Location: Bowdoin / Theater and Dance / Courses / Spring 2010

Theater and Dance

Spring 2010

Theater

120. Acting I

Sonja Moser T  11:30 - 1:25
TH 11:30 - 1:25
Memorial-108
Introduces students to the physical, emotional, and intellectual challenge of the acting process. Voice and movement work, analysis of dramatic texts from an actor’s point of view, and improvisational exercises are used to provide students with a variety of methods for acting truthfully on stage.

145. Performance and Narrative
Roger Bechtel T  2:30 - 3:55
TH 2:30 - 3:55
Memorial Hall-601 Dance Studio
For millennia, we have organized our fictions, our religions, our histories, and our own lives as narratives. However much the narrative form has been called into question in recent years, it seems we just cannot stop telling each other stories. Examines the particular nexus between narrative and performance: What is narrative? How does it work? What are its limits and its limitations? How do we communicate narrative in performance? Involves both critical inquiry and the creation of performance pieces based in text, dance, movement, and the visual image.

195. Production and Performance
Davis Robinson   
Engagement in the presentation of a full-length work for public performance with a faculty director or choreographer. Areas of concentration within the production may include design, including set, light, sound, or costume; rehearsal and performance of roles; service as assistant director or stage manager. In addition to fulfilling specific production responsibilities, students meet weekly to synthesize work. Students gain admission to Theater 195 either through audition (performers) or through advance consultation (designers, stage managers, and assistant directors). Students register for Theater 195 during the add/drop period at the beginning of each semester. Students are required to commit a minimum of six hours a week to rehearsal and production responsibilities over a period of seven to twelve weeks; specific time commitments depend upon the role the student is assuming in the production and the production schedule. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit. May be repeated a maximum of four times for credit, earning a maximum of two credits.

195. Production and Performance
Michael Schiff-Verre  
Engagement in the presentation of a full-length work for public performance with a faculty director or choreographer. Areas of concentration within the production may include design, including set, light, sound, or costume; rehearsal and performance of roles; service as assistant director or stage manager. In addition to fulfilling specific production responsibilities, students meet weekly to synthesize work. Students gain admission to Theater 195 either through audition (performers) or through advance consultation (designers, stage managers, and assistant directors). Students register for Theater 195 during the add/drop period at the beginning of each semester. Students are required to commit a minimum of six hours a week to rehearsal and production responsibilities over a period of seven to twelve weeks; specific time commitments depend upon the role the student is assuming in the production and the production schedule. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit. May be repeated a maximum of four times for credit, earning a maximum of two credits.

195. Production and Performance
Sonja Moser 
Engagement in the presentation of a full-length work for public performance with a faculty director or choreographer. Areas of concentration within the production may include design, including set, light, sound, or costume; rehearsal and performance of roles; service as assistant director or stage manager. In addition to fulfilling specific production responsibilities, students meet weekly to synthesize work. Students gain admission to Theater 195 either through audition (performers) or through advance consultation (designers, stage managers, and assistant directors). Students register for Theater 195 during the add/drop period at the beginning of each semester. Students are required to commit a minimum of six hours a week to rehearsal and production responsibilities over a period of seven to twelve weeks; specific time commitments depend upon the role the student is assuming in the production and the production schedule. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit. May be repeated a maximum of four times for credit, earning a maximum of two credits.

225. Acting II: Physical Theater
Davis Robinson M  1:30 - 3:25
W  1:30 - 3:25
Memorial-108
Extends the principles of Acting I through a full semester of rigorous physical acting work focused on presence, energy, relaxation, alignment, and emotional freedom. Develops and brings the entire body to the act of being on stage through highly structured individual exercises and ensemble-oriented improvisational work. Scene work is explored through the movement-based acting disciplines of Lecoq, Grotowski, Meyerhold, or Viewpoints. Contemporary physical theater makers Théâtre de Complicité, Mabou Mines, SITI company, and Frantic Assembly are discussed. This course, along with Theater 220, Acting II: Voice and Text, is part of a two-semester course series. Theater 220 and 225 may be taken individually or in any order.

250. Theater, Dance, and the Common Good
Roger Bechtel T  11:30 - 12:55
TH 11:30 - 12:55
Memorial Hall-601 Dance Studio
Theater and dance have a long history of political engagement, social intervention, and community building. Examines the historical precedents for today's "applied" theater and dance practice, including Piscator, Brecht, Boal, Cornerstone Theatre, Judson Dance Theatre, and Yvonne Rainer. Significant time also spent working with local agencies and institutions to create community-based performances addressing social issues such as homelessness, poverty, prejudice, and the environment, among others.

