Location: Bowdoin / Sociology and Anthropology / Courses / Spring 2005

Sociology and Anthropology

Spring 2005

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Anthropology

014. Weather, Climate and Culture
Anne Henshaw T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
Explores anthropological approaches to understanding meteorological phenomenon in a variety of cultural contexts. Drawing on ethnographic and archaeological case studies, emphasis will be placed on the way humans have responded to weather and climatic variability as well as the symbolic and cognitive dimensions associated with such phenomenon in everyday life. Examines the relationship climate change science and how such change is experienced on scales relevant to human activity. Case studies will be drawn from both pre-industrial and industrial societies in the New and Old World.
101. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Sara Dickey T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
Cultural anthropology explores the diversities and commonalities of cultures and societies in an increasingly interconnected world. This course introduces students to the significant issues, concepts, theories, and methods in cultural anthropology. Topics may include: cultural relativism and ethnocentrism, fieldwork and ethics, symbolism, language, religion and ritual, political and economic systems, family and kinship, gender, class, ethnicity and race, nationalism and transnationalism, and ethnographic representation and validity.
102. Introduction to World Prehistory
Leslie Shaw T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
An introduction to the discipline of archaeology and the studies of human biological and cultural evolution. Among the subjects covered are conflicting theories of human biological evolution, debates over the genetic and cultural bases of human behavior, the expansion of human populations into various ecosystems throughout the world, the domestication of plants and animals, the shift from nomadic to settled village life, and the rise of complex societies and the state.
219. Anthropology of Globalization: Cultural Flows and Mobile Subject
Jill Wightman M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55
In this course we will approach the concept of globalization from the perspective of cultural anthropology, analyzing the complex mobilities and interconnections that characterize the globe today. The course explore the global flow of people, capital, commodities, images and ideologies using some of the seminal writings in the development of the field, as well as several book-length ethnographic case studies. We will discuss the implications of all this global movement on anthropological notions of culture and society, as well as anthropological methods for research.
225. Class and Culture
Jill Wightman T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
Examines theories of class and hierarchy, ranging from Marx and Weber to Foucault, and ethnographies of class cultures. Investigates the mutual impact of class and culture, the places of socioeconomic classes in wider systems of stratification, and the interaction of class and other forms of hegemony.
233. Peoples and Cultures of Africa
S MacEachern T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
Introduction to the traditional patterns of livelihood and social institutions of African peoples. Following a brief overview of African geography, habitat, and cultural history, lectures and readings cover a representative range of types of economy, polity, and social organization, from the smallest hunting and gathering societies to the most complex states and empires. Emphasis upon understanding the nature of traditional social forms; changes in African societies in the colonial and post-colonial periods are examined, but are not the principal focus of the course.
237. Family, Gender, and Sexuality in Latin America
Krista Van Vleet W 2:30 - 3:55, F 2:30 - 3:55
Focuses on family, gender, and sexuality as windows onto political, economic, social, and cultural issues in Latin America. Topics include indigenous and natural gender ideologies, marriage, race, and class; machismo and masculinity; state and domestic violence; religion and reproductive control; compulsory heterosexuality; AIDS; and cross-cultural conceptions of homosexuality. Takes a comparative perspective and draws on a wide array of sources including ethnography, film, fiction, and historical narrative.
243. Modernity in South Asia
Sara Dickey T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
What is modernity? How does it differ cross-culturally, and what forms does it take in South Asia? In the countries of South Asia�including India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and Nepal�many aspects of everyday life are both affected by and shape modernity. Economic liberalization, religious nationalism, and popular media are examined, while investigating changes in caste, class, work, gender, family, and religious identities in South Asia.
280. Race, Biology and Anthropology
S MacEachern T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
Critically examines the biological justifications used to partition humanity into racial groups. Investigates the nature of biological and genetic variability within and between human populations, as well as the characteristics of human biological races as they have traditionally been defined. Considers whether race models do a good job of describing how human populations vary across the earth. Critically appraises works by a variety of authors, including Phillippe Rushton, Charles Murray, and Michael Levin, who claim that racial identity and evolution work together to structure the history and the potentials of human groups in different parts of the world.
310. Contemporary Issues in Anthropology
Krista Van Vleet M 1:00 - 3:55
Close readings of recent ethnographies and other materials are used to examine current theoretical and methodological developments and concerns in anthropology.

