Fall 2012 Courses

Theater

010. Understanding Theater and Dance: Doing, Viewing, and Reviewing
Melissa Thompson T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 Memorial-108
The goal is appreciation and understanding of contemporary performance. Investigates critical perspectives on dance, drama, and other performance events. Develops viewing and writing skills: description, analysis, interpretation, evaluation. Attending live performances, on and off campus, watching films and videos, and participating in studio workshops with performers and writers provide a basis for four essays and other modes of critical response—written, oral, or visual.
101. Making Theater
Melissa Thompson T 11:30 - 1:25, TH 11:30 - 1:25 Memorial-108
An active introductory exploration of the nature of theater: how to think about it, how to look at it, how to make it. Students examine a range of theatrical ideas and conventions, see and reflect on live performance, and experience different approaches to making work. Designers, directors, performers, and scholars visit the class to broaden perspective and instigate experiments. Students work collaboratively throughout the semester to develop and perform original work.
104. Stagecraft
Michael Schiff-Verre T 9:30 - 11:25, TH 9:30 - 11:25 Memorial-309 Stowe Sem Room
Introduction to the language, theory, and practice of technical theater. Hands-on experience in lighting, scenic and property construction, costuming, and stage management. Considers the possibilities, demands, and limits inherent in different forms of performance and performance spaces, and explores the job roles integral to theater and dance production. Includes forty hours of laboratory work. Grading is Credit/D/Fail.
120. Acting I
Abigail Killeen M 9:30 - 11:25, W 9:30 - 11:25 Memorial-108
Introduces students to the intellectual, vocal, physical, and emotional challenge of the acting process. Students examine theatrical texts and practice the art of translating intellectual analysis into embodied performance. Fundamentals of text analysis are learned and practiced, preparing students for the more complex performance work required in all sections of Acting II.
130. Principles of Design
Judy Gailen M 9:30 - 11:25, W 9:30 - 11:25 Memorial-309 Stowe Sem Room
An introduction to theatrical design that stimulates students to consider the world of a play, dance, or performance piece from a designer’s perspective. Through projects, readings, discussion, and critiques, students explore the fundamental principles of visual design, as they apply to set, lighting, and costume design, as well as text analysis for the designer, and the process of collaboration. Strong emphasis on perceptual, analytical, and communication skills.
195. Production and Performance
Davis Robinson
Engagement in the presentation of a full-length work for public performance with a faculty director or choreographer. Areas of concentration within the production may include design, including set, light, sound, or costume; rehearsal and performance of roles; service as assistant director or stage manager. In addition to fulfilling specific production responsibilities, students meet weekly to synthesize work. Students gain admission to Theater 195 either through audition (performers) or through advance consultation (designers, stage managers, and assistant directors). Students register for Theater 195 during the add/drop period at the beginning of each semester. Students are required to commit a minimum of six hours a week to rehearsal and production responsibilities over a period of seven to twelve weeks; specific time commitments depend upon the role the student is assuming in the production and the production schedule. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit. May be repeated a maximum of four times for credit, earning a maximum of two credits.
211. Shakespeare’s Tragedies and Roman Plays
William Watterson W 2:30 - 3:55, F 2:30 - 3:55 Sills-117
Examines Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, King Lear, Julius Caesar, Antony and Cleopatra, and Coriolanus in light of recent critical thought. Special attention is given to psychoanalysis, new historicism, and genre theory. Note: This course fulfills the pre-1800 literature requirement for English majors.
220. Acting II: Voice and Text
Abigail Killeen M 1:30 - 3:25, W 1:30 - 3:25 Memorial-108
An intermediate acting course focused on the physical discipline and intellectual challenge of pursuing theatrical objectives through language. Traditional and experimental vocal training techniques and are introduced and practiced. Students are also challenged to investigate character development through vocal choices, to learn how to communicate heightened emotion safely and effectively, and how to develop a rehearsal methodology for stage dialects. This course, along with Theater 225, Acting II: Physical Theater, is part of a two-semester course series. Theater 220 and 225 may be taken individually or in any order.
320. Theater Styles
Davis Robinson T 1:30 - 3:25, TH 1:30 - 3:25 Memorial Hall-601 Dance Studio
An advanced acting class that explores issues of style. What is Tragedy? Farce? Melodrama? Commedia? Realism? The Absurd? Through research, analysis, and scene work in class, students become familiar with a range of theatrical idioms. Emphasis is placed on understanding the social/cultural needs that give rise to a particular style, and the way in which style is used in contemporary theater to support or subvert a text.