323. Acting Shakespeare
Abigail Killeen M  9:30 - 11:25
W  9:30 - 11:25
Memorial-108
An advanced-level acting course dedicated to the study of Shakespeare toward its original purpose: performance. Building on the skill sets learned in Acting I and both sections of Acting II, students combine advanced text and rhetorical analysis with rigorous physical and vocal work designed to bring the text off the page and into performance.

370. Advanced Directing
Sonja Moser T  1:30 - 3:25
TH 1:30 - 3:25
Memorial-108
A continuation of Theater 270. Students build upon their knowledge of play analysis and staging to examine composition, design, and actor collaboration in greater depth. Advanced directing skills, theories, and techniques will be exercised through work on non-realistic material. Culminates with each student directing a 30-minute-long theatrical work.

Dance

102. Making Dances
Paul Sarvis T  9:30 - 11:25
TH 9:30 - 11:25
Memorial Hall-601 Dance Studio
Explores ways of choreographing dances and multimedia performance works, primarily solos, duets, trios. A strong video component introduces students—regardless of previous experience in dance—to a wide range of compositional methods that correspond to creative process in other arts: writing, drawing, composing. Includes some reading, writing, and discussion, as well as work with visiting professional dance companies and attendance at live performances.

111. Introductory Dance Technique
Gwyneth Jones T  1:00 - 2:25
TH 1:00 - 2:25
16 Station Ave-Dance Studio
Classes in modern dance technique include basic exercises to develop dance skills such as balance and musicality. More challenging movement combinations and longer dance sequences build on these exercises. While focusing on the craft of dancing, students develop an appreciation of their own styles and an understanding of the role of craft in the creative process. During the semester, a historical overview of twentieth-century American dance on video is presented. Attendance at all classes is required. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.

112. Introductory Repertory and Performance
Gwyneth Jones T  2:30 - 3:55
TH 2:30 - 3:55
16 Station Ave-Dance Studio
Repertory students are required to take Dance 111 concurrently. Repertory classes provide the chance to learn faculty-choreographed works or reconstructions of historical dances. Class meetings are conducted as rehearsals for performances at the end of the semester: the December Studio Show, the annual Spring Performance in Pickard Theater, or Museum Pieces at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art in May. Additional rehearsals are scheduled before performances. Attendance at all classes and rehearsals is required. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.

145. Performance and Narrative
Roger Bechtel T  2:30 - 3:55
TH 2:30 - 3:55
Memorial Hall-601 Dance Studio
For millennia, we have organized our fictions, our religions, our histories, and our own lives as narratives. However much the narrative form has been called into question in recent years, it seems we just cannot stop telling each other stories. Examines the particular nexus between narrative and performance: What is narrative? How does it work? What are its limits and its limitations? How do we communicate narrative in performance? Involves both critical inquiry and the creation of performance pieces based in text, dance, movement, and the visual image.

211. Intermediate Dance Technique
Paul Sarvis M  2:30 - 3:55
W  2:30 - 3:55
16 Station Ave-Dance Studio
A continuation of the processes introduced in Dance 111. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.

212. Intermediate Repertory and Performance
Paul Sarvis M  4:00 - 5:25
W  4:00 - 5:25
16 Station Ave-Dance Studio
Intermediate repertory students are required to take Dance 211 concurrently. A continuation of the principles and requirement introduced in Dance 112. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.

250. Theater, Dance, and the Common Good
Roger Bechtel T  11:30 - 12:55
TH 11:30 - 12:55
Memorial Hall-601 Dance Studio
Theater and dance have a long history of political engagement, social intervention, and community building. Examines the historical precedents for today's "applied" theater and dance practice, including Piscator, Brecht, Boal, Cornerstone Theatre, Judson Dance Theatre, and Yvonne Rainer. Significant time also spent working with local agencies and institutions to create community-based performances addressing social issues such as homelessness, poverty, prejudice, and the environment, among others.

311. Advanced/Intermediate Dance Technique
Gwyneth Jones M  2:30 - 3:55
W  2:30 - 3:55
Memorial Hall-601 Dance Studio
A continuation of the processes introduced in Dance 211. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.

312. Advanced/Intermediate Repertory and Performance
Gwyneth Jones M  4:00 - 5:25
W  4:00 - 5:25
Memorial Hall-601 Dance Studio
Intermediate/advanced repertory students are required to take Dance 311 concurrently. A continuation of the principles and requirement introduced in Dance 212. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.