Spring 2014 Courses

  • The College Catalogue has a class finder tool to search for courses by title, instructor, department, and more.
  • Login to Blackboard. Instructional materials are available on a course-by-course basis.
SPAN 1102A. Elementary Spanish II.
Margaret Boyle.
Three class hours per week and weekly conversation sessions with assistant, plus laboratory assignments. An introduction to the grammar of Spanish, aiming at comprehension, reading, writing, and simple conversation. More attention is paid to reading and writing.
SPAN 1102B. Elementary Spanish II.
Maria Baez Marco.
Three class hours per week and weekly conversation sessions with assistant, plus laboratory assignments. An introduction to the grammar of Spanish, aiming at comprehension, reading, writing, and simple conversation. More attention is paid to reading and writing.
SPAN 2204A. Intermediate Spanish II.
Maria Baez Marco.
Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with the assistant. Grammar fundamentals are reviewed. Class conversation and written assignments are based on readings in modern literature.
SPAN 2204B. Intermediate Spanish II.
Maria Baez Marco.
Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with the assistant. Grammar fundamentals are reviewed. Class conversation and written assignments are based on readings in modern literature.
SPAN 2305A. Advanced Spanish.
Elena Cueto Asin.
The study of topics in the political and cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world in the twentieth century, together with an advanced grammar review. Covers a variety of texts and media and is designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the intellectual and artistic traditions of Spain and Latin America. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.
SPAN 2305B. Advanced Spanish.
Nadia Celis.
The study of topics in the political and cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world in the twentieth century, together with an advanced grammar review. Covers a variety of texts and media and is designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the intellectual and artistic traditions of Spain and Latin America. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.
SPAN 2409A. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater.
Margaret Boyle.
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 2409B. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater.
Enrique Yepes.
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 2410. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative.
Gustavo Faveron Patriau.
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.
SPAN 3002. The Idea of Latin America.
Enrique Yepes.
Studies how the region currently known as “Latin America” has been conceptualized from the fifteenth to the twenty-first centuries. Which geopolitical interests have shaped the idea of a geographical entity called Latin America? What does the term mean in different parts of the world? What has been the fate of alternate terms such as Abya-Yala, Indo-America, just America, Iberian-America, Spanish America, or the Indies? The analysis of various texts (in literature, history, cartography, philosophy, art, film, music, journalism) introduces intellectual and political debates around these terms, the region’s vast diversity, and whether or not it makes sense to consider it a unit. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 3226. A Body "of One's Own": Latina and Caribbean Women Writers.
Nadia Celis.
What kind of stories do bodies tell or conceal? How are those stories affected by living in a gendered body/subject? How do embodied stories relate to history and social realities? These are some of the questions addressed in this study of contemporary writing by women from the Hispanic Caribbean and the United States Latina/Chicana communities. Films and popular culture dialogue with literary works and feminist theory to enhance the course examination of the relation of bodies and sexuality to social power, and the role of this relation in the shaping of both personal and national identities Authors include Julia Álvarez, Fanny Buitrago, Magali García Ramis, Judith Ortiz Cofer, and Mayra Santos-Febres, among others.Taught in Spanish with readings in Spanish and English.
SPAN 3239. Borges and the Borgesian.
Gustavo Faveron Patriau.
An examination of the Argentinian writer Jorge Luis Borges’s work, focusing not only on his short stories, poems, essays, film scripts, interviews, and cinematic adaptations, but also on the writers who had a particular influence on his work. Also studies Latin American, European, and United States writers who were later influenced by the Argentinian master. An organizing concept is Borges’s idea that “a writer creates his own precursors. His work modifies our conception of the past, as it will modify the future.”
SPAN 3244. Romantic Spain.
Elena Cueto Asin.
Explores the production of Romantic images of Spain and their lasting influence on literature from the 19th Century to the present. Works by Spanish Romantics (Espronceda, Zorrilla, Becquer, de Castro) and those by others, mostly writing in English, for whom Spain is a romanticized backdrop (Byron, Irving, Longfellow, Dos Passos, Hemingway), are examined in light of the aesthetic and cultural foundations of the movement in Europe (historical hindsight, the political dissent, finding national identity). Also discussed are the resulting Romantic archetypes (Don Juan, Carmen, bandits and bulls) and the way in which these arise and evolve through interaction and contact. Readings in English and Spanish, discussions and required writing in Spanish.