Fall 2015 Courses

1101c. VPA. Making Dances. (Every year.) Fall 2015. Paul Sarvis.
Explores movement invention, organization, and meaning. Problem-solving exercises, improvisations, and studies focus mainly on solo, duet, and trio forms. A video component introduces students—regardless of previous experience in dance—to a wide range of compositional methods and purposes. Includes reading, writing, discussion, attendance at live performances, and—when possible—work with visiting professional artists.

1211c. VPA. Modern I: Technique. (Every semester.) Gwyneth Jones.
Classes in modern dance technique include basic exercises to develop dance skills such as balance and musicality. More challenging movement combinations and longer dance sequences build on these exercises. While focusing on the craft of dancing, students develop an appreciation of their own styles and an understanding of the role of craft in the creative process. During the semester, a historical overview of twentieth-century American dance on video is presented. Attendance at all classes is required.
May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.

1212c. VPA. Modern I: Repertory and Performance. (Every semester.) Gwyneth Jones.
Repertory students are required to take Dance 1211 concurrently. Repertory classes provide the chance to learn faculty-choreographed works or reconstructions of historical dances. Class meetings are conducted as rehearsals for performances at the end of the semester: the December Studio Show, the annual Spring Performance in Pickard Theater, or Museum Pieces at the Walker Art Building in May. Additional rehearsals are scheduled before performances. Attendance at all classes and rehearsals is required.
May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.

1302c. VPA. Principles of Design. Every year. Fall 2015. Judy Gailen.
An introduction to theatrical design that stimulates students to consider the world of a play, dance, or performance piece from a designer’s perspective. Through projects, readings, discussion, and critiques, students explore the fundamental principles of visual design, as they apply to set, lighting, and costume design, as well as text analysis for the designer, and the process of collaboration. Strong emphasis on perceptual, analytical, and communication skills. (Same as Theater 1302.)

2211c. VPA. Modern II: Technique. (Every semester.) Fall 2015. Gwyneth Jones.
A continuation of the processes introduced in Dance 1211. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit. Enrollment limited to 22 students.

2212c. VPA. Modern II: Repertory and Performance. (Every semester.) Fall 2015. Gwyneth Jones.
Intermediate repertory students are required to take Dance 2211 concurrently. A continuation of the principles and requirement introduced in Dance 1212. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit. Enrollment limited to 12 students.

2503c. VPA. Introduction to Black Performance Studies. Fall 2015. Christina Knight.
What does it mean to say that we "perform" our identities?  What role can performance play in the fight for racial and social justice?  As a people long denied access to literacy, what role has performance played in shaping the history of black Americans?  Performance studies—an interdisciplinary field devoted to the study of a range of aesthetic practices—offers us insight into such questions.  In this course, we will investigate performance "sites" including contemporary plays, movies and television, dance, and social media.  We will query the relationship between identities like race, gender, class, and performance as well as the connection between performance onstage and everyday life.  We will also examine the kinds of political questions that performers raise with their work as well as what role spectators play in shaping how performances communicate meaning. (Same as Theater 2503, Africana Studies 2502)

3221c. VPA. [new course] Modern IV: Technique. (Every year.) Charlotte Griffin.
A more demanding and detailed continuation of the processes introduced in Dance 2211 and 3211. May be repeated for credit. Graded. *One full credit.*

3222c. VPA. [new course] Modern IV: Repertory and Performance. (Every year.) Charlotte Griffin.  Creation and presentation of a fully developed dance for public performance under the direction of a faculty choreographer. Students audition and register for Dance 3222 during the first week of classes and must be concurrently enrolled in a Technique course at the 2000 level or higher.  Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit. May be repeated a maximum of four times for credit, earning a maximum of two credits.
AUDITIONS will be held Wednesday Sept 2, results posted Sept 3. Students register during the fall Add/Drop period.    

NOTE for Dance Technique Courses (Dance 1211, 1221, 2211, 2221, 3211, 3221):  Attendance at all performance studies dance classes, scheduled rehearsals, and performances is required. The Dance Studio is open at least fifteen minutes before the beginning of class. Classes begin promptly at the scheduled time. Roll is taken at the beginning of class. If a student must miss a class, he or she should leave a message with the department office prior to class. Though not desirable, up to four absences per semester are permissible for reasons of illness. Five absences in a semester, or missing any final rehearsal, means failure of the course. There are no make-up classes.

Recommended attire: Shorts or sweatpants are fine, and leotards and tights are also excellent dance wear. Usually women wear leotards and sweatpants or tights, and men wear a T-shirt and sweat pants. Clothing, bags, and shoes should be left on the shelves in the studio. No street shoes or boots are allowed on the studio floor.
All costumes must be returned before credit can be given for course.

Theater

1101c. VPA.  Making Theater. (Every year). Fall 2015. Abigail Killeen.
Making Theater is an active introductory exploration of the theatrical event.  Through critical readings, practical experimentation, peer critique, and live performance students examine theatrical story-telling from the actor’s, the designer’s, the director’s, and the audience’s point of view. Students will apply their newfound knowledge to a semester-long group collaboration culminating in an adaptation of children’s story for the stage.

