key when engaged with the vehicle.

In other words, pretty much like the apps mentioned above. Apple’s imprimatur could carry significantly more water, of course, if it’s working with automotive manufacturers to make the technology work automatically (or optionally) with its iOS device lineup. And while anti-texting app-makers like Cinqpoint have talked about offering iOS versions down the line, your alternatives in iOS at this point are limited to workarounds that don’t actually disable texting, because Apple doesn’t allow it. Whether that’s because Apple’s been waiting to roll out its own solution, or for security reasons, say to prevent rogue apps hijacking your phone’s messaging capabilities, is anyone’s guess.

In the meantime, the real debate governing hard and fast anti-texting solutions is over here; that’s where the conversation has to start, anyway.

Categories: Magazines

U.S. Plans Military Exercises Near Russia

Time - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 16:54
MoreUkraine Leader Orders Forces To Resume Operations in Restive East

The United States will send hundreds of troops to eastern Europe for training exercises, the Pentagon said Tuesday, as the Americans look to reassure nervous allies that border Russia.

The U.S. will deploy roughly 600 troops already stationed in Europe to Poland, Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia, Rear Adm. John Kirby, the Pentagon press secretary, said Tuesday. The troops will be replaced with new units within about a month, and the U.S. expects to maintain a presence for at least the remainder of the year, he said.

“The message is to the people of Poland and Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia that the United States takes seriously our obligations,” Kirby said.

The U.S. is aiming to reassure allies in the region amid tensions on Ukraine’s eastern border, where Russia has amassed thousands of troops since it annexed the southern Ukrainian region of Crimea.

Vice President Joe Biden met with the Ukrainian leadership in Kiev on Tuesday, where he threatened new sanctions against Russia if it does not pull back its troops. He also said Russia should “stop talking and start acting,” days after international parties agreed on a joint roadmap to diffuse the crisis in eastern Ukraine, where pro-Russian separatists have occupied towns and cities. The separatists have so far defied the agreement’s stipulation that they disarm, and on Tuesday acting Ukrainian president Oleksander Turchinov called for police to resume “counterterrorism” operations in the region after the body of a recently abducted local politician with suspected torture marks was found.

Categories: Magazines

Fan TV Highlights Everything Wrong with Cable Right Now

Time - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 16:36

Fan TV has a simple proposition for Time Warner Cable customers: For $99, it will make your cable TV-watching experience better.

You buy the box and stick it in your living room, in place of a regular cable box. Instead of the the regular guide–cluttered with row upon row of channels you never watch–you get personalized recommendations, not just for stuff that’s on cable, but for shows and movies from other streaming video sources like Crackle and Redbox Instant. And instead of a huge, clunky remote, you use a touchscreen pad that responds to swipes and taps.

But as CNet points out, Fan TV also makes the experience worse in a few significant ways: You can only watch what’s available through Time Warner Cable’s mobile app, which means some channels may not be available. You also can’t record live shows for later viewing or watch recordings from another DVR. A full cable box stand-in this is not.

No disrespect to Fan TV, which has created what appears to be a pleasant interface and concept. But the whole setup is preposterous.

Here we have a cable company that is unwilling to reinvent its stodgy old system for watching television, but continues to increase prices year after year. To justify these higher prices, Time Warner Cable and other providers point out how they’re offering more channels than ever, regardless of whether subscribers asked for these channels. Meanwhile, the licensing costs to carry all these channels keep going up, and all subscribers get is more clutter in an increasingly mind-numbing TV guide interface.

So now, instead of addressing those problems, Time Warner Cable turns to another company that promises to fix the clutter–not for the same exorbitant prices you’ve been paying, mind you, but for an extra $99. Oh, but no DVR allowed. Sorry.

No wonder more people are ditching or skipping cable in favor of cheaper, smarter, more convenient online video services. And no wonder companies like Google and Apple have delayed or given up on plans to make cable TV better. It’s a lost cause.

On a section of Fan TV’s website, the company wonders aloud whether it’s crazy to compete with the tech giants and instead cozy up to pay TV providers like Time Warner Cable. At last, we know the answer.

Categories: Magazines

Electric Zoo Returns with Increased Security, Health Measures

RollingStone - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 16:30
EDM festival Electric Zoo will return to New York City's Randall's Island this summer with increased security and health measures following the drug-related deaths of two attendees last year The 50 Most Important People in EDM A press release outlined the new security measures which include drug-sniffing dogs stationed at all entrances...

