Fall 2013 Courses

  • Please note that for the 2013-14 academic year, official course numbers are now four digits. This page only shows the older three-digit course numbers. If you need to see both the old and the new numbers, consult the College Catalogue.
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Dance

101. Cultural Choreographies: An Introduction to Dance
Nyama McCarthy-Brown T 9:30 - 11:25, TH 9:30 - 11:25
Dancing is a fundamental human activity, a mode of communication, and a basic force in social life. Investigates dance and movement in the studio and classroom as aesthetic and cultural phenomena. Explores how dance and movement activities reveal information about cultural norms and values and affect perspectives in our own and other societies. Using ethnographic methods, focuses on how dancing maintains and creates conceptions of oneís own body, gender relationships, and personal and community identities. Experiments with dance and movement forms from different cultures and epochsófor example, the hula, New England contradance, classical Indian dance, Balkan kolos, ballet, contact improvisation, and African American dance forms from swing to hip-hopóthrough readings, performances, workshops in the studio, and field work.
102. Making Dances
Paul Sarvis T 9:30 - 11:25, TH 9:30 - 11:25
Explores ways of choreographing dances and multimedia performance works, primarily solos, duets, trios. A strong video component introduces studentsóregardless of previous experience in danceóto a wide range of compositional methods that correspond to creative process in other arts: writing, drawing, composing. Includes some reading, writing, and discussion, as well as work with visiting professional dance companies and attendance at live performances.
104. Stagecraft
Michael Schiff-Verre T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
Introduction to the language, theory, and practice of technical theater. Hands-on experience in lighting, scenic and property construction, costuming, and stage management. Considers the possibilities, demands, and limits inherent in different forms of performance and performance spaces, and explores the job roles integral to theater and dance production. Includes forty hours of laboratory work. Grading is Credit/D/Fail.
111. Modern I: Technique
Gwyneth Jones T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
Classes in modern dance technique include basic exercises to develop dance skills such as balance and musicality. More challenging movement combinations and longer dance sequences build on these exercises. While focusing on the craft of dancing, students develop an appreciation of their own styles and an understanding of the role of craft in the creative process. During the semester, a historical overview of twentieth-century American dance on video is presented. Attendance at all classes is required. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.
112. Modern I: Repertory and Performance
Gwyneth Jones T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
Repertory students are required to take Dance 1211 {111} concurrently. Repertory classes provide the chance to learn faculty-choreographed works or reconstructions of historical dances. Class meetings are conducted as rehearsals for performances at the end of the semester: the December Studio Show, the annual Spring Performance in Pickard Theater, or Museum Pieces at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art in May. Additional rehearsals are scheduled before performances. Attendance at all classes and rehearsals is required. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.
130. Principles of Design
Judy Gailen M 9:30 - 11:25, W 9:30 - 11:25
An introduction to theatrical design that stimulates students to consider the world of a play, dance, or performance piece from a designerís perspective. Through projects, readings, discussion, and critiques, students explore the fundamental principles of visual design, as they apply to set, lighting, and costume design, as well as text analysis for the designer, and the process of collaboration. Strong emphasis on perceptual, analytical, and communication skills.
221. Ballet II: Technique
Nyama McCarthy-Brown T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
A continuation of the processes introduced in Dance 1221 {121}. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.
222. Ballet II: Repertory and Performance
Nyama McCarthy-Brown T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
Repertory students are required to take Dance 2221 {221} concurrently. Repertory classes are an opportunity to learn and perform new choreography or historical reconstructions created by faculty or guests. Class meetings conducted as rehearsals. Additional rehearsals may be required. Attendance at all classes, studio and stage rehearsals, and performances required. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.
240. Performance in the Twenty-first Century: Avant- Garde/Neo Avant-Garde
Kathryn Syssoyeva T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
Examines contemporary forms such as live art, neo-cabaret, dance theatre, theatre of images, new circus, solo performance, site-specific theatre. Hybrid by nature and rebellious in spirit, these practices reject the boundaries and conventions of traditional theater and dance. Yet for all its innovation, contemporary performance has roots deep in the 20th avant-gardes. What, these days, is new about performance? Through readings, film screenings, and our own performance making, this course considers the genealogical roots of performance, and investigates the ways 21st century performance is exploring body, mind, technology, social justice, intercultural and transnational aesthetics, and globalism. Assignments will include readings, research presentations, written responses, and short-form performance projects.
311. Modern III: Technique
Paul Sarvis M 10:00 - 11:25, W 10:00 - 11:25
A continuation of the processes introduced in Dance 2211 {211}. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.
312. Modern III: Repertory and Performance
Paul Sarvis M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55
Intermediate/advanced repertory students are required to take Dance 3211 {311} concurrently. A continuation of the principles and practices introduced in Dance 2212 {212}. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.
322. Ensemble Devising: The Art of Collaborative Creation
Davis Robinson M 1:30 - 3:25, W 1:30 - 3:25
Experienced student actors, dancers, and musicians collaborate to devise an original performance event. Examines the history of collective creation and the various emphases different artists have brought to that process. Immerses students in the practice of devising, stretching from conception and research to writing, staging, and ultimately performing a finished piece.