Dance

010. Understanding Theater and Dance: Doing, Viewing, and Reviewing
Melissa Thompson T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 Memorial-108
The goal is appreciation and understanding of contemporary performance. Investigates critical perspectives on dance, drama, and other performance events. Develops viewing and writing skills: description, analysis, interpretation, evaluation. Attending live performances, on and off campus, watching films and videos, and participating in studio workshops with performers and writers provide a basis for four essays and other modes of critical response—written, oral, or visual.
102. Making Dances
Gwyneth Jones M 9:30 - 11:25, W 9:30 - 11:25 16 Station Ave-Dance Studio
Explores ways of choreographing dances and multimedia performance works, primarily solos, duets, trios. A strong video component introduces students—regardless of previous experience in dance—to a wide range of compositional methods that correspond to creative process in other arts: writing, drawing, composing. Includes some reading, writing, and discussion, as well as work with visiting professional dance companies and attendance at live performances.
103. African American Diasporic Dance: From the Ring Shout to Hip-Hop
Nyama McCarthy-Brown M 11:30 - 1:25, W 11:30 - 1:25 16 Station Ave-Dance Studio
Combines dance history, embodied research, and performance. Students engage in readings, class discussions, and movement studies that allow them to learn movement techniques from past eras. Students explore connections between cultural values and norms and movement aesthetics, and discover how African American vernacular dance and jazz music influenced jazz forms and American dance throughout the twentieth century (ragtime, swing, hot jazz, and hip-hop). Culminates with a performance in the December Dance Concert. Students meet once a week in a seminar setting to investigate one dance era, such as swing. The next two class meetings take place in a dance studio in order to embody the dance form discussed that week, and include rehearsals.
104. Stagecraft
Michael Schiff-Verre T 9:30 - 11:25, TH 9:30 - 11:25 Memorial-309 Stowe Sem Room
Introduction to the language, theory, and practice of technical theater. Hands-on experience in lighting, scenic and property construction, costuming, and stage management. Considers the possibilities, demands, and limits inherent in different forms of performance and performance spaces, and explores the job roles integral to theater and dance production. Includes forty hours of laboratory work. Grading is Credit/D/Fail.
130. Principles of Design
Judy Gailen M 9:30 - 11:25, W 9:30 - 11:25 Memorial-309 Stowe Sem Room
An introduction to theatrical design that stimulates students to consider the world of a play, dance, or performance piece from a designer’s perspective. Through projects, readings, discussion, and critiques, students explore the fundamental principles of visual design, as they apply to set, lighting, and costume design, as well as text analysis for the designer, and the process of collaboration. Strong emphasis on perceptual, analytical, and communication skills.
140. History of Twentieth-Century Dance
Paul Sarvis M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25 Memorial Hall-601 Dance Studio
Excavates histories of twentieth-century modern dance and ballet by asking aesthetic, philosophical, and social questions. Focuses on dance vocabularies and notions of representation—illusion and authenticity, intention and authorship, changing ideas of the performance space, the countercultural attitude of modernism, and the sociopolitical dimensions of dance performance. These inquiries are introduced by movement exercises in the studio, and elucidated by video viewing, reading, discussion, and writing.
211. Modern II: Technique
Gwyneth Jones T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25 16 Station Ave-Dance Studio
A continuation of the processes introduced in Dance 111. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.
212. Modern II: Repertory and Performance
Gwyneth Jones T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 16 Station Ave-Dance Studio
Intermediate repertory students are required to take Dance 211 concurrently. A continuation of the principles and practices introduced in Dance 112. May be repeated for credit. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.
221. Ballet II: Technique
Charlotte Griffin T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 16 Station Ave-Dance Studio
A continuation of the processes introduced in Dance 121. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.
222. Ballet II: Repertory and Performance
Charlotte Griffin T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55 16 Station Ave-Dance Studio
Repertory students are required to take Dance 221 concurrently. Repertory classes are an opportunity to learn and perform new choreography or historical reconstructions created by faculty or guests. Class meetings conducted as rehearsals. Additional rehearsals may be required. Attendance at all classes, studio and stage rehearsals, and performances required. Grading is Credit/D/Fail. One-half credit.
270. Choreography for Dancers: Invention, Method, and Purpose
Charlotte Griffin M 1:30 - 3:25, W 1:30 - 3:25 16 Station Ave-Dance Studio
Through a vigorous sequence of creative projects, fluent dancers excavate sources and explore methods for making dance. Detailed work on personal movement vocabulary, musicality, and the use of multidimensional space leads to a strong sense of choreographic architecture. Students explore the play between design and accident—communication and open-ended meaning—and irony and gravity. Studio work is supported by video viewing, and readings on dance, philosophy, and other arts.