Location: Bowdoin / Spanish / Courses / Fall 2012

Spanish

Fall 2012

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101. Elementary Spanish I
Maria Baez M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25 Sills-207
An introduction to the grammar of Spanish, aiming at comprehension, reading, writing, and simple conversation. Emphasis is on grammar structure, with frequent oral drills. Spanish 101 is primarily open to first- and second-year students, with a limited number of spaces available for juniors and seniors who have had less than one year of high school Spanish.

203. Intermediate Spanish I
Eugenia Wheelwright M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25 Sills-111
Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with the teaching assistant. Grammar fundamentals are reviewed. Class conversation and written assignments are based on readings in modern literature.

203. Intermediate Spanish I
Eugenia Wheelwright M 10:30 - 11:25, W 10:30 - 11:25, F 10:30 - 11:25 Sills-111
Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with the teaching assistant. Grammar fundamentals are reviewed. Class conversation and written assignments are based on readings in modern literature.

204. Intermediate Spanish II
Maria Baez M 9:30 - 10:25, W 9:30 - 10:25, F 9:30 - 10:25 Sills-207
Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with the assistant. Grammar fundamentals are reviewed. Class conversation and written assignments are based on readings in modern literature.

205. Advanced Spanish
Nadia Celis M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55 Sills-205
The study of topics in the political and cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world in the twentieth century, together with an advanced grammar review. Covers a variety of texts and media and is designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the intellectual and artistic traditions of Spain and Latin America. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.

205. Advanced Spanish
Margaret Boyle T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25 Sills-107
The study of topics in the political and cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world in the twentieth century, together with an advanced grammar review. Covers a variety of texts and media and is designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the intellectual and artistic traditions of Spain and Latin America. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.

205. Advanced Spanish
Margaret Boyle T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 Sills-205
The study of topics in the political and cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world in the twentieth century, together with an advanced grammar review. Covers a variety of texts and media and is designed to increase written and oral proficiency, as well as appreciation of the intellectual and artistic traditions of Spain and Latin America. Foundational course for the major. Three class hours per week and one weekly conversation session with assistant.

209. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Poetry and Theater
Elena Cueto-Asin M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 Sills-207
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of poetry and theater. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context. One weekly workshop with assistant in addition to class time. Conducted in Spanish.

210. Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Essay and Narrative
Carolyne Wolfenzon Niego T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55 Sills-107
A chronological introduction to the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world from pre-Columbian times to the present, with particular emphasis on the analysis of essay and narrative. Examines major literary works and movements in their historical and cultural context.

250. The Making of A Race: Latino Fictions
Nadia Celis M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 The Hazelton Room (Kanbar 109)
Explores the creation, representation and marketing of U.S. Latino/a identities in American literature and popular culture from the 1960s. Focuses on the experience of artists and writers of Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Dominican origin, their negotiations with notions of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the United States, their role in the struggle for social rights, in cultural translation, and in the marketing of ethnic identities, as portrayed in a variety of works ranging from movies and songs to poetry and narrative. Authors include Pietri, Blades, Álvarez, Hijuelos, Braschi, Ovejas, Díaz, and Quiñones. Readings and writing in English, discussions in Spanish. Spanish speaking skills required.

305. The Making of A Race: Latino Fictions
Nadia Celis M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55 The Hazelton Room (Kanbar 109)
Explores the creation, representation and marketing of U.S. Latino/a identities in American literature and popular culture from the 1960s. Focuses on the experience of artists and writers of Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Dominican origin, their negotiations with notions of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the United States, their role in the struggle for social rights, in cultural translation, and in the marketing of ethnic identities, as portrayed in a variety of works ranging from movies and songs to poetry and narrative. Authors include Pietri, Blades, Álvarez, Hijuelos, Braschi, Ovejas, Díaz, and Quiñones. Readings in English, discussions and writing in Spanish.

321. Andean Modernities
Carolyne Wolfenzon Niego T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55 The Hazelton Room (Kanbar 109)
Through the discussion of essays, novels, short stories, and films, explores the different ways in which Andean nations have dealt with processes of social, political, and cultural modernization. Focuses on how literature and the arts have represented, responded, and contributed to those processes, since the late nineteenth century until the present day, through local reelaborations of modernist, avant-garde, and postmodernist aesthetics. Readings include works by Peruvian authors Clorinda Matto de Turner, César Vallejo, and Mario Vargas Llosa; Bolivians like Hilda Mundy and Jaime Sáenz; and Ecuadorians like Pablo Palacio and Jorge Enrique Adoum. Addresses the issue of migration and the reconfigurations of Andean identities in the United States, through the works of Bolivian author Edmundo Paz Soldán and the Ecuadorian-American writer Ernesto Quiñonez.

324. Twentieth-Century Spanish Theater
Elena Cueto-Asin M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55 Sills-107
Examines works by Spanish playwrights of the twentieth century in light of the innovations of the Avant-Garde movements of the 1920s and 1930s, the limitations imposed by censorship under the Franco dictatorship, and the plurality of voices that emerges during the present democratic period. The study of plays by García Lorca, Buero Vallejo, Arrabal, Diosdado, and others tracks the evolution of the experimental qualities of the theater, as well as gives special attention to the ways in which political and historical discourses are adapted for the stage. Part of the course includes recitation of scenes.

347. Translating Cultures
Janice Jaffe T 6:30 - 9:25 Sills-111
Far beyond the linguistic exercise of converting words from one language to another, translation is an art that engages the practitioner in cultural, political and aesthetic questions. How does translation influence national identity? What are the limits of translation? Can culture be translated? How does gender affect translation? Students explore these questions and develop strategies and techniques through translating texts from a variety of cultural contexts and literary and non-literary genres. Also explores ethics and techniques of interpreting between Spanish and English in different fields.