News

Internship Takes Genevieve Anderle '19 to Cutting Edge of Psychological Research

As part of a community initiative in Philadelphia, summer intern works with pioneers of cognitive behavorial therapy to learn more about mental health research and treatment.

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Students Share Class Research into Race, Higher Education, and Bowdoin

In their fall sociology class, Diversity in Higher Education, students not only looked at racial issues at U.S. universities generally, but also collaborated on a final research project to investigate race specifically on Bowdoin's campus.

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Five Professors Appointed to Named Chairs

Five members of the Bowdoin faculty, in disciplines ranging from English to psychology and the sciences, have been appointed to named chairs in recognition of their contributions to scholarship and teaching at the College.

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Common Good Symposium Showcases a "Little Bit of Everything"

A wealth of projects and programs were showcased at the McKeen Center's Spring Symposium, Bowdoin and the Common Good. Posters, presentations, photographs, and video were on display in the Morrell Lounge of the Smith Union, representing more than sixty examples of Bowdoin's commitment to the wider community.

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Bowdoin's MacEachern Discusses Anthropology on Maine Public Radio

MacEachern explained that the world of an archaeologist is similar to that done by other anthropologists seeking to understand human behavior. The essential difference however, is that archaeologists look to the past to try to answer those questions.

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Sociology Major Daisy Wislar ’18 Opens Windows onto Disability and Sexuality

Daisy Wislar's honors project is "groundbreaking," Assistant Professor of Sociology Theo Greene said, for bringing to light the lives of people often overlooked or misunderstood by both academics and the mainstream population.

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Journalist Jose Antonio Vargas at Bowdoin: Life as an Undocumented Immigrant

During his visit, reporter and activist Jose Antonio Vargas said, "I think we really need to insist on that at a time when it is much easier for people to surround yourself with others who agree with you, who agree with all the words you use, your point of view and your prism. And it is much harder to hold spaces with people who challenge you."

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Why Boko Haram Insurgents are 'Slave Raiders,’ and What Can Be Done About It

People in the borderlands between Cameroon and Nigeria commonly refer to the Islamist terrorist group Boko Haram as "slave raiders," Professor of Anthropology Scott MacEachern explains in The Washington Post. "There’s good reason to use that term," he continues. "In many striking ways, Boko Haram’s raids for 'wives' parallel the slave raids of a century ago."

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Three Things Sara Dickey Wants You To Know about Her Latest Book 'Living Class in Urban India' — And the Cool Honor It Just Received

Professor of Anthropology Sara Dickey's latest book, Living Class in Urban India, has been honored by the Association for Asian Studies.

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Eleven Faculty Members Promoted with Tenure

From plate tectonics to molecular ecology, from the history of jazz to Asian Communism, from game theory to the French Revolution, the candidates span a wide variety of subjects.

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MacEachern Book Studies Origins of Boko Haram

"The book stresses how Boko Haram is really a local group with deep historical roots in the region, rather than a straightforward, off-the-shelf, Al Qaeda 'franchise,' which is how it's often described."

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Diya Chopra ’18 Gathers Stories of Young Refugees who Arrive Alone

"I became more sensitive to the refugee crisis," senior Diya Chopra said, when asked how the experience changed her. She said she is interested in a career in international development. "The media shows a very negative view, but I gained a lot of inspiration from the refugees because they were so determined to work through these situations."

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Adaiah Hudgins-Lopez ’18 Creates 'Reciprocal Storytelling' for Hard Conversations

"I'm thinking about [reciprocal storytelling] as a tool for successful communication across difference," Adaiah Hudgins-Lopez said, serving as a bridge across race, ethnicity, age, religion, class, geography, and other divides.

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Meet the New Tenure-Track Faculty

Bowdoin College this year hired eight new tenure-track faculty members in a variety of fields, from dance and music, to computer science and mathematics, by way of government, biology and sociology.

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Bowdoin's Riley Comments on China's One-Child Policy

Scholars, including Riley, debate hotly-contested study assessing impact of China's controversial one-child policy.

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No White Gloves: College Archives Give Students Hands-on History, Including the History of Race at Bowdoin

Each year, librarian Marieke Van Der Steenhoven scours the course catalog to pick out classes that might overlap with Bowdoin's archives, which are vast and varied. "Bowdoin has such amazing collections, they are really remarkable," she said.

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Bowdoin's MacEachern on 'Fast Science' and the Myth of African National IQ

The anthropology professor says he's disturbed by the extent to which bad data sets, propagating racist stereotypes, can find their way into mainstream academic journals.

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Revisiting an Arctic Mystery

On a practical level there was an urgency about this archaeological trip to Greenland, brought about by the fact that the landscape is altering rapidly due to climate change.

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Bowdoin Senior 'Gleans' Surplus Farm Produce to Help Feed the Hungry (Forecaster)

Shannon McCabe has spent the summer working on a fellowship program that redirects surplus farm produce to food pantries.

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Five Years Out: A NYC Midwife, Natalia Richey ’11

If someone had told Natalia Richey ’11 during her first year at Bowdoin that she would one day be working as a midwife at a big city hospital, she would have scoffed. She has just delivered her 150th baby.

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