Spring 2015

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SPAN 1102. Elementary Spanish II.
Three class hours per week and weekly conversation sessions with assistant, plus laboratory assignments. An introduction to the grammar of Spanish, aiming at comprehension, reading, writing, and simple conversation. More attention is paid to reading and writing.
SPAN 1103. Accelerated Elementary Spanish.
Three class hours per week, plus one hour of weekly drill and conversation sessions with a teaching fellow. Covers in one semester what is covered in two semesters in the Spanish 1101–1102 (101–102) sequence. Study of the basic forms, structures, and vocabulary. Emphasis on listening comprehension and spoken Spanish. By placement or permission of instructor, for students with an advanced knowledge of a romance language or who would benefit from a review in the beginner’s stages.
SPAN 2204A. Intermediate Spanish II.
Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with the assistant. Grammar fundamentals are reviewed. Class conversation and written assignments are based on readings in modern literature.
SPAN 2204B. Intermediate Spanish II.
Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with the assistant. Grammar fundamentals are reviewed. Class conversation and written assignments are based on readings in modern literature.
SPAN 2305A. Advanced Spanish.
The study of topics in the political and cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world in the twentieth century, together with an advanced grammar review. Covers a variety of texts and media and is designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the intellectual and artistic traditions of Spain and Latin America. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.
SPAN 2305B. Advanced Spanish.
The study of topics in the political and cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world in the twentieth century, together with an advanced grammar review. Covers a variety of texts and media and is designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the intellectual and artistic traditions of Spain and Latin America. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.
SPAN 2409A. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater.
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 2409B. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater.
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 2410. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative.
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.
SPAN 3114. Fighting Fascism: The Spanish Civil War and Cinema.
Takes the Spanish Civil War as a case to study the way in which war in its many facets has been represented in cinema from the 1930s to present. Examines how the subject of war is taken up by different genres: newsreel, documentary, adventure, drama, horror, fantasy, and romantic comedy. Analyzes films from Spain alongside examples from the United States, Britain, France, and Mexico, paying special attention to how the political dimensions of the Spanish war, in the international context of the fight against Fascism, are subject to different interpretations of the conflict’s significance for history. Conducted in English. Writing assignments to be completed in Spanish.
SPAN 3115. Reading Don Quixote.
Provides a semester immersion in the reading, words and libraries of Don Quixote and its author Miguel de Cervantes. Alongside close reading of the novel, students will explore the material culture of early modern Spain as well as its afterlife and resurgence into the digital world. The course will also provide an introduction to manuscript and book culture through intensive collaboration with Bowdoin College special collections. Course readings, discussion, and writing in Spanish.
SPAN 3218. A Journey around Macondo: Garcia Marquez and His Contemporaries.
Studies the main topics, techniques, and contributions of Colombian Nobel Prize winner Gabriel García Márquez as presented in One Hundred Years of Solitude. Explores the actual locations, social, cultural and literary trends that inspired the creation of Macondo, the so- called “village of the world” where the novel takes place, and the universal themes to which this imaginary town relates. Contemporary authors include Fuenmayor, Cepeda Samudio, and Rojas Herazo.
SPAN 3248. Past and Present: Historical Novels in Latin America.
In order to explain the present we look at the past. But, how do we choose the regions of the past pertinent for our understanding of the present? Latin American writers seem obsessed with one particular period: the 16th and 17th centuries, on which hundreds of novels have been written. This course studies a variety of 20th- and 21st-century Latin American novels set in the Colonial period. It focuses on fictions that establish connections and implicit comparisons between 16th- and 17th-century political, cultural and social phenomena and current conjunctions in diverse Latin American nations. Topics include: theories of postcolonialism, historical and collective memory, discourses on history and literary representation, and historical continuities between the Colonial period and five contemporary Latin American countries (México, Colombia, Cuba, Argentina, and Peru.) Authors include Gabriel García Márquez, Carmen Boullosa, Reinaldo Arenas, Alejo Carpentier, Abel Posse, etc.