Categories: Magazines

Why The U.S. Middle Class Is No Longer the World’s Richest and Other Fascinating News on the Web

Time - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 16:29

1. Stuck in the Middle MoreThe Americans Who Question The Big Bang Theory and Other Fascinating News on the WebFrench IT Employees Win Right to Unplug after Work and Other Fascinating News on the WebMen Charged With Toppling Ancient Rock Formation Avoid Jail Time Huffington PostHere's An Updated Tally Of All The People Who Have Ever Died From A Marijuana Overdose Huffington PostAll the Delicious Details from Beyoncé and Jay Z's Easter Brunch People

America is still the world’s richest large country. But that’s only when you average out the earnings across all income levels. For the first time in decades, the American middle class is no longer the world’s richest (blame Canada). Here’s Harvards’s Lawrence Katz: “In 1960, we were massively richer than anyone else. In 1980, we were richer. In the 1990s, we were still richer. That is no longer the case.”

Popular Among Subscribers Barbara Brown Taylor Faces the Darkness Shinzo Abe: The PatriotThe Blindness of Bigotry

+ Your money or your life? It turns out the two are deeply connected. The richer you are, the older you’ll get.

+ MoJo: 10 poverty myths, busted.

+ If you want a good, longterm investment, then why are you buying a house? (Because it’s almost impossible to host a brunch in a mutual fund?)

2. Affirmative Abstraction

The Supreme Court upheld Michigan’s ban on the use of race-conscious admissions at public universities. Writing for the 6-2 majority, Justice Kennedy wrote: “This case is not about how the debate about racial preferences should be resolved. It is about who may resolve it.” Justice Sotomayor read her dissent from the bench: “For members of historically marginalized groups, which rely on the federal courts to protect their constitutional rights, the decision can hardly bolster hope for a vision of democracy that preserves for all the right to participate meaningfully and equally in self-government.”

+ Today, the Supreme Court will hear the case against Aereo, one that could change the way we watch TV.

+ Should a product called Pomegranate Blueberry Flavored Blend of Five Juices contain more than a couple drops of blueberry and pomegranate juice? The court seems to think so.

3. Space Case

It turns out that Earth Day could focus our attention too narrowly. We are also littering in space. From FP: 135 million pieces of junk are orbiting Earth at 18,000 mph. “At that speed, even a half-inch piece of debris would have the kinetic force of a bowling ball thrown 300 miles per hour.”

4. Playing Through It

“It was strange because it was so routine. We hit, I got off the block, no big deal. I felt something flash — like they say when you get your bell rung. I didn’t lose consciousness. I walked back to the huddle and finished the drive.” That’s NFL linebacker Russell Allen. Was it a concussion? Nope. Russell Allen played through a stroke.

+ Salon: The brain injury that made me a math genius.

5. Breaking Worse

In a plot line that might sound somewhat familiar, Dicky Joe Jackson needed money to pay for his son’s life-saving surgery. So he sold meth. That was in 1996. Jackson got busted. And sentenced to life without parole.

6. The Guile High Club

“Authorities said the temperature in the wheel well at the jet’s cruising altitude of 38,000 feet could have dropped to 50 degrees below zero or lower. Oxygen also would have been in painfully short supply at that altitude, about 9,000 feet higher than the summit of Mt. Everest.” So how did a teen stowaway survive in a jetliner wheel well for five and a half hours and appear almost completely unscathed? (I can barely survive economy plus.)

+ And the other key question: With all the airport security we have these days, how did the kid get to the plane in the first place?

7. Peak Mountain

“There is no denying that climbing Everest is a preposterously dangerous undertaking for the members who provide the Sherpas’ income. But running counter to the disturbing trend among Sherpas, climbing Everest has actually grown significantly safer for Western guides and members in recent years.” Jon Krakauer on Death and Anger on Everest.

8. People Change

People don’t change. That’s what they told us. But according to a few studies, people actually can and do change as they get older. “From the ages of 20 to 65, people report increases in positive traits, such as conscientiousness, and decreases in negative traits, such as neuroticism.” (My wife submitted this link.)

+ Does the moon influence human behavior?

+ Is it time for us to take astrology seriously? (That really depends on your sign…)

9. On a Fling and a Prayer

If you are looking for a love that will last, I’d suggest hooking up with an albatross. If you’re into something a little more casual, there’s a 99% chance that Flamingos will just not be that into you. From NPR: Introducing A Divorce Rate For Birds.