Sociology

101. Introduction to Sociology
Courtney Jackson M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55
The major perspectives of sociology. Application of the scientific method to sociological theory and to current social issues. Theories ranging from social determinism to free will are considered, including the work of Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Merton, and others. Attention is given to such concepts as role, status, society, culture, institution, personality, social organization, the dynamics of change, the social roots of behavior and attitudes, social control, deviance, socialization, and the dialectical relationship between individual and society.
201. Introduction to Social Research
Nancy Riley M 6:30 - 7:55
Provides firsthand experience with the specific procedures through which social science knowledge is developed. Emphasizes the interaction between theory and research, and examines the ethics of social research and the uses and abuses of research in policy making. Reading and methodological analysis of a variety of case studies from the sociological literature. Field and laboratory exercises that include observation, interviewing, use of available data (e.g., historical documents, statistical archives, computerized data banks, cultural artifacts), sampling, coding, use of computer, elementary data analysis and interpretation. Lectures, laboratory sessions, and small-group conferences.
LAB
Nancy Riley W 2:30 - 3:55
Provides firsthand experience with the specific procedures through which social science knowledge is developed. Emphasizes the interaction between theory and research, and examines the ethics of social research and the uses and abuses of research in policy making. Reading and methodological analysis of a variety of case studies from the sociological literature. Field and laboratory exercises that include observation, interviewing, use of available data (e.g., historical documents, statistical archives, computerized data banks, cultural artifacts), sampling, coding, use of computer, elementary data analysis and interpretation. Lectures, laboratory sessions, and small-group conferences.
LAB
Nancy Riley TH 10:00 - 11:25
Provides firsthand experience with the specific procedures through which social science knowledge is developed. Emphasizes the interaction between theory and research, and examines the ethics of social research and the uses and abuses of research in policy making. Reading and methodological analysis of a variety of case studies from the sociological literature. Field and laboratory exercises that include observation, interviewing, use of available data (e.g., historical documents, statistical archives, computerized data banks, cultural artifacts), sampling, coding, use of computer, elementary data analysis and interpretation. Lectures, laboratory sessions, and small-group conferences.
LAB
Nancy Riley TH 1:00 - 2:25
Provides firsthand experience with the specific procedures through which social science knowledge is developed. Emphasizes the interaction between theory and research, and examines the ethics of social research and the uses and abuses of research in policy making. Reading and methodological analysis of a variety of case studies from the sociological literature. Field and laboratory exercises that include observation, interviewing, use of available data (e.g., historical documents, statistical archives, computerized data banks, cultural artifacts), sampling, coding, use of computer, elementary data analysis and interpretation. Lectures, laboratory sessions, and small-group conferences.
202. Analyzing the Social Landscape
Courtney Jackson M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55
Abortion, affirmative action, same sex marriage, educational attainment, social class rankings. How do sociologists use quantitative data analysis to make sense of these and other issues? Examines current views and behavior within the United States using the General Social Survey. Using SPSS, students learn techniques of data analysis, including univariate descriptive statistics, bivariate correlations and crosstabulations, and linear regression.
209. Immigration, Culture and Community
Janet Lohmann T 1:00 - 2:25, TH 1:00 - 2:25
Provides sociological perspectives on the historical and contemporary development of ethnic communities, with emphasis on select post-1965 immigration. Among other things, may cover sociological theories on immigration, enclaves and communities, a comparison of different communities, the role of ethnic enclaves in the mobility/ acculturation of immigrants and the second generation, community formation in multi-cultural settings, and political/ policy issues of ethnic communities.
211. Classics of Sociological Theory
Susan Bell T 11:30 - 12:55, TH 11:30 - 12:55
An analysis of selected works by the founders of modern sociology. Particular emphasis is given to understanding differing approaches to sociological analysis through detailed textual interpretation. Works by Marx, Weber, Durkheim, and selected others are read.
212. Gender and Crime
Janet Lohmann T 10:00 - 11:25, TH 10:00 - 11:25
Examines how gender intersects with the understanding of crime and the criminal justice system. Gender is a salient issue in examining who commits what types of crimes, who is most often victimized, and how the criminal justice system responds to these victims and offenders. Students explore the context of crimes such as domestic violence and sexual assault, as well as how the correctional system and social policy are affected by the issue of gender.
217. Overcoming Racism
H. Partridge W 1:00 - 3:55
Explores and critiques a variety of proposed solutions for healing racism in the United States. A working definition of racism is developed through a careful examination of the social structures that support the continuance of racism and discrimination based on race in the United States. The dominant/subordinate relationships of European Americans with African Americans, Latino/a Americans, Native Americans, and Asian Americans are reviewed.
220. Class, Labor, and Power
Joe Bandy M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55
An examination of social class and the corresponding structures of labor, status, and power in the United States. Surveys a variety of sociological perspectives and applies them to analyze class inequality, labor relations, and social policy. Topics include class stratification, class identity, poverty, corporate power, consumption, labor movements, and the social impacts of new technology and trade.
261. Contemporary Chinese Society, Part 1
Nancy Riley M 11:30 - 12:55, W 11:30 - 12:55
Examines several key elements of contemporary society, exploring how Chinese society has changed in recent years and how social institutions such as family, education, and community have been a part of the recent economic and social restructuring. Pays particular attention to how individuals, families, and communities have fared through the many changes. Part of a two-course sequence that includes Asian Studies 262.
262. Contemporary Chinese Society, Part 2
Nancy Riley
A continuation of Asian Studies 261, this course includes a six-week trip to China at the end of the spring semester. There, students see firsthand some of the issues studied during the regular semester at Bowdoin. The trip includes lectures and seminars on current issues in China. In addition, students continue work on projects developed during the semester. Grading for this course is Credit/D/Fail.
310. Advanced Seminar: Current Controversies in Sociology
Susan Bell T 2:30 - 3:55, TH 2:30 - 3:55
Draws together different theoretical and substantive issues in sociology in the United States, primarily since 1950. Discusses current controversies in the discipline, e.g., quantitative versus qualitative methodologies, micro versus macro perspectives, and pure versus applied work.
310. Advanced Seminar: Current Controversies in Sociology
Joe Bandy M 2:30 - 3:55, W 2:30 - 3:55
Draws together different theoretical and substantive issues in sociology in the United States, primarily since 1950. Discusses current controversies in the discipline, e.g., quantitative versus qualitative methodologies, micro versus macro perspectives, and pure versus applied work.

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