1201c. VPA. Acting I. (Every semester). Fall 2015. Abigail Killeen.
Introduces students to the intellectual, vocal, physical and emotional challenge of the acting process. Students examine theatrical texts and practice the art of translating intellectual analysis into embodied performance. Fundamentals of text analysis are learned and practiced, preparing students for the more complex performance work required in all sections of Acting II.

1302c. VPA. Principles of Design. Every year. Fall 2015. Judy Gailen.
An introduction to theatrical design that stimulates students to consider the world of a play, dance, or performance piece from a designer’s perspective. Through projects, readings, discussion, and critiques, students explore the fundamental principles of visual design, as they apply to set, lighting, and costume design, as well as text analysis for the designer, and the process of collaboration. Strong emphasis on perceptual, analytical, and communication skills. (Same as Dance 1302.)

1700c. VPA. Production and Performance. (Every semester.) Abigail Killeen.
Engagement in the presentation of a full-length work for public performance with a faculty director or choreographer. Areas of concentration within the production may include design, including set, light, sound, or costume; rehearsal and performance of roles; service as assistant director or stage manager. In addition to fulfilling specific production responsibilities, students meet weekly to synthesize work. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor (by audition).

NOTE: Fall performance for Theater 1700 will be Sondheim on Sondheim by James Lapine, directed by Ed Reichert.  AUDITIONS will be held at the end of spring semester (TBD) for current students, with Additional auditions next fall for entering and returning students on Wednesday Sept 2. Casting will be announced in the fall. All are welcome. There are only singing roles. Please come prepared to sing. Otherwise nothing to prepare. Audition materials will be provided. Please sign up on Call Board outside the Theater and Dance office, 204 Memorial Hall (Sign-up will be posted at the end of August).

REGISTRATION: Theater 1700 Production and Performance is governed by several provisions. First, students are admitted only with permission from the instructor, which is gained either through audition (performers) or through advance consultation (designers, stage managers and assistant directors). The course is worth one-half credit and may be repeated a maximum of four times for credit, earning a maximum of two credits. Students register for Theater 1700 during the add/drop period at the beginning of each semester. Students are required to commit a minimum of six hours a week to rehearsal and production responsibilities over a period of seven to twelve weeks; specific time commitments depend upon the role the student is assuming in the production and the production schedule. This course does not count towards the minor in theater. Grading is Credit/D/Fail.

2203c. VPA.  Directing. (Every year.) Fall 2015. Davis Robinson.
Introduces students to the major principles of play direction, including conceiving a production, script analysis, staging, casting, and rehearsing with actors. Students actively engage directing theories and techniques through collaborative class projects, and complete the course by conceiving, casting, rehearsing, and presenting short plays of their choosing. A final research and rehearsal portfolio is required.
Prerequisite: One 1000-level course in theater or dance.

2503c. VPA. Introduction to Black Performance Studies. Fall 2015. Christina Knight.
What does it mean to say that we "perform" our identities?  What role can performance play in the fight for racial and social justice?  As a people long denied access to literacy, what role has performance played in shaping the history of black Americans?  Performance studies—an interdisciplinary field devoted to the study of a range of aesthetic practices—offers us insight into such questions.  In this course, we will investigate performance "sites" including contemporary plays, movies and television, dance, and social media.  We will query the relationship between identities like race, gender, class, and performance as well as the connection between performance onstage and everyday life.  We will also examine the kinds of political questions that performers raise with their work as well as what role spectators play in shaping how performances communicate meaning. (Same as Dance 2503, Africana Studies 2502)

3201c. Theater Styles. (Every third year.) Fall 2015. Davis Robinson.
An advanced acting class that explores issues of style. What is Tragedy? Farce? Melodrama? Commedia? Realism? The Absurd? Through research, analysis, and scene work in class, students become familiar with a range of theatrical idioms. Emphasis is placed on understanding the social/cultural needs that give rise to a particular style, and the way in which style is used in contemporary theater to support or subvert a text.
Prerequisite: One 1000-level course in theater and one additional course in theater or dance, preferably at the 2000 level.


Theater & Dance Classes – Fall 2015

Theater-Dance courses Fall 2015

CROSSLISTED COURSE:

THTR 2868/RUSS 2218: Smashing the Fourth Wall:
Russian Theater Arts in the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries. – Ceballos  MW 11:30-12:55

The following courses are not crosslisted with Theater, but are possible electives for the English-Theater major.
ENGL 1003: Shakespeare’s Afterlives – Kitch TR 11:30-12:55
ENGL 1115: Shakespeare on Film – Kitch TR 11:30-12:55
ENGL 2860: Character, Plot, Scene, Theme, Dream: The Fundamentals of Screen Writing – Walton MW 11:30-12:55 (crosslisted with Cinema Studies)

English/Theater – Interdisciplinary Major

The interdisciplinary major in English and theater focuses on the dramatic arts, broadly construed, with a significant emphasis on the critical study of drama and literature. Students of English and theater may blend introductory and advanced course work in both fields, while maintaining flexibility in the focus of their work. Honors theses in English and theater are listed as honors in English and theater, rather than in either field individually. Students completing an honors project should be guided by faculty in both fields. Students who decide to take this major are encouraged to work with advisors in both fields. Students wishing to study abroad are allowed to count two courses in approved study away programs such as the National Theater Institute or elsewhere toward the requirements for the major.  For requirements, please see the course catalogue.

date posted 04/07/2015