Location: Bowdoin / Theater and Dance / Courses / Spring 2011

Theater and Dance

Spring 2011

Theater

101. Making Theater
Abigail Killeen M 9:30 - 11:25, W 9:30 - 11:25 Memorial-108
An active introductory exploration of the nature of theater: how to think about it, how to look at it, how to make it. Students examine a range of theatrical ideas and conventions, see and reflect on live performance, and experience different approaches to making work. Designers, directors, performers, and scholars visit the class to broaden perspective and instigate experiments. Students work collaboratively throughout the semester to develop and perform original work.

106. Introduction to Drama
William Watterson T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55 Druckenmiller-020
Traces the development of dramatic form, character, and style from classical Greece through the Renaissance and Enlightenment to contemporary America and Africa. Explores the evolution of plot design, with special attention to the politics of playing, the shifting strategies of representing human agency, and contemporary relationships between the theater and a variety of forms of mass media. Authors may include Sophocles, Aristophanes, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Dryden, Ibsen, Wilde, Beckett, Mamet, and Churchill.

120. Acting I
Abigail Killeen M 1:30 - 3:25, W 1:30 - 3:25 Memorial-108
Introduces students to the physical, emotional, and intellectual challenge of the acting process. Voice and movement work, analysis of dramatic texts from an actor’s point of view, and improvisational exercises are used to provide students with a variety of methods for acting truthfully on stage.

120. Acting I
Davis Robinson M 9:30 - 11:25, W 9:30 - 11:25 Memorial Hall-601 Dance Studio
Introduces students to the physical, emotional, and intellectual challenge of the acting process. Voice and movement work, analysis of dramatic texts from an actor’s point of view, and improvisational exercises are used to provide students with a variety of methods for acting truthfully on stage.

195. Production and Performance
Roger Bechtel
Engagement in the presentation of a full-length work for public performance with a faculty director or choreographer. Areas of concentration within the production may include design, including set, light, sound, or costume; rehearsal and performance of roles; service as assistant director or stage manager. In addition to fulfilling specific production responsibilities, students meet weekly to synthesize work. Students gain admission to Theater 195 either through audition (performers) or through advance consultation (designers, stage managers, and assistant directors). Students register for Theater 195 during the add/drop period at the beginning of each semester. Students are required to commit a minimum of six hours a week to rehearsal and production responsibilities over a period of seven to twelve weeks; specific time commitments depend upon the role the student is assuming in the production and the production schedule. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit. May be repeated a maximum of four times for credit, earning a maximum of two credits.

305. Studio 305
Roger Bechtel T 4:00 - 5:25, TH 4:00 - 5:25 Memorial-108
A senior theater seminar focusing on independent work. Advanced students creating capstone projects in playwriting, directing, acting, and design meet weekly as a group to critique, discuss, and present their work. Final performances are given at the end of the semester.

321. Comedy in Performance
Davis Robinson M 1:30 - 3:25, W 1:30 - 3:25 Memorial Hall-601 Dance Studio
Looks at several facets of comedy on stage, from its origins in Greek and Roman theater to contemporary comic forms. Theory is combined with practical exercises in clowning, satire, physical comedy, wit, timing, phrasing, and partner work to develop a comic vocabulary for interpreting both scripted and original work. Students work in solos, duets, and groups to create final performance projects that are presented to the public at the end of the semester.

Dance

111. Introductory Dance Technique
Paul Sarvis T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25 16 Station Ave-Dance Studio
Classes in modern dance technique include basic exercises to develop dance skills such as balance and musicality. More challenging movement combinations and longer dance sequences build on these exercises. While focusing on the craft of dancing, students develop an appreciation of their own styles and an understanding of the role of craft in the creative process. During the semester, a historical overview of twentieth-century American dance on video is presented. Attendance at all classes is required. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.

112. Introductory Repertory and Performance
Paul Sarvis T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 16 Station Ave-Dance Studio
Repertory students are required to take Dance 111 concurrently. Repertory classes provide the chance to learn faculty-choreographed works or reconstructions of historical dances. Class meetings are conducted as rehearsals for performances at the end of the semester: the December Studio Show, the annual Spring Performance in Pickard Theater, or Museum Pieces at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art in May. Additional rehearsals are scheduled before performances. Attendance at all classes and rehearsals is required. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.

140. Histories and Philosophies of Twentieth-Century Dance
Paul Sarvis M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 Memorial Hall-601 Dance Studio
Excavates histories of twentieth-century modern dance and ballet by asking aesthetic, philosophical, and social questions. Focuses on dance vocabularies and notions of representation--illusion and authenticity, intention and authorship, changing ideas of the performance space, the counter-cultural attitude of modernism, and the socio-political dimensions of dance performance. These inquiries are introduced by movement exercises in the studio, and elucidated by video viewing, reading, discussion, and writing.

211. Intermediate Dance Technique
Gwyneth Jones T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25 Memorial Hall-601 Dance Studio
A continuation of the processes introduced in Dance 111. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.

212. Intermediate Repertory and Performance
Gwyneth Jones T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 Memorial Hall-601 Dance Studio
Intermediate repertory students are required to take Dance 211 concurrently. A continuation of the principles and practices introduced in Dance 112. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.

270. Choreography for Dancers: Invention, Method, and Purpose
Charlotte Griffin T 9:30 - 11:25, TH 9:30 - 11:25 16 Station Ave-Dance Studio
Through a vigorous sequence of creative projects, fluent dancers excavate sources and explore methods for making dance. Detailed work on personal movement vocabulary, musicality, and the use of multidimensional space leads to a strong sense of choreographic architecture. Students explore the play between design and accident—communication and open-ended meaning—and irony and gravity. Studio work is supported by video viewing, and readings on dance, philosophy, and other arts.

311. Advanced/Intermediate Dance Technique
Charlotte Griffin M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25 16 Station Ave-Dance Studio
A continuation of the processes introduced in Dance 211. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.

312. Advanced/Intermediate Repertory and Performance
Charlotte Griffin M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55 16 Station Ave-Dance Studio
Intermediate/advanced repertory students are required to take Dance 311 concurrently. A continuation of the principles and practices introduced in Dance 212. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.