Theater

104. Stagecraft
Michael Schiff-Verre T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
Introduction to the language, theory, and practice of technical theater. Hands-on experience in lighting, scenic and property construction, costuming, and stage management. Considers the possibilities, demands, and limits inherent in different forms of performance and performance spaces, and explores the job roles integral to theater and dance production. Includes forty hours of laboratory work. Grading is Credit/D/Fail.
120. Acting I
Sally Wood M 1:30 - 3:25, W 1:30 - 3:25
Introduces students to the intellectual, vocal, physical, and emotional challenge of the acting process. Students examine theatrical texts and practice the art of translating intellectual analysis into embodied performance. Fundamentals of text analysis are learned and practiced, preparing students for the more complex performance work required in all sections of Acting II.
130. Principles of Design
Judy Gailen M 9:30 - 11:25, W 9:30 - 11:25
An introduction to theatrical design that stimulates students to consider the world of a play, dance, or performance piece from a designerís perspective. Through projects, readings, discussion, and critiques, students explore the fundamental principles of visual design, as they apply to set, lighting, and costume design, as well as text analysis for the designer, and the process of collaboration. Strong emphasis on perceptual, analytical, and communication skills.
195. Production and Performance
Davis Robinson
Engagement in the presentation of a full-length work for public performance with a faculty director or choreographer. Areas of concentration within the production may include design, including set, light, sound, or costume; rehearsal and performance of roles; service as assistant director or stage manager. In addition to fulfilling specific production responsibilities, students meet weekly to synthesize work. Students gain admission to Theater 1700 {195} either through audition (performers) or through advance consultation (designers, stage managers, and assistant directors). Students register for Theater 1700 {195} during the add/drop period at the beginning of each semester. Students are required to commit a minimum of six hours a week to rehearsal and production responsibilities over a period of seven to twelve weeks; specific time commitments depend upon the role the student is assuming in the production and the production schedule. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit. May be repeated a maximum of four times for credit, earning a maximum of two credits.
201. Theater History and Theory: Theatrical Metamorphoses--Histories and Innovations
Kathryn Syssoyeva T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
Explores ìtheatre historyî as both a living source, and a language. Considers how innovative directors, performers, playwrights, choreographers, and designers of the modern and contemporary era have transformed the ìoldî to invent the ìnewî. Taking five high points of the theatrical past as a starting point ñ the theatres of Ancient Greece, of 16th c. Italian Commedia dellíArte, of Shakespeare in Elizabethan England and Moliere in 17th c. France, and of the Kabuki troupes of 17th c. Japan ñ students trace the metamorphoses of historic tales, texts, and forms of performance as they passed through the hands of theatre and dance artists of successive eras. Assignments will include readings, research presentations, written responses, and short-form performance projects. Students who previously took Theater 201 may also take this new version of the course for credit in Fall 2013.
210. Shakespeare's Comedies and Romances
William Watterson W 2:30 - 3:55, F 2:30 - 3:55
Examines A Midsummer Nightís Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Twelfth Night, As You Like It, The Winterís Tale, and The Tempest in light of Renaissance genre theory. Note: This course fulfills the pre-1800 literature requirement for English majors.
220. Acting II: Voice and Text
Sally Wood T 9:30 - 11:25, TH 9:30 - 11:25
An intermediate acting course focused on the physical discipline and intellectual challenge of pursuing theatrical objectives through language. Traditional and experimental vocal training techniques and are introduced and practiced. Students are also challenged to investigate character development through vocal choices, to learn how to communicate heightened emotion safely and effectively, and how to develop a rehearsal methodology for stage dialects. This course, along with Theater 2202 {225}, Acting II: Physical Theater, is part of a two-semester course series. Theater 2201 {220} and 2202 {225} may be taken individually or in any order.
223. English Renaissance Drama
Aaron Kitch T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
Explores the explosion of popular drama in London following the construction of the first permanent theaters in the 1560s. Pays special attention to the forms of drama that audiences liked bestóthose portraying revenge, marriage, middle-class ascendancy, and adultery. Topics include the cultural space of the theater, the structure of playing companies, and the cultivation of blank verse as a vehicle for theatrical expression. Students will master the styles of different playwrights, examine the topography of the Globe theater, and try out different staging techniques. Authors include Shakespeare, Thomas Kyd, Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson, and Thomas Middleton. Note: This course fulfills the pre-1800 literature requirement for English majors.
240. Performance in the Twenty-first Century: Avant- Garde/Neo Avant-Garde
Kathryn Syssoyeva T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
Examines contemporary forms such as live art, neo-cabaret, dance theatre, theatre of images, new circus, solo performance, site-specific theatre. Hybrid by nature and rebellious in spirit, these practices reject the boundaries and conventions of traditional theater and dance. Yet for all its innovation, contemporary performance has roots deep in the 20th avant-gardes. What, these days, is new about performance? Through readings, film screenings, and our own performance making, this course considers the genealogical roots of performance, and investigates the ways 21st century performance is exploring body, mind, technology, social justice, intercultural and transnational aesthetics, and globalism. Assignments will include readings, research presentations, written responses, and short-form performance projects.
322. Ensemble Devising: The Art of Collaborative Creation
Davis Robinson M 1:30 - 3:25, W 1:30 - 3:25
Experienced student actors, dancers, and musicians collaborate to devise an original performance event. Examines the history of collective creation and the various emphases different artists have brought to that process. Immerses students in the practice of devising, stretching from conception and research to writing, staging, and ultimately performing a finished piece.