Environmental Research and Stewardship

We must consider our environment from every angle: science, history, human behavior, the influence of politics and religion, the role of art, and the realities of economics and law.
Study of the environment at Bowdoin encourages broad environmental literacy through course offerings and activities available to all students—building a solid foundation for the career paths that Bowdoin graduates pursue in all walks of life.

Roux Center exterior, October of 2018What We Build, and How, and Why

Bowdoin's newest academic building, the Roux Center for the Environment, combines these questions and ideas and puts them directly into practice. The building itself is LEED-platinum certified, and makes use of rooftop gardens, cutting-edge heating and energy solutions, water reuse, and integrated indiginous landscaping.

But as impressive as it stands on its own, the Roux Center exemplifies much more than a building: it combines faculty from across disciplines all over campus to address the pressing issues of the environment in ways that combine the science and the data with ideas about policy, belief systems, cost and profit, aesthetics, culture, and trust.  

A Race to Save the Artifacts

“We have outstanding faculty and students in a variety of disciplines doing important work across a diverse set of problems related to the environment.”

At the Epicenter of Big Ideas

The Gulf of Maine is the fastest-warming body of water in the world. The state of Maine itself is undergoing substantial economic and environmental changes related to fishing, logging, farming, and tourism.

Our location in Brunswick gives us access to diverse ecosystems—tidal areas, marshes, forests, open ocean, beaches, rivers, bays, and inlets—but also access to the people and projects that depend on them. Rural farming, alternative energy solutions, city airports struggling with migrating seabirds—these are all issues found within half an hour of Bowdoin's campus.

VIDEO
10 Days in Iceland: Bowdoin and the Environment

Twenty students and four faculty members from the Department of Earth and Oceanographic Science trekked to Iceland for ten days for field research into the earth, the sea, and the atmosphere — and the connections among them.
"We all have a role to play in preserving our natural habitats."

Meet the Schillers, generous donors to the Coastal Studies Center