Spring 2011 Courses

102. Elementary Spanish II
Eugenia Wheelwright M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25
Three class hours per week and weekly conversation sessions with assistant, plus laboratory assignments. An introduction to the grammar of Spanish, aiming at comprehension, reading, writing, and simple conversation. More attention is paid to reading and writing.
150. Don Quijote, the First Novel
John Turner T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
A reading of Cervantes' novel Don Quijote, with an introduction to its inception and relationship to previous literary tradition. Conducted in English.
204. Intermediate Spanish II
Maria Baez M 8:30 - 9:25, W 8:30 - 9:25, F 8:30 - 9:25
Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with the assistant. Grammar fundamentals are reviewed. Class conversation and written assignments are based on readings in modern literature.
204. Intermediate Spanish II
Maria Baez M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25
Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with the assistant. Grammar fundamentals are reviewed. Class conversation and written assignments are based on readings in modern literature.
205. Advanced Spanish
Carolyne Wolfenzon Niego T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
The study of a variety of texts and media, together with an advanced grammar review, designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.
209. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater
Gustavo Faveron-Patriau M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish.
209. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater
John Turner T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish.
210. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative
Carolyne Wolfenzon Niego T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.
210. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative
Esmeralda Ulloa M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.
302. The Idea of Latin America
Enrique Yepes T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
Studies how the region currently known as “Latin America” has been conceptualized from the fifteenth to the twenty-first centuries. Which geopolitical interests have shaped the idea of a geographical entity called Latin America? What does the term mean in different parts of the world? What has been the fate of alternate terms such as Abya-Yala, Indo-America, just America, Iberian-America, Spanish America, or the Indies? The analysis of various texts (in literature, history, cartography, philosophy, art, film, music, journalism) introduces intellectual and political debates around these terms, the region’s vast diversity, and whether or not it makes sense to consider it a unit. Conducted in Spanish.
304. Dress and Body Politics in Latin America
Esmeralda Ulloa M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55
Examines the significant role of the dressed body (both attire and the body itself) in the configuration of political discourse and national identity in Latin America. Focuses on verbal and visual representations of iconic figures such as Simón Bolívar, Pancho Villa, Rigoberta Menchú and Evo Morales, among others. The connection of these often contradictory images to governance and collective identities is explored in various contexts from the colonial period to the present. Conducted in Spanish.
328. Don Quijote
John Turner T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
Study of the text of Cervantes’s seminal work in its historical and cultural context, and consideration of some of its interpretations, in Spain and elsewhere.
332. Poetry and Social Activism in Latin America
Enrique Yepes T 6:30 - 9:25
Considers the aesthetic and thematic problems posed by socially committed poetry during the last one hundred years in Spanish America, from the avant-garde to the present. Authors include Mistral, Storni, Vallejo, Neruda, Guillén, Cardenal, Belli, and Parra, among others.
339. Borges and the Borgesian
Gustavo Faveron-Patriau M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55
An examination of the Argentinian writer Jorge Luis Borges’s work, focusing not only on his short stories, poems, essays, film scripts, interviews, and cinematic adaptations, but also on the writers who had a particular influence on his work. Also studies Latin American, European, and United States writers who were later influenced by the Argentinian master. An organizing concept is Borges’s idea that “a writer creates his own precursors. His work modifies our conception of the past, as it will modify the future.”