Location: Bowdoin / Spanish / Courses / Fall 2009

Spanish

Fall 2009

101. Elementary Spanish I
Esmeralda Ulloa M 8:30 - 9:25, W 8:30 - 9:25, F 8:30 - 9:25 Adams-114
Three class hours per week and weekly conversation sessions with assistant, plus laboratory assignments. An introduction to the grammar of Spanish, aiming at comprehension, reading, writing, and simple conversation. Emphasis is on grammar structure, with frequent oral drills. Spanish 101 is open to first- and second-year students who have had less than one year of high school Spanish.

203. Intermediate Spanish I
Carolyne Wolfenzon Niego M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25 Sills-205
Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with the teaching assistant. Grammar fundamentals are reviewed. Class conversation and written assignments are based on readings in modern literature.

203. Intermediate Spanish I
Gustavo Faveron-Patriau M 11:30 - 12:25, W 11:30 - 12:25, F 11:30 - 12:25 HL-311 (third floor)
Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with the teaching assistant. Grammar fundamentals are reviewed. Class conversation and written assignments are based on readings in modern literature.

204. Intermediate Spanish II
Nadia Celis M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25 Adams-406
Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with the assistant. Grammar fundamentals are reviewed. Class conversation and written assignments are based on readings in modern literature.

205. Advanced Spanish
John Turner T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Druckenmiller-024
The study of a variety of journalistic and literary texts and visual media, together with an advanced grammar review, designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.

205. Advanced Spanish
Elena Cueto-Asin M 1:00 - 2:25, W 1:00 - 2:25 Sills-207
The study of a variety of journalistic and literary texts and visual media, together with an advanced grammar review, designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.

205. Advanced Spanish
Enrique Yepes T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55 Sills-207
The study of a variety of journalistic and literary texts and visual media, together with an advanced grammar review, designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.

209. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater
John Turner T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25 Sills-109
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from Pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish.

210. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative
Carolyne Wolfenzon Niego M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 Sills-205
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from Pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.

301. Contemporary Spain: Diversity, Tradition, Change
Elena Cueto-Asin M 10:00 - 11:25, W 10:00 - 11:25 The Hazelton Room (Kanbar 109)
A study of contemporary Spain through the analysis of a wide array of texts (essay, press, film, advertisement, music, etc.), aimed at understanding the complexities of a society and culture as determined by geographical, linguistic, and ethnic diversity, and by forces of history and tradition vis-Ã -vis modernity and political change. Conducted in Spanish.

315. Engaging Neruda’s Canto General
Enrique Yepes T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 Sills-207
Delves into Latin America’s most renowned twentieth-century epic poem as it engages history, geography, aesthetics, subjectivity, gender, and a post-colonial gaze. Close reading of the book meshes with the study of its intellectual breeding ground and follow-up in diverse media. Examines precursors, enthusiasts, and challengers in poetry by Alonso de Ercilla, Andrés Bello, Ernesto Cardenal, Martín Adán, and Elicura Chihuailaf; in visual arts by the Mexican muralists and Martín Chambi; in music by Silvestre Revueltas, Peter Schat, and the Nueva Canción movement; and in narrative by Hernán Cortés and Eduardo Galeano, among others. Conducted in Spanish.

318. A Journey around Macondo: García Márquez and His Contemporaries
Nadia Celis M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55 Sills-207
Studies the main topics, techniques, and contributions of Colombian Nobel Prize winner Gabriel García Márquez as presented in "One Hundred Years of Solitude." Explores the actual locations, social, and cultural trends that inspired the creation of Macondo, the so-called “village of the world” where the novel takes place, and the universal themes to which this imaginary town relates. His work is read in connection with other contemporary writers who were part of the intellectual climate in which the novel was written, such as José Félix Fuenmayor, Álvaro Cepeda Samudio, and Héctor Rojas Herazo. Conducted in Spanish.

319. Letters from the Asylum: Madness and Representation in Latin American Fiction
Gustavo Faveron-Patriau M 6:30 - 9:25 Edward Pols House-Conf Room
Explores the concept of madness and the varying ways in which mental illness has been represented in twentieth-century Latin American fiction. Readings include short stories and novels dealing with the issues of schizophrenia, paranoia, and psychotic behavior by authors such as Horacio Quiroga, Jorge Luis Borges, Cristina Rivera Garza, and Carlos Fuentes. Also studies the ways in which certain authors draw from the language and symptoms of schizophrenia and paranoia in order to construct the narrative structure of their works and in order to enhance their representation of social, political, and historical conjunctures. Authors include Diamela Eltit, Ricardo Piglia, César Aira, and Roberto Bolaño.