Spring 2013 Courses

Theater

106. Introduction to Drama
William Watterson W 8:00 - 9:25, F 8:00 - 9:25 Sills-109
Traces a range of dramatic genres, styles, and modes of production from the festival of Dionysus in ancient Greece through the Renaissance and into the global theater of today. Explores the evolution of plot design, with special attention to the politics of playing, the shifting strategies of representing human agency, and contemporary relationships between the theater and other visual media. Authors include Sophocles, Aristophanes, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Behn, Wilde, Beckett, Mamet, Wilson, and Churchill, with secondary readings by Aristotle, Brecht, Artaud, and Grotowski, among others. Students invited to participate in staged readings during class and part of a final group project that includes staging a portion of one of the plays studied.
120. Acting I
Abigail Killeen M 1:30 - 3:25, W 1:30 - 3:25 Memorial-108
Introduces students to the intellectual, vocal, physical, and emotional challenge of the acting process. Students examine theatrical texts and practice the art of translating intellectual analysis into embodied performance. Fundamentals of text analysis are learned and practiced, preparing students for the more complex performance work required in all sections of Acting II.
120. Acting I
Melissa Thompson M 1:30 - 3:25, W 1:30 - 3:25 Memorial Hall-601 Dance Studio
Introduces students to the intellectual, vocal, physical, and emotional challenge of the acting process. Students examine theatrical texts and practice the art of translating intellectual analysis into embodied performance. Fundamentals of text analysis are learned and practiced, preparing students for the more complex performance work required in all sections of Acting II.
145. Performance and Narrative
Abigail Killeen M 9:30 - 11:25, W 9:30 - 11:25 Memorial-108
For millennia, we have organized our fictions, our religions, our histories, and our own lives as narratives. However much the narrative form has been called into question in recent years, it seems we just cannot stop telling each other stories. Examines the particular nexus between narrative and performance: What is narrative? How does it work? What are its limits and its limitations? How do we communicate narrative in performance? Involves both critical inquiry and the creation of performance pieces based in text, dance, movement, and the visual image.
195. Production and Performance
Melissa Thompson
Engagement in the presentation of a full-length work for public performance with a faculty director or choreographer. Areas of concentration within the production may include design, including set, light, sound, or costume; rehearsal and performance of roles; service as assistant director or stage manager. In addition to fulfilling specific production responsibilities, students meet weekly to synthesize work. Students gain admission to Theater 195 either through audition (performers) or through advance consultation (designers, stage managers, and assistant directors). Students register for Theater 195 during the add/drop period at the beginning of each semester. Students are required to commit a minimum of six hours a week to rehearsal and production responsibilities over a period of seven to twelve weeks; specific time commitments depend upon the role the student is assuming in the production and the production schedule. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit. May be repeated a maximum of four times for credit, earning a maximum of two credits.
218. Smashing the Fourth Wall: Russian Theater Arts in the Twentieth and Twenty-first Centuries
Kristina Toland T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55 CT-16 Harrison McCann
Studies the elements of the 20th and 21st century Russian and Soviet Theater by analyzing the works of canonical writers and important contemporary authors and by considering a range of theatrical ideas and conventions. In order to understand the specific purposes of play-writing as a form of fiction presented in performance, various aspects of theater production will be highlighted in relation to the texts read in class. Significant emphasis will be placed on the study of visual culture as the essential contributing factor in the development of theater arts. We will read plays, watch performances, and examine visual artworks related to stage production. Authors to be read in the course may include: Anton Chekhov, Alexander Block, Vladimir Maykovsky, Nikolai Erdman, Mikhail Bulgakov, Daniil Kharms, Alexandr Vampilov, Liudmila Petryshevskaya, Olga Mukhina, and others. Texts by Vsevolod Meyerhold, Konstantin Stanislavsky, Nikolai Evreinov, and other theater practitioners, theoreticians, and critics will be read as well.
225. Acting II: Physical Theater
Davis Robinson T 9:30 - 11:25, TH 9:30 - 11:25 Memorial Hall-601 Dance Studio
Extends the principles of Acting I through a full semester of rigorous physical acting work focused on presence, energy, relaxation, alignment, and emotional freedom. Develops and brings the entire body to the act of being on stage through highly structured individual exercises and ensemble-oriented improvisational work. Scene work is explored through the movement-based acting disciplines of Lecoq, Grotowski, Meyerhold, or Viewpoints. Contemporary physical theater makers ThÈ‚tre de ComplicitÈ, Mabou Mines, SITI company, and Frantic Assembly are discussed. This course, along with Theater 220, Acting II: Voice and Text, is part of a two-semester course series. Theater 220 and 225 may be taken individually or in any order.
246. Modern Drama and Performance
Marilyn Reizbaum M 6:30 - 9:25 Mass Hall-Faculty Room
Examines dramatic trends of the modern period, beginning with a triumvirate of modern dramatistsóHenrik Ibsen, Bertolt Brecht, and Samuel Beckettóand draws lines from their work in drama of ideas, epic theatre, and absurdism to developments in the dramatic arts through the modern period into the twenty-first century. Includes plays by Lorraine Hansberry, Caryl Churchill, and Martin McDonagh. Readings staged.
270. Directing
Davis Robinson T 1:30 - 3:25, TH 1:30 - 3:25 Memorial-108
Introduces students to the major principles of play direction, including conceiving a production, script analysis, staging, casting, and rehearsing with actors. Students actively engage directing theories and techniques through collaborative class projects, and complete the course by conceiving, casting, rehearsing, and presenting short plays of their choosing. A final research and rehearsal portfolio is required.

