Spring 2015 Courses

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Dance

DANC 1101A. Making Dances.
Explores movement invention, organization, and meaning. Problem-solving exercises, improvisations, and studies focus mainly on solo, duet, and trio forms. A video component introduces students—regardless of previous experience in dance—to a wide range of compositional methods and purposes. Includes reading, writing, discussion, attendance at live performances, and—when possible—work with visiting professional artists.
DANC 1101B. Making Dances.
Explores movement invention, organization, and meaning. Problem-solving exercises, improvisations, and studies focus mainly on solo, duet, and trio forms. A video component introduces students—regardless of previous experience in dance—to a wide range of compositional methods and purposes. Includes reading, writing, discussion, attendance at live performances, and—when possible—work with visiting professional artists.
DANC 1211. Modern I: Technique.
Classes in modern dance technique include basic exercises to develop dance skills such as balance and musicality. More challenging movement combinations and longer dance sequences build on these exercises. While focusing on the craft of dancing, students develop an appreciation of their own styles and an understanding of the role of craft in the creative process. During the semester, a historical overview of twentieth-century American dance on video is presented. Attendance at all classes is required. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.
DANC 1212. Modern I: Repertory and Performance.
Repertory students are required to take Dance 1211 {111} concurrently. Repertory classes provide the chance to learn faculty-choreographed works or reconstructions of historical dances. Class meetings are conducted as rehearsals for performances at the end of the semester: the December Studio Show, the annual Spring Performance in Pickard Theater, or Museum Pieces at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art in May. Additional rehearsals are scheduled before performances. Attendance at all classes and rehearsals is required. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.
DANC 3211. Modern III: Technique.
A continuation of the processes introduced in Dance 2211 (211). May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.
DANC 3212. Modern III: Repertory and Performance.
Intermediate/advanced repertory students are required to take Dance 3211 (311) concurrently. A continuation of the principles and practices introduced in Dance 2212 (212). May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.
DANC 3404. Advanced Dance Composition.
Dance composition for students with previously developed dance or movement practices. Original choreographic projects arise from embodied research, interdisciplinary collaboration, and the study of organizing principles. Includes composition assignments, peer/faculty critique, video viewing, and performance attendance. Reading and writing further contextualize the practice.

Theater

THTR 1201. Acting I.
Introduces students to the intellectual, vocal, physical, and emotional challenge of the acting process. Students examine theatrical texts and practice the art of translating intellectual analysis into embodied performance. Fundamentals of text analysis are learned and practiced, preparing students for the more complex performance work required in all sections of Acting II.
THTR 1202. Improvisation.
Improvisation is a fundamental tool used by dancers, musicians, actors, writers, and other artists to explore the language of a medium and to develop new work. An interdisciplinary introduction to some of the primary forms of improvisation used in dance and theater. Content includes theater games, narrative exercises, contact improvisation, and choreographic structures.
THTR 1700. Production and Performance.
Engagement in the presentation of a full-length work for public performance with a faculty director or choreographer. Areas of concentration within the production may include design, including set, light, sound, or costume; rehearsal and performance of roles; service as assistant director or stage manager. In addition to fulfilling specific production responsibilities, students meet weekly to synthesize work. Students gain admission to Theater 1700 {195} either through audition (performers) or through advance consultation (designers, stage managers, and assistant directors). Students register for Theater 1700 {195} during the add/drop period at the beginning of each semester. Students are required to commit a minimum of six hours a week to rehearsal and production responsibilities over a period of seven to twelve weeks; specific time commitments depend upon the role the student is assuming in the production and the production schedule. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit. May be repeated a maximum of four times for credit, earning a maximum of two credits.
THTR 1806. Introduction to Drama.
Traces the development of dramatic form, character, and style from classical Greece through the Renaissance and Enlightenment to contemporary America and Africa. Explores the evolution of plot design, with special attention to the politics of playing, the shifting strategies of representing human agency, and contemporary relationships between the theater and a variety of forms of mass media. Authors may include Sophocles, Aristophanes, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Dryden, Ibsen, Wilde, Beckett, Mamet, and Churchill.
THTR 2201. Acting II: Voice and Text.
An intermediate acting course focused on the physical discipline and intellectual challenge of pursuing theatrical objectives through language. Traditional and experimental vocal training techniques and are introduced and practiced. Students are also challenged to investigate character development through vocal choices, to learn how to communicate heightened emotion safely and effectively, and how to develop a rehearsal methodology for stage dialects. This course, along with Theater 2202 {225}, Acting II: Physical Theater, is part of a two-semester course series. Theater 2201 {220} and 2202 {225} may be taken individually or in any order.
THTR 2504. American Queen: Drag in Contemporary Art and Performance.
Explores the intersection of queer subcultures and contemporary artistic production. Also considers what constitutes drag culture, including cross- dressing, hyper-stylized language (“guuuuuuurl”) and performative gestures (e.g., “snapping”, teeth-sucking and eye-cutting). Emphasizes how “drag” links different kinds of explorations of self in a range of artistic mediums, alternately evoking gendered violence, humor and transformative possibility.
THTR 2846. Modern Drama and Performance.
Examines dramatic trends of the modern period, beginning with a triumvirate of modern dramatists—Henrik Ibsen, Bertolt Brecht, and Samuel Beckett—and draws lines from their work in drama of ideas, epic theatre, and absurdism to developments in the dramatic arts through the modern period into the twenty-first century. Includes plays by Lorraine Hansberry, Caryl Churchill, and Martin McDonagh. Readings staged.
THTR 3206. Theater Topics: Action, Light, and Meaning.
Experienced students will approach performing through a dramaturgy that considers lighting, sound, and scenography—as well as dramatic texts. Students work with a faculty director, professional designers, and guest artists to examine how the use of space, music, and light affect both audience reception, and the performer’s approach. Culminates in an original production in Wish Theater. Some evening rehearsals required.