10. The Bottom of the News

These days it seems like every investor is sharing tips and branding themselves as experts. So after more than a decade of investing in, and working with, startups, I’ve decided to finally share My Secret Investment Strategy.

+ Naugahyde the Salami: The conviction has been upheld in the case of the guy who committed a sex act on a BART seat. (It would have been completely legal had he been taking a selfie.)

+ Does anyone know more about Katy Perry than Katy Perry? Yup.

+ Game of Thrones: An Honest (and incredible) trailer.

+ Want to sleep in? Here’s where you should live.

Categories: Magazines

It’s Not You, It’s Science: How Perfectionism Holds Women Back

Time - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 16:16

There are certain things one might assume you’re supposed to have mastered as a columnist. One is how to start a column. But if you’re me, you can spend hours writing and rewriting and deleting and restructuring a piece before coming to the conclusion that you have no business having a column at all. Crumpled over your sad desk in your living room, in your freelance uniform (pajamas), you are pretty sure your new writing contract will be revoked by the end of the week.

MoreHere’s Meryl Streep’s Spot-On Advice About Being a WomanBeing Creative Outside of Work Makes You Better at Your JobMen Charged With Toppling Ancient Rock Formation Avoid Jail Time Huffington PostHere's An Updated Tally Of All The People Who Have Ever Died From A Marijuana Overdose Huffington PostAll the Delicious Details from Beyoncé and Jay Z's Easter Brunch People

Then you realize: you’re doing precisely what it is you’re supposed to be writing about — doubting yourself, over and over again, to the point of crippling paralysis. The perils of feminine self-doubt — and how they impact women’s professional aspirations — are the subject of a new book, The Confidence Code, by journalists (and recovering self-doubters) Katty Kay and Claire Shipman.

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Through dozens of interviews, scientific research and even experiments in genetic testing, The Confidence Code takes on the science and art of self-assurance, as well as the fact that women (like me) tend to struggle with it disproportionately. Why it matters? Well, by now most of us have heard the stories about how women are climbing the corporate ranks, dominating the workforce and graduating in higher numbers than men. “Lean In” has become part of the pop lexicon. But what does any of that matter if women can’t have the confidence to own their accomplishments and strive for their goals? How can women equal the ranks of the professional world, the authors ask, if we don’t even believe we’re supposed to be there?

“I think there’s a mainstream recognition now that organizations are better off with a diverse group of women at the top​ — and a focus on how to get more women in the pipeline and in power,” says Shipman. “But there’s also something inside of us that’s holding us back.”

Longtime friends Kay and Shipman realized over dinner one night that each struggled with the same problem of self-doubt. Kay, a news anchor for the BBC, has covered three presidential elections, the wars in Kosovo, Afghanistan and Iraq, and speaks several languages. And yet she spent her career convinced she wasn’t smart enough to compete for the top jobs. Shipman, a contributor to ABC and Good Morning America, had a habit of telling people she’d gotten “lucky” when she asked how she got into journalism. She began her career as a foreign correspondent at CNN, reporting from Moscow.

But the confidence problem wasn’t just limited to them. In two decades covering American politics, the two journalists had interviewed some of the most powerful women in the nation — lawmakers and CEOs, professional athletes, leaders of social movements. Time and again, they saw the same self-doubt: bright women with ideas afraid to raise their hands, speak up, ask for a raise or a promotion; that inexplicable feeling that they don’t own the right to rule at the top.

“If they are feeling all that,” the authors write, “imagine what it is like for the rest of us.”

What it’s like looks something like this.

When a professional endeavor goes wrong, women are more likely to blame themselves. Yet when something goes right, they credit circumstance – or other people – for their success. (Men do the opposite.)

Women are more likely than men to be perfectionists, holding themselves back from answering a question, applying for a new job, asking for a raise, until they’re absolutely 100 percent sure we can predict the outcome. (Women applied for a promotion only when they met 100 percent of the qualifications. Men applied when they met 50 percent.)

Women are a quarter as likely as men to negotiate a raise. We doubt our opinions and begin our sentences with “I don’t know if this is right, but—.” We are more prone to “rumination” than men – which causes us to overthink and overanalyze. (Sound familiar?)