Dance

102. Making Dances
Paul Sarvis T 11:30 - 1:25, TH 11:30 - 1:25 Memorial Hall-601 Dance Studio
Explores ways of choreographing dances and multimedia performance works, primarily solos, duets, trios. A strong video component introduces studentsóregardless of previous experience in danceóto a wide range of compositional methods that correspond to creative process in other arts: writing, drawing, composing. Includes some reading, writing, and discussion, as well as work with visiting professional dance companies and attendance at live performances.
111. Modern I: Technique
Paul Sarvis M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25 16 Station Ave-Dance Studio
Classes in modern dance technique include basic exercises to develop dance skills such as balance and musicality. More challenging movement combinations and longer dance sequences build on these exercises. While focusing on the craft of dancing, students develop an appreciation of their own styles and an understanding of the role of craft in the creative process. During the semester, a historical overview of twentieth-century American dance on video is presented. Attendance at all classes is required. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.
112. Modern I: Repertory and Performance
Paul Sarvis M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55 16 Station Ave-Dance Studio
Repertory students are required to take Dance 111 concurrently. Repertory classes provide the chance to learn faculty-choreographed works or reconstructions of historical dances. Class meetings are conducted as rehearsals for performances at the end of the semester: the December Studio Show, the annual Spring Performance in Pickard Theater, or Museum Pieces at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art in May. Additional rehearsals are scheduled before performances. Attendance at all classes and rehearsals is required. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.
121. Ballet I: Technique
Charlotte Griffin T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 16 Station Ave-Dance Studio
Introduces the fundamental principles of classical ballet technique as a studio practice and performing art. Includes barre, center, and across-the-floor exercises with an emphasis on anatomical alignment, complex coordination, movement quality, and musicality. Combines dance training with assigned reading and writing, video viewing, performance attendance, and in-class discussion to increase appreciation for and participation in the art form. Ballet I is a one-credit course with a separate lab.
121. Ballet I: Technique
Charlotte Griffin T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55 16 Station Ave-Dance Studio
Introduces the fundamental principles of classical ballet technique as a studio practice and performing art. Includes barre, center, and across-the-floor exercises with an emphasis on anatomical alignment, complex coordination, movement quality, and musicality. Combines dance training with assigned reading and writing, video viewing, performance attendance, and in-class discussion to increase appreciation for and participation in the art form. Ballet I is a one-credit course with a separate lab.
145. Performance and Narrative
Abigail Killeen M 9:30 - 11:25, W 9:30 - 11:25 Memorial-108
For millennia, we have organized our fictions, our religions, our histories, and our own lives as narratives. However much the narrative form has been called into question in recent years, it seems we just cannot stop telling each other stories. Examines the particular nexus between narrative and performance: What is narrative? How does it work? What are its limits and its limitations? How do we communicate narrative in performance? Involves both critical inquiry and the creation of performance pieces based in text, dance, movement, and the visual image.
231. Jazz II: Technique
Nyama McCarthy-Brown T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25 16 Station Ave-Dance Studio
Extends studentsí technical proficiency by increasing practice in jazz dance styles and intricate combinations; learning dance technique along with the appropriate historical and cultural contexts. Includes vocabulary, and variations of jazz, and focuses on its roots in social dance heavily influenced by African American traditions. Students have the opportunity to embody various jazz styles such as vintage jazz, Broadway jazz, lyrical jazz, and the jazz techniques of Bob Fosse and Luigi. A series of dance exercises and combinations teach jazz isolations, syncopation, musicality, and performance skills. Through this ongoing physical practice, students gain strength, flexibility, endurance, coordination, and style. Includes a performance requirement, and several readings. Attendance at all classes required. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.
232. Jazz II: Repertory and Performance
Nyama McCarthy-Brown T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 16 Station Ave-Dance Studio
Intermediate repertory students are required to take Dance 231 (same as Africana Studies 235) concurrently. A continuation of the principles and practices introduced in Dance 231. Attendance at all classes is required. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.
311. Modern III: Technique
Gwyneth Jones M 10:00 - 11:25, W 10:00 - 11:25 16 Station Ave-Dance Studio
A continuation of the processes introduced in Dance 211. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.
312. Modern III: Repertory and Performance
Gwyneth Jones M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 16 Station Ave-Dance Studio
Intermediate/advanced repertory students are required to take Dance 311 concurrently. A continuation of the principles and practices introduced in Dance 212. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.