I was watching Hillary Clinton up on stage recently, at a conference for women. She was asked to give the younger generation career advice. “At this point in my career, I’ve employed so many young people,” Hillary began. “One of the differences is that when I say to a young woman, ‘I want you to take on this extra responsibility,” almost invariably she says, ‘Do you think I’m ready?’ But when I ask a man, he goes, ‘How high, how fast, when do I start?!’”

“Too many young women,” Clinton continued, “are harder on themselves than circumstances warrant. They are too often selling themselves short.”

In other words, they lack confidence. And confidence, as the authors make clear, is as important to professional success as competence.

Now naturally, there are plenty of ways that women can gain confidence. And in fact, it’s not quite so simple as learning those skills. (In many cases, it’s the same qualities that make women good for business — they are more collaborative, for example — that holds them back from touting their accomplishments or taking credit.) We also need to address structural changes that hold women back — as, naturally, there’s only so much leaning in a person can do.

But perhaps the most useful aspect of all of this talk about confidence is recognizing that it’s a problem at all. Knowing that it’s there, that it’s backed by science, that it’s not just you – and then trying to correct for it.

“I think it’s important for women to recognize that it’s totally normal for us to feel nervous, particularly in situations in which we’re so often the only woman in the room,” says Kay. “That realization — for me, anyway — has helped me work to overcome it.”

 

Jessica Bennett is contributing columnist at Time.com covering the intersection of women, business and pop culture. A former Newsweek senior writer, she is also a contributing editor for Sheryl Sandberg’s women’s foundation, Lean In. You can follow her @jess7bennett

Categories: Magazines

'Quadrophenia' Hits the Quad

RollingStone - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 16:10
This year marks not only the 50th anniversary of the Who but also the 50th anniversary of the Brighton Beach battle between mods and rockers immortalized in Quadrophenia To mark the occasion England's University of Sussex is holding a weekend-long symposium on both the album and the film from July...

Categories: Magazines

The Words Most Likely to Find You Online Dating Success

Time - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 16:06

Is your online dating profile failing to attract “the one?” It may be because of the words you’re using, a new analysis from dating site PlentyOfFish reveals.

In the study, a team of PhD scientists analyzed the words used by the 1.2 million profiles on PlentyOfFish. According to the company, very clear trends arose amongst those who were successful in finding love and those who were still looking.

Those who have found love, unsurprisingly, use the word “love” the most in their profiles. Successful daters of both sexes frequently used the words “time,” “life,” “friend” and “music,” as well.

Men are more likely to find love using words in their online dating profile that suggest an interest in a long-term relationship. The words “heart,” “children,” “romantic” and “relationship” are all markers of a man most likely to see success in love. The advice holds true for women, as well: Women who found relationships used the word “relationship” 16% more often than those who are still single.

Those still looking for love tend to use words that describe shorter term activities, like “travel,” “dinner” and “shop” for women and “hang” and “humor” for men.

Want to learn more about saucing up your online dating profile? Check out this more detailed word analysis of successful OKCupid and Match.com profiles. Then be sure to read up on these online dating red flags so you know what – and who – to avoid online.

This article was written by Fox Van Allen and originally appeared on Techlicious.

More from Techlicious:

Categories: Magazines

Heroic Corgi Defends Grass Against Menacing Goats

Time - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 16:06

When a pair of goats clearly attempted to gang up on this poor innocent corgi, well, let’s just say she stood her ground and fought back.

Her name is Mini and she happens to be the same pooch who bravely took on a sour lemon candy a few months back. Look how far she’s come in such a short time! Then, she battled a tiny inanimate object, and now, she’s taking on two whole goats!

Be sure to watch 27 seconds in as the goats awkwardly maneuver their way out of an adirondack chair. Shortly afterwards, it becomes clear that this corgi is a formidable foe, stumpy legs and all.

Categories: Magazines

Americans Flunk Science—Again

Time - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 15:59

Shhh! Listen! Hear that steady thumping? That’s the sound of scientists—particularly climate scientists—across the country pounding their heads against their desks. And at this point, that’s perfectly understandable, given a new poll released by Gallup concerning Americans’ beliefs about climate change.

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The United States breaks down into three camps on the question of whether the Earth is warming and human activities are playing a significant role, according to Gallup: 39% are “concerned believers,” 36% are part of the “mixed middle,” and 25% are “cool skeptics.” And the contrarian camp is growing: The 39% concerned believer figure is the same as it was in 2001; the mixed middle group has tumbled from 49% to 36%; and that 13% difference was completely gobbled up by the naysayers, who went from 12% to 25%.

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Worse, the “cool” part of the cool-skeptics rubric misstates the unanimity and intensity of their beliefs. When the respondents were asked more granular questions—exactly how much they worry about climate change; if they believe that the dangers are understated, overstated or are being fairly described; if they believe climate change poses a threat to their lives—the believers and the mixed group generally had a range of opinions, but the skeptics move in lockstep. Is climate change exaggerated? 100% say yes. Does it pose a serious threat? 100% say no. That’s the stuff of a Crimean referendum.

Look, for the 12 millionth time, nobody pretends that climate science has been completely figured out—there are plenty of holes in the models and unanswered questions. But what’s settled is that the Earth is warming, the climate is becoming dangerously volatile and human activity is a meaningful part of the cause. The mere fact that the deniers are flat wrong on this score doesn’t mean that the concerned believers are entirely correct. Fully 58% of them believe that the dangers of climate change have actually been understated—a hard case to make given some of the apocalyptic visions that come out of the louder factions of the green movement. But they’re a whole lot righter than the faction that wants to put its fingers in its ears, make a cheap and easy Al Gore joke and move on.

That, frankly, is as far as we need to go down the false equivalency road—the obligatory hedge that both sides play the misinformation game. The fact is, it’s conservatives (65% of the cool skeptic group), Republicans (80%) and men (66%) who are on the wrong side of the science, and there’s no mystery as to how we’ve gotten here. Global warming denial has become one of the core beliefs of conservative and Republican ideology, along with a handful of other positions including opposition to gun control legislation and tax increases and a near-fetishistic obsession with overturning the Affordable Care Act. If you want to play in the GOP poker game, those are the table stakes.

Tuesday’s Gallup poll comes just a day after an AP/GfK poll showing even higher rates of global warming skepticism—a dispiriting 40%. Another 51% of respondents question the Big Bang, and 15% doubt the safety and efficacy of vaccines. That last is a deadly figure—literally—because vaccination rates of up 95% are required to create the so-called herd immunity that protects entire communities. It doesn’t take much math to see the harm a 15% opt-out will do.

It ought to be a poor time to have such counterfactual beliefs. Just last month, a landmark study out of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics provided some of the strongest evidence yet for the Big Bang. Just this season, New York City and Columbus, Ohio are suffering from outbreaks of measles and mumps as increasing numbers of parents refuse vaccines for their kids. And just on Tuesday—Earth Day—an iceberg twice as big as Atlanta was calving away from Antarctica, one more dramatic step in the slow thaw of the planet’s ice cover.

There’s a lot of blame to go around for our stubbornly misinformed beliefs. All it takes is a know-nothing with a megaphone like Jenny McCarthy or oil-rich sugar daddies like the Koch brothers to spread nonsense about vaccines or global warming. But it’s facile to point the finger at them entirely. Yes, they’re peddling junk, but too many of us are still buying. Until we stop, they’ll never go away.

Categories: Magazines

Courteney Cox Dashes Hopes for a 'Friends' Reunion

RollingStone - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 15:50
Unfortunately the cast of Friends will not be there for you — Courteney Cox put a blunt end to any dreams of a possible reunion in the near future telling David Letterman on The Late Show Monday night "It's not gonna happen" Check Out Our List of 17 TV Shows that Lasted Way...

Categories: Magazines

What Americans Think About Birth Control Coverage

Time - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 15:35

There’s debate over whether all health plans in the United States be required to cover the cost of birth control. An overwhelming majority of Americans—69%—say yes, according to a breaking survey published in the journal JAMA.

While this suggests the issue is less divisive than previously thought, it’s still a hot-button issue in the courts. In June, the Supreme Court is expected to reach a decision in the Hobby Lobby case, in which the owners of the arts-and-crafts chain, who are Southern Baptists, contend that their right to exercise religious freedom are infringed upon by the Affordable Care Act provision requiring them to guarantee no-cost birth control and emergency contraceptive coverage for their employees.

Although most Americans are in favor of the mandated birth control coverage—77% of women and 64% of men—it was the least agreed upon when compared with other health services under the ACA provision. Mandated coverage of preventive services like mammograms and colonoscopies, vaccinations, mental health care, and dental care all had more support than mandatory contraceptive coverage, according to the JAMA poll. (Birth control coverage has the most support among women, and black and Hispanic respondents.)

The researchers hope their data can be used to inform the ongoing national debate over contraceptive coverage.

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